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  Topic Review (Newest First)
08-06-2019 07:49 AM
SixStringMadness
Quote:
Originally Posted by guitarnut View Post
The issue will eventually become parts. Try to find a wire harness for an obs (eg 95). That's one of the reasons I got rid of my OBS (not wire harness, learned that from wild Bill Hewitt). Parts were always a PITA. Even with a 2001, there are none in junk yards in the Savannah area because I need some small part but Ford only sells a whole assembly for $150...

Wild Bill Hewitt sells refurbished 6.0s for 30k.. granted they are beautiful with new motors and will go another 200k after he does his thing (he says this and I believe him) but there won't be any parts for it when you get to the 200k to keep it running.

Also, wild Bill's shop no longer does 7.3s (and won't touch the 6.4) so it is a sign of things to come. Plus new mechanics don't know the 7.3.

Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
I'm driving a wild bill built 6.0 - brought a truck to him - and it will likely be my last diesel for some time. I drove my friend's 2019 6.7 that was impressive, no doubt about it. Gobb-loads of torque! A peek under the hood, and holy mother does it look complex. Not that I couldn't figure it out, but the time it would take to get familiar with it, and I can't lift a cab. Seems it was designed to be worked on that way. Then he told me what he paid. Its just not worth that much to me. If you put that much money in a pile in front of me, I would do something else with it. Granted, should a modern diesel garner the reputation of a 7.3L or 5.9L, then I would have something to think about, but I think those days indestructible diesels in pickups are gone. While they are engineering and technological marvels now, they are also finicky and ticking time bombs.

Are we hearing stories of any of these common rail, EGR, DPF, DEF engines going untouched, 3, 4, 500K or beyond? I'm not, so I won't say they are not out there.

My personal choice, I can't think of letting loose of $80k for a vehicle that I'm quite confident my current vehicle will outlast, which I have less than half that in. I would actually like to retire some day.

BTW, I've seen a few $100K priced models. I'm sorry, that's insane! If you can do that, I'm happy for you, but if I spend that on a vehicle, it better be red and Italian.
08-06-2019 12:37 AM
guitarnut
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisArnold View Post
That's really an interesting point. I'm 37 y/o. I drive the truck to tow my cars, or when I do my own move across the country. I've put ~30k miles on it in 3 years, from 151k to the current 180k. If I manage 10k per year, and the truck goes 500k miles, then I'll be 69 y/o when it's time to upgrade, assuming I don't care to rebuild the motor. If I did rebuild it, then it would definitely out live me.



That's a scary long time to own a truck.
The issue will eventually become parts. Try to find a wire harness for an obs (eg 95). That's one of the reasons I got rid of my OBS (not wire harness, learned that from wild Bill Hewitt). Parts were always a PITA. Even with a 2001, there are none in junk yards in the Savannah area because I need some small part but Ford only sells a whole assembly for $150...

Wild Bill Hewitt sells refurbished 6.0s for 30k.. granted they are beautiful with new motors and will go another 200k after he does his thing (he says this and I believe him) but there won't be any parts for it when you get to the 200k to keep it running.

Also, wild Bill's shop no longer does 7.3s (and won't touch the 6.4) so it is a sign of things to come. Plus new mechanics don't know the 7.3.

Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
08-06-2019 12:17 AM
ChrisArnold
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJC2 View Post
The older Super Duty's are one of the few vehicles that can actually outlive a man. If I keep it serviced and in good repair, my son will be driving it when I'm pushing daisies.
That's really an interesting point. I'm 37 y/o. I drive the truck to tow my cars, or when I do my own move across the country. I've put ~30k miles on it in 3 years, from 151k to the current 180k. If I manage 10k per year, and the truck goes 500k miles, then I'll be 69 y/o when it's time to upgrade, assuming I don't care to rebuild the motor. If I did rebuild it, then it would definitely out live me.

