Snow tires - Ford Powerstroke Diesel Forum
 2Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 12 Old 10-18-2019, 06:26 AM Thread Starter
Powerstroke.org Rookie
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 2
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Snow tires

Hi guys, longtime lurker first time poster. I have a 2005 cclb srw 2wd. Had it maybe 4 years. At first I would just switch to a beater in the winter since it was so worthless in snow with a thousand pound engine and such a long wheelbase. Now I'm traveling and need to make a decision on freshening up this unit or trading up. Not that I wouldn't love a 6.7 with 4wd, I just like owning my truck instead of the bank. Anyone tried winter tires on a unit like this in the Midwest and had acceptable results?
Thanks in advance
MightyKC is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 12 Old 10-18-2019, 06:44 AM
Serving Our Country!

 
JustinOOO9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 7,722
Thanks: 371
Thanked 648 Times in 599 Posts
Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Quoted: 1576 Post(s)
Garage
Feedback Score: 3 reviews
I would not waste the money on a set of dedicated winter tires. A winter rated/ M+S all terrain would be leaps and bounds a head of the typical all season/highway tires on these trucks. I run the BFG AT2 on my 1999 f250 and we see 60+inches of snow and -25 degrees for a good chunk of one month. I run general grabber at2s on the wifes Subaru.

Like you mentioned the biggest issue is the engine/empty bed. Throw a few hundred pounds in the bed and it will help. I strapped 100lbs worth of material in the back of my 2wd I had in highschool (little Toyota with 5pd) the weight alone was a big improvement.

Granted a set of studded winter tires will yield the best results but that you have to store them in the summer. I did that for one winter and the winter tires were good but the all terrain tires were nicer because all I did was rortate them. no more swapping sets every season.


BFGoodrich at2, General Grabber at2, Yokohoma Geolander at g105, Toyo Open country, (not a fan of nittos previous AT tires personally. ran them on two trucks and meh), Cooper discover stt max (although its a mt classification its tread design is very similar to an AT and very popular for plow trucks in my area.

-99 F250, 4X4, 6.0 trans cooler, 08 mirrors, 05 grill, AIS Intake, lvl kit, JW Vbody, cncfab hpop lines, WW2.

04 Excursion Modified, 04 F350 Modified, 06 F350 Modified

Interested in learning something new?


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Justin
JustinOOO9 is online now  
post #3 of 12 Old 10-18-2019, 06:51 AM
Compression Ignition Addict
 
MrTommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Carson City, NV
Posts: 276
Thanks: 2
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Quoted: 67 Post(s)
Garage
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Back when I had a 2wd pickup I just carried a set of chains - good chains. Never got stuck. But I'm not sure what the laws back in the Midwest are regarding chains. I remember when I was growing up in Chicago in the 60's, the city did not allow chains - probably because they tear up the pavement. But out West (I'm in Nevada) there are many times when signs pop up saying "Chains Required". Even though I have a 4wd pickup, I don't use snow tires, or even off road tires. I tow an RV and use highway tires all the time. Since I'm retired now, if it's snowing and there's not an emergency I don't even open the front door - ha. But I do carry a set of good chains during the winter months - just in case.

With your front axle weighing 3-4k and your rear axle much less (unless you carry lots of junk in the back - like I do - ahem), traction could be a problem. But you already know that, right?
Hydro likes this.
MrTommy is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 12 Old 10-18-2019, 07:10 AM
Member
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 88
Thanks: 2
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
I disagree with Justin. A good set of winter specific tires will be leaps and bounds better than a set of anything with just a m+s label slapped on them. M+S tires are great for 4wd trucks but a 2wd really needs a dedicated winter tire along with 500 lbs of load in the bed. On my 2wd gasser whenever it snowed I would load the bed with snow from my driveway and it never got stuck that truck has transforce ht.
ugly96 is offline  
post #5 of 12 Old 10-18-2019, 08:06 AM Thread Starter
Powerstroke.org Rookie
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 2
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Thank you for the help guys! I usually do the shovel the snow in the bed trick already, you have to shovel it somewhere and then the problem becomes it's own solution. This truck definitely has highway mileage tires on it. The previous owner bought them right before selling and I didn't want to waste them.

If you guys are saying snow tires are worth a shot it would be less than one payment on a new truck. Plus I hate to get nothing for trade and I'd have nowhere to put this vehicle if I had a new one. I'll start shopping for snow tires.
Thank you for the input!
MightyKC is offline  
post #6 of 12 Old 10-18-2019, 08:58 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Palmer
Posts: 45
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
From the tires I've had experience with, I really like the cooper discoverer M+S studded and sypped. They get crazy good traction.
People have already mentioned weight in the bed. In my 87 ranger I'd put 400lbs of sand bags in the bed even though it is a 4x4 and that improved traction a lot.
Hydro likes this.
Alaska diesel is offline  
post #7 of 12 Old 10-18-2019, 09:00 AM
Compression Ignition Addict
 
The Evil Twin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 777
Thanks: 20
Thanked 27 Times in 26 Posts
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Quoted: 159 Post(s)
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Your differential is another thing to consider. An open diff will spin the tire with the least traction. Adding an inexpensive locker (Aussie, Ox, whatever) helps tremendously.
The Evil Twin is offline  
post #8 of 12 Old 10-18-2019, 09:08 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Palmer
Posts: 45
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Evil Twin View Post
Your differential is another thing to consider. An open diff will spin the tire with the least traction. Adding an inexpensive locker (Aussie, Ox, whatever) helps tremendously.
Keep in mind though that with a the dif locked your rear end will whip around a lot quicker.
Alaska diesel is offline  
post #9 of 12 Old 10-18-2019, 09:17 AM
Compression Ignition Addict
 
MrTommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Carson City, NV
Posts: 276
Thanks: 2
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Quoted: 67 Post(s)
Garage
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
I must add that when I was growing up in Chicago (as mentioned above) I always had a set of "Snow Tires" mounted on some junk wheels that I swapped on and off with the coming and going of the season. It used to snow a LOT, and they were well worth the money, and the effort to swap them out every year. These were used on the old hot rod "muscle cars", not pickups. Pickups were not cool back then, at least not in the 'big city'. Snow tires made the difference between getting stuck and not getting stuck. And beating other non-snow tire cars from 'green lights' -
MrTommy is offline  
post #10 of 12 Old 10-18-2019, 09:27 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Palmer
Posts: 45
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrTommy View Post
I must add that when I was growing up in Chicago (as mentioned above) I always had a set of "Snow Tires" mounted on some junk wheels that I swapped on and off with the coming and going of the season. It used to snow a LOT, and they were well worth the money, and the effort to swap them out every year. These were used on the old hot rod "muscle cars", not pickups. Pickups were not cool back then, at least not in the 'big city'. Snow tires made the difference between getting stuck and not getting stuck. And beating other non-snow tire cars from 'green lights' -
Yes having another set of rims is the way to go for sure. Saves time and money in the long run.
Alaska diesel is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Ford Powerstroke Diesel Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome