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6.0L Performance Parts Discussion What has or has not worked for you?

Thread: My 6.7 fuel pump install Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
05-23-2019 06:56 AM
Smackdaddy53 I bought most if my fittings from Getfast1
The hard line fittings are compression fittings and I had the 1/2” stainless tubing already.

Fittings for the sending unit were 2 90 degree 8AN bulkhead fittings and buy a set of teflon washers for them.

The compression fittings are on their drop down menu under “aluminum line and fittings” get the 8AN/1/2” ones.
05-23-2019 06:27 AM
pstrang
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smackdaddy53 View Post
Go cheaper, there’s no need for a 5/8” pickup. I bought one and sent it back because you would spend as much in adapter fittings to drop from 5/8” to 1/2” than the pickup cost.
I used 8AN (1/2”) 90 degree bulkhead fittings then 8AN to 1/2” hard line fittings and cut a stainless tube for each of them. The return needs to have an angle on it like the factory one and the feed should be cut to fit about 3/8-1/2” from the bottom of the tank. Screw on 1/2” pushloks on these and run your feed and return.
Thanks for the advice. Gearing up for this 6.7L pump install, I don't know 'fittings' and such. So I looked for aftermarket because I don't know how to join a custom-cut tube to the bulkhead fitting. Is there some compression fit? Does it get welded? Completely clueless here.

Thanks!
05-23-2019 04:11 AM
Smackdaddy53 Go cheaper, there’s no need for a 5/8” pickup. I bought one and sent it back because you would spend as much in adapter fittings to drop from 5/8” to 1/2” than the pickup cost.
I used 8AN (1/2”) 90 degree bulkhead fittings then 8AN to 1/2” hard line fittings and cut a stainless tube for each of them. The return needs to have an angle on it like the factory one and the feed should be cut to fit about 3/8-1/2” from the bottom of the tank. Screw on 1/2” pushloks on these and run your feed and return.
Sumps are overrated. When I was researching and looking at other 6.7 fuel pump installs on people’s trucks I heard a lot of “if you build this fuel system you have to use a sump” but that’s BS. HP Machine and I made ours using the sending unit method and they work flawlessly. I have an article from Strictly Diesel that further reinforces this theory. I spoke with them and they referred me to this link:

LARGE PICKUP TUBE VS SUMP:
Many of the high volume fuel pump configurations that we have discussed in this document REQUIRE a larger than stock fuel supply line from the fuel tank to the pump. The current trend in the diesel performance community would seem to suggest that fuel tank sumps are better than large pickup tubes (sometimes called “drawstraws”), but there are some important factors to consider in making this decision. Just because every diesel performance shop makes and sells a sump, doesn’t mean that they are the best or right solution for your fuel system needs.
Fuel tank sumps were originally developed to resolve the “quarter tank” problem that became associated with large pickup tubes. In reality, most of the quarter tank issues were created by the improper installation of the pickup tube in the fuel tank, if the tube was cut too short, and the bottom of the tube wasn’t close enough to the bottom of the fuel tank, the quarter tank issues would arise. We have sold and used large fuel tank pickup tubes for years without any significant quarter tank problems being reported by our customers.
The advantage of an aftermarket sump is that it becomes a “low point” in the fuel tank, essentially a cup with straight sides that is full of fuel that can’t easily “slosh away” from the pickup point under low fuel level braking or cornering conditions. This will certainly eliminate the “quarter tank” issue, and may even allow you to continue running the truck for a period of time after the fuel level gauge has reached EMPTY. It should be noted that running the tank this low is NOT RECOMMENDED because a significantly low fuel level in the tank coupled with fuel slosh and a high volume pump can lead to the sump being drained and the pickup point being uncovered.
Unless the fuel pump is mounted BELOW the sump outlet, there are no other advantages to using a sump. There is a misconception that using a sump makes it easier for your fuel pump to pull fuel from the tank, or that using a sump “fixes” the problems with some aftermarket pump failures. If you have mounted your fuel pump along the centerline of the frame rail, then a good portion of the fuel in the tank is below the inlet of the pump. This means that your pump will still be drawing fuel against gravity any time the fuel level is lower than the inlet of the pump. Another common method for mounting aftermarket fuel pumps is to put them between a pair of filter heads. Since the filter heads with filters installed are relatively tall, this method tends to locate the pump much closer to the floor of the truck than the centerline of the frame, placing it above more of the fuel in the tank and further negating the supposed “gravity feed” advantage of using a sump. In a nutshell, the “ease of suction” advantage of a sump diminishes more as the level of the pump inlet rises.
There are some disadvantages to running a sump configuration that also need to be carefully considered. Your goals and how you use the truck will be as important to this decision as they were in selecting the fuel pump. Trucks that are driven daily, spend a lot of time on the highway or spend a lot of time “off-road” may want to consider the risk involved with having an aluminum sump attached to a plastic fuel tank with a large diameter fuel supply hose...all hanging down under the middle of the truck where it can get hit by debris. A fuel leak on the bottom of the fuel tank, particularly considering the size of the hole in the tank and the size of the fuel line normally used with a sump, would be a very significant concern! Best case scenario, you might just be left stranded on the side of the road with an empty fuel tank and a broken hose. Worst case, consider what might happen if a large amount of fuel were to dump under your tires or those of another motorist at highway speed. These are obviously not situations that occur regularly, but they are realistic possibilities that need to be considered based on reliability concerns and how you use your truck.
Last Updated: 7/2/2018 Page 5 of 8 © S Diesel, LLC

