turning up the fuel... - Page 2 - Ford Powerstroke Diesel Forum
7.3L IDI (Non-Powerstroke) Diesels Technical discussion of topics related to vehicles powered by the 7.3 Liter In-Direct Injection Navistar engines.

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post #11 of 22 Old 02-09-2009, 07:35 PM
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I thought you could do a fpr shim mod on the 7.3s which turned up the pressure?
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post #12 of 22 Old 02-10-2009, 06:42 AM
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Originally Posted by southern7.3 View Post
I thought you could do a fpr shim mod on the 7.3s which turned up the pressure?
Yes that is true. It roughly bumps it to around 75 psi too high and you will blow out gaskets.
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post #13 of 22 Old 04-12-2009, 01:48 PM
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What should you look to keep the EGTs around? At what point is it too much for the engine?
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post #14 of 22 Old 04-13-2009, 01:15 PM
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Keep them below 1200* at the exhaust manifold. Dont linger above 1200* for a long period of time. Others go higher, but aluminum has a melting point around 1200*, and thats what your pistons are made of, so I wouldnt go much higher than that for a long period of time.
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post #15 of 22 Old 04-14-2009, 08:48 PM
 
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Location For Pyro

I have a 1994 IDI factory turbo and I might like to do this too.

What is a recommended location for a pyro on this engine?

It's got bigger exhaust but a factory downpipe.

I'd prefer to put it post turbo but that doesn't seem as easy on this engine as on my cummins.

I've heard tell of the end breaking or failing and destroying the turbo...

Don't mean to hijack the thread but it seems that one topic leads to the next.

I didn't search through posts for this yet but would be happy to read any links anyone is aware of.
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post #16 of 22 Old 04-14-2009, 09:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ne_plus_ultra_1 View Post
I have a 1994 IDI factory turbo and I might like to do this too.

What is a recommended location for a pyro on this engine?

It's got bigger exhaust but a factory downpipe.

I'd prefer to put it post turbo but that doesn't seem as easy on this engine as on my cummins.

I've heard tell of the end breaking or failing and destroying the turbo...

Don't mean to hijack the thread but it seems that one topic leads to the next.

I didn't search through posts for this yet but would be happy to read any links anyone is aware of.
Do not put the probe post turbo. You might as well not even put one in if you are gonna do that. By the time you hit 1200 post turbo, your preturbo temps are probably pushin 1600 or more. You want the probe in the exhaust manifold as close to the engine as possible. I have never heard of a probe breaking off and destroying a turbo. Look around on this site at all the guys that are running with the probe pre turbo, and none of them have had one break off.

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Originally Posted by alberta 7.3 View Post
Yeah, I'd probably feel a bit drained after firing twice in rapid succession.
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post #17 of 22 Old 04-14-2009, 09:13 PM
 
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Fair enough but is there a thread with instructions for an IDI turbo?

What I have always done in my Cummins is take an extended run at steady RPM and get out my IR temp gun and them shoot the manifold and get a rough idea of what the temps are that way. I'm usually way way lower than 1200.

Last edited by ne_plus_ultra_1; 04-14-2009 at 09:15 PM. Reason: more data
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post #18 of 22 Old 04-14-2009, 09:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ne_plus_ultra_1 View Post
Fair enough but is there a thread with instructions for an IDI turbo?

What I have always done in my Cummins is take an extended run at steady RPM and get out my IR temp gun and them shoot the manifold and get a rough idea of what the temps are that way. I'm usually way way lower than 1200.
You don't really need instructions, just drill and tap the manifold with the proper thread for the probe you are using.

Thats a terrible way to determine your EGT's. All thats gonna do is tell you what your exhaust manifold temp is on the outside of it when you are running at steady rpm. You will be way lower than 1200 because you haven't really ran it hard, and if you did it would have cooled down below that by the time you stop and get out your gun. You need a guage if you are gonna up the power, cause the temps inside the manifold are hotter than the outside and you need to know as its happening, not after you have already stopped.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by alberta 7.3 View Post
Yeah, I'd probably feel a bit drained after firing twice in rapid succession.
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post #19 of 22 Old 04-14-2009, 09:31 PM
 
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Nope.

It doesn't lose degrees that quick. I have tested how quick temps go down and it only takes about 15 seconds to stop and get under the hood. Cast iron also transmits heat quite well.

While I do agree that it is not instantly accurate or indicative of spikes or running it hard or under heavy load, it is certainly indicative of the temps during the types of driving that I do.

The guys on the Cummins forum seem much more specific about exact locations, thick areas of the manifold, areas that lead to potential cracking and areas that catch flow from the most cylinders, procedures that allow near zero shavings to pass through the turbo... I don't really like the "wing-it-and-drill" approach, sorry.

Now, when I do up the power in the Cummins, I will likely install a pyro gauge. I spoke with one fellow who has don it so many times on so many Cummins that with a certain configuration (that seems suitable to my needs) he doesn't bother with them because he feels he knows exactly what temps they run. I'll probably still put one in.
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post #20 of 22 Old 04-14-2009, 09:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ne_plus_ultra_1 View Post
Nope.

It doesn't lose degrees that quick. I have tested how quick temps go down and it only takes about 15 seconds to stop and get under the hood. Cast iron also transmits heat quite well.

Its still not gonna show you what the exact temps of the gasses running through the manifold are.

While I do agree that it is not instantly accurate or indicative of spikes or running it hard or under heavy load, it is certainly indicative of the temps during the types of driving that I do.

While under normal easy driving that may be effective, you wont need a pyro under those circumstances. Its very possible though, that the first time you run it hard with the power turned up and no pyro that you destroy your engine.

The guys on the Cummins forum seem much more specific about exact locations, thick areas of the manifold, areas that lead to potential cracking and areas that catch flow from the most cylinders, procedures that allow near zero shavings to pass through the turbo... I don't really like the "wing-it-and-drill" approach, sorry.

Its not really "winging it." Just pick an area as close to the engine as possible, and low as possible on the manifold and drill it. If done right you should get none or at most minimal shavings in the turbo. What i did was drilled mine, then took a shopvac to the hole and sucked out all the shavings, any that would happen to have been left in there after that would be so small that they would just simply pass through the turbo.

Now, when I do up the power in the Cummins, I will likely install a pyro gauge. I spoke with one fellow who has don it so many times on so many Cummins that with a certain configuration (that seems suitable to my needs) he doesn't bother with them because he feels he knows exactly what temps they run. I'll probably still put one in.

He feels he knows exactly what the temps are with no gauge? What a moron. That has got to be one of the dumbest ideas i've ever heard regarding exhaust temps. Without a gauge there is NO WAY to accurately tell what the EGT's are. Unless he is only adding 5 HP there is no way that is a good idea. Even stock its still not a bad idea to have one. It can alert you of a problem before it destroys the motor completely.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alberta 7.3 View Post
Yeah, I'd probably feel a bit drained after firing twice in rapid succession.
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