That's a scary long time to own a truck.
08-05-2019 11:42 AM
PDR60 I own both a 96 obs and a 2002. They are both CCLWB with the 2002 being a dually. I paid 7500 for the 96 back in 14 and 6000 for the 2002. Both are southern trucks without any rust. The price for the 02 was low because it needed an engine rebuild. It's in that process now with a 480hp build going on. The 96 is my dd and it's been flawless. Never been stranded and do all my own work. Its never been to a "shop" while I've owned it. It's now got 327k on the original injectors and is still going strong. In fact, I just added a bypass oil filter on it. It's been converted to e-fuel and is the only vehicle I can count on to start Everytime the key is turned. Both are standards so the weakest link is not even in the picture. I've done a couple of E4OD overhauls/updates/mods and I like the ZF'S a whole lot better. These engines are really pretty simple and they're a breeze to work on. Some tasks are a bit more challenging than others but at least I can do all the work.
07-30-2019 08:34 AM
guitarnut
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pmedic920 View Post
I have to assume most of you are guys that have owned your truck for a long time. Not a bad thing, its a simple observation.

In my particular case, I just bought my first ever diesel truck.
2000 f250 CC 7.3. 182k miles. Its a clean trk with a few minor problems.

Ive been daily driving a Jeep Unlimited Rubicon that bought new in 17. Ive upgraded a bunch of stuff to make it better off road, and I wanted to be able to trailer it to the trails. I also wanted to stop daily driving the Jeep.
Ill be driving the truck b&f to work.

Id guess that these older 7.3s vary substantially in price based on regional location. Here in the Houston Tx. area, these trks. are popular and probably priced higher than they are in many places.

I paid 12,200 and thats a little below average but the trk I got is in significantly better shape that what I found to be average.

I could have gone directly to the dealership and financed a new truck with all the bells/whistles. Easily would have been north of 50k, probably closer to 60k.

I got a decent trk at a fair price based on what I found available in my area. My wife isnt embarrassed to ride in it(and shes picky). I was able to pay cash. I feel like even though Id be above actual value, I can put another 10k into this trk and for about 1/3 of the cost of new. Thats a whole lot of playing around money left over.

Dont get me wrong, I like nice things, and a warranty is always nice. The new Trucks are beautiful (regardless of brand), and I fought with myself over the decision. But at the end of the day, I think it was a no brainer.

IMHO, this really boils down to a money issue. I/we do OK but do not flow in excess spendable money. Most people dont.
If money was no object, no way Id have bought a 20 y/o vehicle with 182k miles on it but Im happy with it. Im no mechanic but I can change parts and actually enjoy turning wrenches. Im looking forward to getting another 200k miles out of this truck, Im looking at it as another automotive hobby. Thats an aspect of the question that I wouldnt have if I had purchased new.

This forum is a wealth of information, and I appreciate yall for your contributions.
Ill be leaning heavily, yall can take that to the (figurative) bank.
2 years ago I paid 10.5 for mine had it shipped from MS to Savannah for 500 putting me in it for 11. New tires and brakes year 1 now new AC, GPs, and ucvhs this year and I am all in around 15. I have 230k and I hope I can get another 100k out of it. Driving it 10k per year I'll have this truck until I am sick of having a diesel truck. I don't tow or anything just ride around in my redneck Cadillac looking pretty. I almost dropped 50k on a new Cummins tradesman but based on how much I drive and since I don't really stress it by towing it would be out of warranty before I needed anything done. I got rid of a 95 for my 2001 because it's easier to find parts and the pcm gives me more data in torque pro than the 95. Plus my 95 was standard cab and I wanted a back seat. I wish it was blue and our local tech school has an auto body program and I know their dean so I am hoping I can get it painted blue eventually.

Rust free except some surface rust in the bed and roof. Post some pics of your lady. Here's mine.

Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
07-30-2019 07:09 AM
Pmedic920 I have to assume most of you are guys that have owned your truck for a long time. Not a bad thing, its a simple observation.

In my particular case, I just bought my first ever diesel truck.
2000 f250 CC 7.3. 182k miles. Its a clean trk with a few minor problems.

Ive been daily driving a Jeep Unlimited Rubicon that bought new in 17. Ive upgraded a bunch of stuff to make it better off road, and I wanted to be able to trailer it to the trails. I also wanted to stop daily driving the Jeep.
Ill be driving the truck b&f to work.

