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Old 06-30-2013, 12:15 PM
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Tire Loading Chart

I read on RV forums about tire loading charts, which show proper air pressure for a certain weight. I've searched but can't find those for LT tires.
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Old 06-30-2013, 02:00 PM
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I'm not sure where you are going with this, but most tires have a load rating (D, E, etc) and/or a max weight for said tire. For example, the D rated 365 Toyos that I used to run were Load Range D, but had a higher max weight than the Load Range D 315 BFGs I replaced them with.
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Old 06-30-2013, 02:05 PM
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I don't think he is talking about the load rating for the tires, but rather what the actual desired psi for a certain loads weight is.
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Old 06-30-2013, 02:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rattlesnake18 View Post
I don't think he is talking about the load rating for the tires, but rather what the actual desired psi for a certain loads weight is.
Correct.
Say for 3500lbs on an axle, that is, theoretically, 1750lbs on each tire. For a specific tire, the mfg says the tire should be at 55PSI for 1750lbs.
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Old 06-30-2013, 02:53 PM
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That is correct, that's also a good example of why tires say MAX PSI on the sidewall. If you are trying to find the best psi for max tread wear, a piece of chalk works, but only on new tires. You run the chalk across the tire then see how it wears off for a given psi. On worn tires, all you're really doing is finding what psi supports why the center has less tread depth than the outer.
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Old 06-30-2013, 02:56 PM
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Proper Tire Inflation
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Old 06-30-2013, 05:15 PM
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I understand how to check with chalk, done it before.
I'm wondering if there's charts for LT tires.
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Old 06-30-2013, 08:27 PM
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Someone did a chart up over on TDS ages ago for a specific tire size. I haven't seen it since. you should be able to make your own though... if you have easy access to a scale, ballast, and a plethora of chalk & compressed air. Just load each axel in whatever increments you want up to the max GAWR and use the chalk method to find the appropriate pressures. Time consuming, but you'll know exactly what your truck needs.
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Old 07-01-2013, 05:31 AM
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I think it's worth mentioning that wheel width plays a part in tread wear/psi requirements. For example, when I put my 285s on a 10" wheel, I got a better tread contact with more psi as compared to when they were on 8" wheels.

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Old 07-01-2013, 12:25 PM
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town fair tire installed the wrong toyo mt on my truck.. now 7,000 miles later they are putting brand new set of 37's on my truck since the 35's are on nation back order for 90 days.. if i dont like the 37s theyll put the 35's what are the right weight load.

SO MAKE SURE YOU GUYS CHECK!!!!!!!! i called toyo direct and they called town fair to do it..
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