SAND in framerail filter?? Southern thing? - Ford Powerstroke Diesel Forum
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Old 04-03-2013, 09:07 AM
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SAND in framerail filter?? Southern thing?

So I was having my EGR delete installed yesterday and I had the shop put in new fuel filters as well as I had not had a chance to replace them since I bought the truck out of Baton Rouge, LA 2 weeks ago. The guy said there was literally sand coming out. Like mixed in with the water/fuel. Is this common in trucks down along that area of the country? The truck had the HPFP replaced a back in November when it got on the dealers lot (I bought it in March off ebay). I talked to the mechanic who did it and I asked very specific questions about contaminated fuel, bad injectors, etc and he said the fuel looked good and his IDS showed no issues with injectors. I've also had the injectors checked via IDS up here in Ohio and they are all within tolerance on pressure etc. I guess my question is is their typically sediment/sand in fuel down south??? The top filter looked great. I'm wondering if the knucklehead that owned it before ever changed the bottom one? The shop tech told me literally beach sand came out of the bottom of the separator and the filter looked black.

what do you all think?
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Old 04-03-2013, 09:24 AM
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Well I was born and spent my first 33 years there. I hate to tell you, but it sound like you may have river silt and not sand. If that is the case you either have a truck that someone liked to go play in the mud and high water, someone filled up at a station that had tanks flooded, or you may have a flood truck. Take some hard to get to areas apart and see if you see it there too.

Flooding is very common in South Louisiana. When it floods the river silt gets everywhere. To those who don't know it looks a lot like sand and for all practical puposes it is.
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Old 04-03-2013, 09:39 AM
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ouch....

that's what I was thinking- flood ride... I hope it's not.. being a truck and from that area, i'd guess it could just as easily been ran off road in high water, too..

i came within the width of a woman's nether regions hair from purchasing a 7.3 back in late '05, sight unseen.. When I did get over to look at it, it was in awesome condition from the outside looking in.. when I opened the door, that notion changed.. it stunk to high heavens and had floggin' ants all over the interior.. a carfax on it showed that it had a salvage title and was flood damaged- from the gulf area.. go figure, right?

it had made it up to the coast of nc, via auction houses, and was ultimately sold here.. it was right after Katrina, and maybe the person who bought it realized what it was all about... maybe they didn't..
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Old 04-03-2013, 10:12 AM
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That's exactly what I thought. It is an auction truck and it's suspiciously clean. the interior is immaculate and it smells of leather bound books and rich mahogany. All **** aside I was nervous about a truck from that area. I'll probably have the differential fluid changed and see what that yields, also going to do the tranny fluid and filter Monday...I hope this thing isn't a trashed piece of junk.
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Old 04-04-2013, 05:37 AM
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I bought mine out of Lafayette and when I did the first fuel filter change there was trash and sandy sediment in the housing. I later took the HFCM apart because of slow draining and the compartment was full of the same thing. Idk how often the previous owner drained the seperator but the filters were changed on schedule. Maybe it's just something common in the fuel around here. Truck now has 107000 mi and no troubles yet.
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Old 04-04-2013, 05:43 AM
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Its probably no big deal. Your filters caught it, what you cant see would be the problem such as water. I dont believe your truck was probably flooded. Like stated above, Ford makes a kit that replaces that side piece and gasket for around 40 bucks. Get the kit and remove your side piece on the HFCM and clean it well. It is actually not a bad idea to do this on a brand new truck that may have sat on the lot for a while as an algea substance that looks like oyster likes to form alot of time in diesels
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Old 04-04-2013, 05:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pan4905 View Post
I bought mine out of Lafayette and when I did the first fuel filter change there was trash and sandy sediment in the housing. I later took the HFCM apart because of slow draining and the compartment was full of the same thing. Idk how often the previous owner drained the seperator but the filters were changed on schedule. Maybe it's just something common in the fuel around here. Truck now has 107000 mi and no troubles yet.
My family had a service station in the heart of Baton Rouge for over 40 years and we never had a problem with sand in the fuel tanks
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Old 04-04-2013, 05:51 AM
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^I'm going to agree with woodboy...

there would be more evidence if it was flooded..

I'd reckon that fuel points down there cause y'all grief.. all it takes is a fill cap on a ground tank not being seated, and some hard rain and standing run-off to infiltrate.. toss in a fresh re-fill of those tanks to get everything stirred up- and there you have it..

the north has issues with condensation.. south, run-off.. everyone seems to have their issues..
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Old 04-04-2013, 06:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Cuzmail View Post
My family had a service station in the heart of Baton Rouge for over 40 years and we never had a problem with sand in the fuel tanks
in ground or above ground reservoirs? flush capped or raised?

I reckon if you had a pretty decent volume of fuel through those things, you wouldn't get too much sediment.. also, most stations use a great big canister filter on the pumps themselves.. I shy away from stations that don't..

My dad was VP of a chain of convenience stores when I was growing up.. had around 180 stores iirc... he got a call from over on black mountain one night that there was a problem with fuel... he drove over there, and there were no less than a dozen cars broken down on the road within five miles of the store..

turns out a customer thought it would be funny to run a water hose hanging on the side of the store over to the fill caps, and turn it on.. the tanks were brimmed up with water, and these weren't small tanks.. we're talking 10kgallon at the least.. his insurance company wasn't too happy to find that store had flush caps, and no locks on them..

run-off, carrying silt can do the same thing on a tank with breather flush caps..

thank God we have good filtration systems on these rigs, huh?
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