Id guess that these older 7.3s vary substantially in price based on regional location. Here in the Houston Tx. area, these trks. are popular and probably priced higher than they are in many places.

I paid 12,200 and thats a little below average but the trk I got is in significantly better shape that what I found to be average.

I could have gone directly to the dealership and financed a new truck with all the bells/whistles. Easily would have been north of 50k, probably closer to 60k.

I got a decent trk at a fair price based on what I found available in my area. My wife isnt embarrassed to ride in it(and shes picky). I was able to pay cash. I feel like even though Id be above actual value, I can put another 10k into this trk and for about 1/3 of the cost of new. Thats a whole lot of playing around money left over.

Dont get me wrong, I like nice things, and a warranty is always nice. The new Trucks are beautiful (regardless of brand), and I fought with myself over the decision. But at the end of the day, I think it was a no brainer.

IMHO, this really boils down to a money issue. I/we do OK but do not flow in excess spendable money. Most people dont.
If money was no object, no way Id have bought a 20 y/o vehicle with 182k miles on it but Im happy with it. Im no mechanic but I can change parts and actually enjoy turning wrenches. Im looking forward to getting another 200k miles out of this truck, Im looking at it as another automotive hobby. Thats an aspect of the question that I wouldnt have if I had purchased new.

This forum is a wealth of information, and I appreciate yall for your contributions.
Ill be leaning heavily, yall can take that to the (figurative) bank.
07-29-2019 12:17 AM
guitarnut
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskanEngineer View Post
Alright, I normally don't chime in on the "political" sort of rants regarding these trucks, but reading this thread kind of reminded me why I love my truck and it seemed a perspective that was not yet represented. Simply put, I can work on it, even under poor/harsh conditions. Also, it is simple enough and roomy enough under the hood that field repairs can be made. Also, the design encourages me to do maintenance. Combine all those factors together, and it is exceptionally reliable. I often drive 300+ miles to nowhere, summer/winter, and I am not about to tolerate something that has high likelihood of stranding me sans the ability to fix it. I don't know anyone at AAA with HAM radio, and cell phones only work the first 30 miles or so of most of my stomping grounds.



Some might argue that an even earlier, simpler, roomier truck is for me, but I would argue that the 7.3L powerstroke from 99-2003 was the epitome of balancing power and torque with creature comforts and simplicity and reliability.



With a rigid preventative maintenance program, and going through and replacing rubber parts every 5 years, it is hard to get stranded. Carry a spare starter & alternator, a pelican case full of little misc stuff, don't ignore warning signs, etc. Send off oil for analysis at least every other oil change to watch for leaking injectors and bearings going out, and baseline the main parameters with Autoenginuity or something similar.



So, how hard is it for me to pull all my injectors, my IPR, fuel bowl, turbo, rail plugs, etc etc etc and inspect everything, finishing by swapping the o-rings & hoses once every 5 years or so? Not hard, plenty of room, and makes for a couple day winter project, which is in my nice warm garage and is generally quite pleasant. Plus I get to know more about the truck and notice other little things here and there that might be coming due for replacement. Can't say that digging under the hood of a 6.7 is similarly appealing, probably just wait for next thing to break instead of getting ahead of it. I definitely won't trust a truck to a shop when the consequences of misplaced trust are a night in a snow cave or crawling around under the truck in -40F weather.



My 7.3L has just about 320k on original injectors, and yes it is my daily driver even at -40F to -60F. Cold starting is not a problem. I added the proper modifications myself to get there, not hard, again if you like to do things yourself and make sure they are done right.



If you are what I call a Jiffy Lube owner, who takes the truck to get serviced at a stealership or similar, and has it towed to a shop when it breaks, the 7.3L may or may not be for you and a 6.7 might be a comfier option that gets you the same lifestyle.



If you are a person who has a relationship with their vehicle, and don't let others work on it, both for reliability and economics, and you can't afford breakdowns, but would rather do planned maintenance to prevent as many breakdowns as possible, the 7.3L is probably the one for you.