Large fuel tank pickup tubes still remain the safest way to properly plumb a high volume fuel pump into one of these trucks. Because they are mounted on top of the tank, and the fuel line is located above the tank and along the frame rail of the truck, the pickup and fuel line have much better protection from anything that might get kicked up on the road or encountered on the trail. If you have significant concerns about “quarter tank” issues, a large pickup tube can be combined with a sump to give you the best of both worlds. The current Driven Diesel 5/8” Fuel Tank Pickup Tube is produced with enough extra length to allow it to be fitted over the middle of a fuel tank sump so that it is always picking up fuel from the lowest point in the tank. FASS also makes a very nice Sump Kit that includes a 5/8” flexible pickup tube that picks up in the bottom of the sump. There would still be a risk of something on the road or trail catching the sump, but there would be no hoses along the bottom of the tank that could be easily damaged.

At the end of the day, any of these solutions (if properly installed) will do a fine job of supplying your new high volume fuel pump. We are not intending to make a case for or against any of these solutions, as we do offer all of them to our customers. We just want you to be aware of the potential issues with each of them so that you can make an informed decision that isn’t based on the “latest fad” or “internet hype”.
05-22-2019 09:00 PM
pstrang I live on a dirt road in the mountains. I'm nervous about cutting my fuel tank skid plate for a sump. What do you guys think about this: FASS Suction Tube Kit (5/8") (site won't let me post the link; please google them). 5/8" pickup, 1/2" return.

Thanks!
05-10-2019 01:15 PM
DDD Some more pics of process
05-10-2019 01:12 PM
DDD Was able to use both OEM fuel filters with my 6.7 Fuel Pump Swap. Still need to button the lines up and wire the pump in with factory pigtails and a Mercury Marine Relay Kit.
05-10-2019 02:46 AM
Redbliss Gotcha. Thanks bud
05-09-2019 07:59 PM
HP MACHINE
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redbliss View Post
Glad to see you got it all put back together. Mine has been back for a little over a month now and unfortunately I have to tear it all back down again! I hve exhaust gases in my degas bottle and a lot of pressure when I undo the cap when the motor is cold before start up. Tried a new cap and it blows out after about 20 minutes of driving. Its been studded since 2013 and around 80k since. Any suggestions for o ringed heads. I don't want to do this again!
I'm completely useless for pictures and links - lol , but there's a good thread on here with suggestions
on numerous head options . Also great input on head gaskets .
It ( the thread ) should still be near the top . Check it out .
05-09-2019 07:12 PM
Redbliss Glad to see you got it all put back together. Mine has been back for a little over a month now and unfortunately I have to tear it all back down again! I hve exhaust gases in my degas bottle and a lot of pressure when I undo the cap when the motor is cold before start up. Tried a new cap and it blows out after about 20 minutes of driving. Its been studded since 2013 and around 80k since. Any suggestions for o ringed heads. I don't want to do this again!
05-09-2019 05:38 AM
Smackdaddy53 Got it all installed and buttoning up the engine after having it out to swap to UCF heads and reseal a few items. I guess I’ll keep this thread alive. I appreciate all the info, I got more from this site than anywhere.
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