Pulled a s175 bobcat.. - Ford Powerstroke Diesel Forum
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Old 05-09-2013, 04:10 PM
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Pulled a s175 bobcat..

I know pull in a s175 bobcat is nothing special, but dang it squatted my truck!! I had an extra leaf put in the rear for pulling but it still squatted it where the from of the truck was higher than the front. My truck came from Ohio so it had some rust but I'm only running one worn out rusted shock in the rear, then other side shock mount on the frame is rusted off. Would shocks help? And how hard is it to replace shock mounts? The truck done good pulling but when I hit a bump I thought it I was gonna fling off the road. Lol. Sometimes I wish I had a 4 door 4wd dually...
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Old 05-09-2013, 04:15 PM
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This is a pic of it loaded up. If it will upload...
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Pulled a s175 bobcat..-img_20130509_100514_814.jpg  
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Old 05-09-2013, 04:18 PM
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I don't think the squat is that bad, yes!! shocks will help eliminate the hop from rough roads! the will not help the squat unless you get special (more expensive) shocks..
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Old 05-09-2013, 04:21 PM
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It's not squatting as much as the newer F250s squat. The shock mounts would be very easy for you to weld on yourself. You could rig up your own with some clamps and bolts if you don't want to weld. For the shock mounts, you don't have to fully weld them...just spot weld and you don't have to worry about getting the axle too hot.

Shocks won't make much of a difference for the squat but your truck will feel like a new one if you DO put some new shocks on it.

I suggest getting some Firestone airbags for the rear. Cheap and easy to install. $300 shipped. Your truck will never squat again.
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Old 05-09-2013, 05:31 PM
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Its the upper shock mounts on the frame that's rusted off. They are like $11 a piece and they bolt on. I just didn't know how hard it would be since they are on the inside of the frame. The picture makes it look better than it actually was. With the hop it had I wouldn't feel comfortable puling it very much farther than I did today which was less than a mile down the road. Lol. I thought about bags but I didn't have the money at the time. But I'm definitely doing new shocks.
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Old 08-01-2013, 05:26 AM
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the counter weight and the engine are in front of the front trailer axle, i'm guessing you are loaded very tongue heavy. running without shocks/wornout, will shake the rest of the truck apart and cost you even more money.
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Old 08-11-2013, 10:34 PM
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You dont got too much tongue weight. The heaviest part of the skid steer is behind the back wheels. This is so the machine can carry a heavy load in the front and still be balanced. Next time load the skid head first and put the back of the machine in line with the back axle on the trailer. If in doubt about the tongue weight, have someone watch the rear leaf springs as you load the machine. (or vice versa) As the machine is loaded you will see the springs get "unloaded" as the trailer tongue "lifts" the rear end of the truck up. (Make note of the stock position of the springs before loading.) As the the machine moves over the balance point on the trailer, the springs will slowly return to the stock position and then start to sag into the loaded position. Keep going until the truck sits level. Thats why these trucks all have that nose down lean to them. When properly loaded the truck should ride level. Too much tongue weight can actually reduce the traction the front tires have and affect your steering. Remember the 10% tongue weight rule is only a guide line, and the best tongue weight varies greatly upon the trailer design, load, and truck. Even though your not sagging too much in the rear, put as much weight on the trailer as safely possible. Better to wear out the trailer than the truck. (trailer parts and tires are a lot cheaper!)

Last edited by kepalo; 08-11-2013 at 10:39 PM.
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Old 08-15-2013, 12:33 PM
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Re position your load and it will help. It would help if you turned the loader around. That way you can get the weight of the loader more centered over the axles. I pull these things around daily. Once you find a sweet spot mark the trailer somehow to make loading easier.
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Old 08-15-2013, 06:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 5fifty View Post
Re position your load and it will help. It would help if you turned the loader around. That way you can get the weight of the loader more centered over the axles. I pull these things around daily. Once you find a sweet spot mark the trailer somehow to make loading easier.
I do the same thing when I haul cars in my 24 ft enclosed, I've got the floor marked where certain cars go to have them loaded just right.


The other thing to remember is you're doing this with a short wheel base truck, it would handle different with a longer wheelbase.
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