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2002 F350 7.3. 190,000 miles. Losing a quart every 30 miles when pulling empty 40 ft gooseneck. Losing hardly any when driving just the truck. Fuel bowl is clear. No oil in turbo lines . No smoke and tail pipe is not wet. No visible leaks. No oil under body or on the bumper, tailgate, or trailer Took oil cap off and very little blow by. Using delo 400 15w-40 since new Ford mechanic said three cylinders were low on compression and may have stuck rings .I ran a quart of transmission fluid per tank for a couple of tanks with no change. Truck runs great with no loss of power and no turbo noise.
 

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2002 F350 7.3. 190,000 miles. Losing a quart every 30 miles when pulling empty 40 ft gooseneck. Losing hardly any when driving just the truck. Fuel bowl is clear. No oil in turbo lines . No smoke and tail pipe is not wet. No visible leaks. No oil under body or on the bumper, tailgate, or trailer Took oil cap off and very little blow by. Using delo 400 15w-40 since new Ford mechanic said three cylinders were low on compression and may have stuck rings .I ran a quart of transmission fluid per tank for a couple of tanks with no change. Truck runs great with no loss of power and no turbo noise.
Why did you run tranny fluid in the fuel?

Did you look in the engine valley?

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Why did you run tranny fluid in the fuel?

Did you look in the engine valley?

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I was told if had a sticking ring that trans fluid could possibly loosen it up. No oil in the valley
 

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Any thoughts ? I am at a loss and don’t know what to do
It's going somewhere. It's leaking or burning (captain obvious). Can you park somewhere that you can see if it leaks? Maybe let it idle for awhile.

Have you checked the oil pan, dipstick, and flywheel cover? Clean under the truck real well so you can see the leak.

I'd think if it's burning that much there would be smoke or blowby.

You should send your oil to Blackstone next change.

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It's going somewhere. It's leaking or burning (captain obvious). Can you park somewhere that you can see if it leaks? Maybe let it idle for awhile.

Have you checked the oil pan, dipstick, and flywheel cover? Clean under the truck real well so you can see the leak.

I'd think if it's burning that much there would be smoke or blowby.

You should send your oil to Blackstone next change.

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The truck stays on concrete with no leaks . There is very little oil on the frame. There is no smoke The only time there is any oil loss is when the truck is pulling a load. Load being an empty 40 ft gooseneck.
 

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The truck stays on concrete with no leaks . There is very little oil on the frame. There is no smoke The only time there is any oil loss is when the truck is pulling a load. Load being an empty 40 ft gooseneck.
It's above my pay grade. I was hoping someone else would chime in. It must be burning it. It may not smoke as diesel is just oil. If you have compression problems that's my guess. Under load oil is getting past and burned.

Hopefully someone who isn't an idiot like me has some advice. An engine isn't going to be cheap.

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A dude on here got it less than that. @forthehalibut can chime in.

IRRC he got a new complete engine (injectors turbo etc) and a new tranny for 15k. I think the engine was 10k installed. Point is everything was refurbished. It was a jasper which is about as good as a remanufactured engine gets.

Still $10k and your into the truck more than it's worth. You probably already are.

If you have bad compression I'd think you'd have blowby.

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What are you hauling on a 40 foot trailer?
 

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Not much anymore. I was mainly hauling deer hunting stands for years . Until about 06 then it has had a gravy life
 

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Was just curious, the quart in 30 miles should be obvious, I mean like smoke or dribbles on the vehicles behind you -- like 450 miles and you are done
 
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I don't feel that "oil in the fuel filter" is indicative of anything, and is just internet folklore.

Think about it: If you are consuming a quart of oil in 30 miles, You are consuming 10 quarts of diesel fuel (at 12 MPG). Because these fuel systems are return-less, how can engine oil get into the fuel filter if the engine is consuming more fuel than there is oil being introduced into the fuel system? It can't. Put 1 ounce of engine oil in 10 ounces of Diesel and see if you can tell any difference. I doubt it.

I would think about the injector o-rings. Higher engine load is higher HPOP, which may be enough to get by the o-rings, where under low-load it would not.

The "low compression" is also concerning, but without the actual numbers to compare to each other and to other engines, kind of meaningless.

Unless it has been really worked hard, or overheated or over EGT'd, 190,000 miles shouldn't result in "ring problems".

