Report: 2011 Ford Super Duty to Get New 6.7-Liter Power Stroke V8 - Ford Powerstroke Diesel Forum
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Old 08-31-2009, 10:34 AM
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Report: 2011 Ford Super Duty to Get New 6.7-Liter Power Stroke V8


Ford is set to release a revolutionary new 6.7-liter Power Stroke turbo-diesel engine for its line of Super Duty F-Series trucks in 2011. The all-new engine promises a, “significant improvement in torque, horsepower and fuel economy,” says Ford in a press release, stating that this new F-Series Super Duty would continue to be a class leader in both payload and towing.

Numerous high-tech innovations have been employed in building this new engine, starting with a compacted graphite iron (CGI) engine block that Ford says is twice as strong as standard iron blocks. This was deemed necessary due to the increases in power output.

The new engine makes use of a Honeywell single variable turbine turbo (similar to the one found on the Porsche 911 Turbo), but takes turbo technology a step further still. Instead of one, there are two compressor wheels driven off a single turbine impeller, working like a bi-turbo setup that gives the engine a fast response time with little lag as well as the power of a larger turbo.

Visually, the new engine looks remarkably different, due to the fact that the intake and exhaust systems are the reverse of a conventional engine. The exhaust manifolds sit in the valley of the big V8 engine, while the intake manifold is on the outside. This means the cylinder heads are essentially flipped around.

By significantly reducing the amount of exhaust piping, lag is reduced considerably. Additionally, this new packaging moves the hotter elements of the engine (like the turbocharger and exhaust pipes) away from the intake areas, ensuring a constant supply of cool air to the engine. And as for that turbo, it sits in the valley between the cylinder banks. Due to its location, spool up is considerably faster and the engine's overall balance is improved. Another major benefit of this setup is that that cab no longer has to be removed from the frame if work needs to be done on the turbo. The fuel-pump, EGR (exhaust gas recirculation) components and the thermostats are also easily accessible from the front of the vehicle.

Ford hasn't released any specifics on the new engine but if out scientific and sophisticated brains have understood all this talk of a sequential variable turbine geometry turbo correctly, our power-loving neanderthal brains are in for a real treat when this new package makes it to market.

More: Report: 2011 Ford Super Duty to Get New 6.7-Liter Power Stroke V8 on AutoGuide.com
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Old 08-31-2009, 11:32 AM
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This is gonna be awesome!!! I cant wait to see what can be done with these!
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Old 08-31-2009, 11:46 AM
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And we complain about DPF's on '08-'10 trucks!!!

Quote:
Step One: Cleaning and Heating – The first step in cleaning the diesel exhaust occurs when the exhaust stream enters the Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC). The role of the DOC is twofold. First, it converts and oxidizes hydrocarbons into water and carbon dioxide. This conversion happens at about 250 degrees Celsius.

Second, the DOC is used to provide and promote heat, using specific engine management strategies, into the exhaust system. Through appropriate thermal management, this heat increases the conversion efficiency of the downstream subsystem(s) in reducing emissions.

Step Two: Knocking Out the NOx – The next step in the process is what’s known as Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR). In this process, the NOx in the exhaust stream is converted into water and inert nitrogen, which is present in the atmosphere and harmless. Before the exhaust gas enters the SCR chamber, it is dosed with DEF, an aqueous solution that is approximately 67.5 percent water and 32.5 percent pure urea.

When heated, the DEF splits into ammonia and carbon dioxide. These molecules are atomized, and vaporized, then enter a mixer that resembles a corkscrew. This twist mixer evenly distributes the ammonia within the exhaust flow. The ammonia enters the SCR module, which contains a catalyzed substrate, and through chemical reactions combines and converts the NOx and ammonia into the harmless inert nitrogen and water. Dosing occurs between 200 and 500 degrees Celsius.

Step Three: Scrubbing Away the Soot – The final part of the cleansing system for the diesel exhaust gas involves the Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF). The DPF traps any remaining soot, which is then periodically burned away, known as regenerating, when sensors detect the trap is full. The regeneration process sees temperatures in excess of 600 degrees Celsius to burn away soot.
However, if I was a betting man, I would bet saying this engine having 400hp/700tq would be on the conservative side!

Last edited by Shadrack; 08-31-2009 at 12:11 PM.
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Old 08-31-2009, 01:25 PM
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I just wanna see what Ford can produce...........
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Old 08-31-2009, 01:28 PM
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Man...2011 ill be needing a new truck by then..Cant wait!
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Old 08-31-2009, 01:32 PM
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Finally some real news to help us 6.4 Owners know there is something much better lurking down the road!
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Old 08-31-2009, 03:11 PM
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This may be just what I have been waiting for!
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Old 08-31-2009, 03:13 PM
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Originally Posted by RRonning1984 View Post
This may be just what I have been waiting for!
what ever you do..............






























don't get rid of the 7.3L
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Old 08-31-2009, 03:23 PM
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I work for ford, and that engine is pritty sweet. I wouldnt git rid of my 7.3 to git the 6.7. I would love to coment more on it but I cant.
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Old 08-31-2009, 03:28 PM
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Originally Posted by kmesaeh View Post
I work for ford, and that engine is pritty sweet. I wouldnt git rid of my 7.3 to git the 6.7. I would love to coment more on it but I cant.
the hell if you can't... you don't work for the gov't... and no I woulnd't ever get rid the 7.3L... but if I had the extra money and waited a year or two.... then I would
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