Of course, to every rule and stereotype, there are exceptions, to each their own, not saying everyone needs to think like me, but consider this food for thought.
I don't see 6.7 maintenance as a possibility for a weekend warrior. You are tied to the stealership. This is why I originally mentioned the new Cummins. They look much we easier to work on than the 6.7. part of why I kept the 7.3 is just that. I don't do much work other than small stuff myself (oil changes, filters, etc) but the local shops can all do 7.3s.

Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
07-27-2019 02:18 PM
AlaskanEngineer Alright, I normally don't chime in on the "political" sort of rants regarding these trucks, but reading this thread kind of reminded me why I love my truck and it seemed a perspective that was not yet represented. Simply put, I can work on it, even under poor/harsh conditions. Also, it is simple enough and roomy enough under the hood that field repairs can be made. Also, the design encourages me to do maintenance. Combine all those factors together, and it is exceptionally reliable. I often drive 300+ miles to nowhere, summer/winter, and I am not about to tolerate something that has high likelihood of stranding me sans the ability to fix it. I don't know anyone at AAA with HAM radio, and cell phones only work the first 30 miles or so of most of my stomping grounds.

Some might argue that an even earlier, simpler, roomier truck is for me, but I would argue that the 7.3L powerstroke from 99-2003 was the epitome of balancing power and torque with creature comforts and simplicity and reliability.

With a rigid preventative maintenance program, and going through and replacing rubber parts every 5 years, it is hard to get stranded. Carry a spare starter & alternator, a pelican case full of little misc stuff, don't ignore warning signs, etc. Send off oil for analysis at least every other oil change to watch for leaking injectors and bearings going out, and baseline the main parameters with Autoenginuity or something similar.

So, how hard is it for me to pull all my injectors, my IPR, fuel bowl, turbo, rail plugs, etc etc etc and inspect everything, finishing by swapping the o-rings & hoses once every 5 years or so? Not hard, plenty of room, and makes for a couple day winter project, which is in my nice warm garage and is generally quite pleasant. Plus I get to know more about the truck and notice other little things here and there that might be coming due for replacement. Can't say that digging under the hood of a 6.7 is similarly appealing, probably just wait for next thing to break instead of getting ahead of it. I definitely won't trust a truck to a shop when the consequences of misplaced trust are a night in a snow cave or crawling around under the truck in -40F weather.

My 7.3L has just about 320k on original injectors, and yes it is my daily driver even at -40F to -60F. Cold starting is not a problem. I added the proper modifications myself to get there, not hard, again if you like to do things yourself and make sure they are done right.

If you are what I call a Jiffy Lube owner, who takes the truck to get serviced at a stealership or similar, and has it towed to a shop when it breaks, the 7.3L may or may not be for you and a 6.7 might be a comfier option that gets you the same lifestyle.

If you are a person who has a relationship with their vehicle, and don't let others work on it, both for reliability and economics, and you can't afford breakdowns, but would rather do planned maintenance to prevent as many breakdowns as possible, the 7.3L is probably the one for you.

Of course, to every rule and stereotype, there are exceptions, to each their own, not saying everyone needs to think like me, but consider this food for thought.
07-26-2019 10:16 AM
greenskeeper Some dope at my work just bought a used 6.7 to "occasionally" tow. By "occasionally" I mean the truck he replaced with the 6.7 was driven 7,000 miles in 11 years. Yeah....good luck with that lawn ornament that's costing you $600/month.
07-26-2019 05:38 AM
Jjorgis5569 To each their own really. Without people buying new, there wouldnt be a used market. The last new vehicle I bought was in 1999. The thought of spending money on anything, especially something that depreciates is against my way of thinking, but a vehicle is a necessity in the US. I pay cash for everything, but I hate payments. After reading the what did you pay for thread, Id be hard pressed to shell out 70k unless I absolutely had to. However I dont fault anyone for doing so. We have a 350z that hasnt seen 200 miles in the past 5 years. She typically just gets driven to town for a state inspection and registration sticker. Some people could start a thread saying why would you buy a car and not drive it? To each their own. Theres a saying in the car business-theres an a$$ for every seat.
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