I would run a Blackstone Report on the oil. Ring and piston problems should show up as elevated Iron, Chromium, and Aluminum. (Someone mentioned forthehalibut's engine replacement. I remember he posted a Blackstone a few months before his engine that I saw issues with the readings. I don't recall his exact response, but I remember he brushed it off as "no big deal". He replaced his engine a few months later.) Run a Universal Oil Analysis, and see what it says. You don't have to change the oil, just drain a few ounces and put the plug back in. I'd suggest take the sample after the oil has been in the engine as long as possible without adding make-up oil, which can obscure the findings. If the UOA comes back with normal trace-metal readings, I'd be trying replacing the o-rings before condemning the engine.

There's some ideas.
 

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I don't feel that "oil in the fuel filter" is indicative of anything, and is just internet folklore.


I would run a Blackstone Report on the oil. Ring and piston problems should show up as elevated Iron, Chromium, and Aluminum. (Someone mentioned forthehalibut's engine replacement. I remember he posted a Blackstone a few months before his engine that I saw issues with the readings. I don't recall his exact response, but I remember he brushed it off as "no big deal". He replaced his engine a few months later.) Run a Universal Oil Analysis, and see what it says. You don't have to change the oil, just drain a few ounces and put the plug back in. I'd suggest take the sample after the oil has been in the engine as long as possible without adding make-up oil, which can obscure the findings. If the UOA comes back with normal trace-metal readings, I'd be trying replacing the o-rings before condemning the engine.

There's some ideas.
DaveP, what am I looking for in the oil report? Blackstone said my metals were at or below normal. That's what I want right?


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DaveP, what am I looking for in the oil report?
The top 5 metals are "wear metals". These are the indicators of engine health. On the far right side of a Blackstone Report are the Universal Averages. These values are an average of all the reports that Blackstone has done on similar engines/equipment. IIRC the "average" oil change interval for the 7.3 reports is about 6,000 miles. The value that is most affected by time in service is Iron. The longer the oil has been in the engine, the more iron it will contain. Iron comes from cyl walls. I looked at the UAs from one of my reports. They are top to bottom for the first 5 2, 1, 18, 4, 4. So your engine is not "wearing".

Silicon is the indicator for air filtration. Your silicon is 64, the UA is 8. If there have been repairs where silicone sealants were used (I'm thinking the dipsitck adapter repair), this could be the source of the silicon. If this is what is causing the high silicon, another test should show a reduction. Otherwise, your air filtration needs a looking at. My silicon has been 6-7 for 95,000 miles. I run an AIS air filter.

Insolubles are an indication of oil filtration efficiency. You're fine. My last change interval was 13,800 miles and I was .2.

The last thing I see of concern is the viscosities. They are below the minimums for the stated viscosity of the oil you told them it is. Viscosities should be near the maximums on 3,250 mile oil. An explanation can be if you changed viscosity from a 'thinner' oil for this interval. The 2 quarts that remain in the HPOP will influence the reading. I had this happen when I changed from 10/30 the PO was running in Colorado to the 15/40 Delo I prefer in SoCal. It took 2 changes before the viscosities matched the expected viscosity for 15/40.

Last comment: Blackstones are useful for 7.3's because they have tested so many 7.3's, the UAs are stable enough for comparison to a single report for a specific engine, like we have done here. But the real value is in re-current testing. You're looking for trends or changes from previous samples. And things like fuel, coolant, silicon contamination can clue in to look for a problem you may not have been aware of. So for $28, it's way worth it to keep testing.

Your engine is healthy. But take a look at your air filter strategy.
 

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The top 5 metals are "wear metals". These are the indicators of engine health. On the far right side of a Blackstone Report are the Universal Averages. These values are an average of all the reports that Blackstone has done on similar engines/equipment. IIRC the "average" oil change interval for the 7.3 reports is about 6,000 miles. The value that is most affected by time in service is Iron. The longer the oil has been in the engine, the more iron it will contain. Iron comes from cyl walls. I looked at the UAs from one of my reports. They are top to bottom for the first 5 2, 1, 18, 4, 4. So your engine is not "wearing".

Silicon is the indicator for air filtration. Your silicon is 64, the UA is 8. If there have been repairs where silicone sealants were used (I'm thinking the dipsitck adapter repair), this could be the source of the silicon. If this is what is causing the high silicon, another test should show a reduction. Otherwise, your air filtration needs a looking at. My silicon has been 6-7 for 95,000 miles. I run an AIS air filter.

Insolubles are an indication of oil filtration efficiency. You're fine. My last change interval was 13,800 miles and I was .2.

The last thing I see of concern is the viscosities. They are below the minimums for the stated viscosity of the oil you told them it is. Viscosities should be near the maximums on 3,250 mile oil. An explanation can be if you changed viscosity from a 'thinner' oil for this interval. The 2 quarts that remain in the HPOP will influence the reading. I had this happen when I changed from 10/30 the PO was running in Colorado to the 15/40 Delo I prefer in SoCal. It took 2 changes before the viscosities matched the expected viscosity for 15/40.

Last comment: Blackstones are useful for 7.3's because they have tested so many 7.3's, the UAs are stable enough for comparison to a single report for a specific engine, like we have done here. But the real value is in re-current testing. You're looking for trends or changes from previous samples. And things like fuel, coolant, silicon contamination can clue in to look for a problem you may not have been aware of. So for $28, it's way worth it to keep testing.

Your engine is healthy. But take a look at your air filter strategy.
[/QUOTE
I don't feel that "oil in the fuel filter" is indicative of anything, and is just internet folklore.

Think about it: If you are consuming a quart of oil in 30 miles, You are consuming 10 quarts of diesel fuel (at 12 MPG). Because these fuel systems are return-less, how can engine oil get into the fuel filter if the engine is consuming more fuel than there is oil being introduced into the fuel system? It can't. Put 1 ounce of engine oil in 10 ounces of Diesel and see if you can tell any difference. I doubt it.

I would think about the injector o-rings. Higher engine load is higher HPOP, which may be enough to get by the o-rings, where under low-load it would not.

The "low compression" is also concerning, but without the actual numbers to compare to each other and to other engines, kind of meaningless.

Unless it has been really worked hard, or overheated or over EGT'd, 190,000 miles shouldn't result in "ring problems".

I would run a Blackstone Report on the oil. Ring and piston problems should show up as elevated Iron, Chromium, and Aluminum. (Someone mentioned forthehalibut's engine replacement. I remember he posted a Blackstone a few months before his engine that I saw issues with the readings. I don't recall his exact response, but I remember he brushed it off as "no big deal". He replaced his engine a few months later.) Run a Universal Oil Analysis, and see what it says. You don't have to change the oil, just drain a few ounces and put the plug back in. I'd suggest take the sample after the oil has been in the engine as long as possible without adding make-up oil, which can obscure the findings. If the UOA comes back with normal trace-metal readings, I'd be trying replacing the o-rings before condemning the engine.

There's some ideas.
Thanks for the input . I will definitely send off a sample and see what the results are
 

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Your engine is healthy. But take a look at your air filter strategy.
I run stock air and ford filter. The oil in there was changed from a synthetic so some would have been left in the hpop. Oil was changed for a reseal of oil pan and dipstick.

I'll send another test when I change the oil next (probably March). I only put about 5-6k a year on her so she gets bi-annual changes.

Thanks for looking and taking the time to write all of that up. It'll be especially helpful when I get the next report.

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I would run a Blackstone Report on the oil. Ring and piston problems should show up as elevated Iron, Chromium, and Aluminum.
THIS MAY BE A LITTLE OFF TOPIC.....BUT I WANTED TO ASK.....

SINCE MY TRUCK HAS BEEN SITTING AT MY FRIEND'S SHOP FOR THE LAST 2 YEARS.....IT HAS ONLY RUN ABOUT 5 HOURS THE WHOLE TIME.....NOW THAT I AM GOING TO START DRIVING IT.....I PLAN TO CHANGE THE OIL.....

SO.....SHOULD I WAIT UNTIL I HAVE PUT A FEW THOUSAND MILES ON THE FRESH OIL BEFORE I GET AN OIL REPORT.....

OR SHOULD I JUST TAKE A SAMPLE OF WHAT IS IN THERE BEFORE I CHANGE THE OIL AND SEND IT IN FOR TESTING RIGHT AWAY?....

THANKS.....
 

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THIS MAY BE A LITTLE OFF TOPIC.....BUT I WANTED TO ASK.....

SINCE MY TRUCK HAS BEEN SITTING AT MY FRIEND'S SHOP FOR THE LAST 2 YEARS.....IT HAS ONLY RUN ABOUT 5 HOURS THE WHOLE TIME.....NOW THAT I AM GOING TO START DRIVING IT.....I PLAN TO CHANGE THE OIL.....

SO.....SHOULD I WAIT UNTIL I HAVE PUT A FEW THOUSAND MILES ON THE FRESH OIL BEFORE I GET AN OIL REPORT.....

OR SHOULD I JUST TAKE A SAMPLE OF WHAT IS IN THERE BEFORE I CHANGE THE OIL AND SEND IT IN FOR TESTING RIGHT AWAY?....

THANKS.....
The blackstone sample kit has instructions and I think it says the sample needs to be 4000 or 5000 miles... Don't remember which.

It'll take about 2 weeks for the sample kit to arrive. With my report they send me 5 more sample kits so if you're near Savannah I'll give you one.

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THANKS.....BUT I'M ABOUT 800 MILES TO THE NORTH.....
 
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