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Old 11-15-2007, 03:58 PM
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Question Professional Tire Inflation????

I just found this in my manual for my 2008 F250. First off, what the heck is a Steel Carcass Plie tire? Is that the standard tire on an F250, or is that a tire that can be retreaded? Further more, how many of you with this type tire actually follow what the manual reccomends below? What is this all about? Please pardon my ignorance.

Copied directly from the PDF manual:

Tire inflation information
All tires with Steel Carcass Plies (if equipped):
This type of tire utilizes steel cords in the sidewalls. As such, they
cannot be treated like normal light truck tires. Tire service, including
adjusting the air pressure, must be performed by personnel trained,
supervised and equipped according to Federal Occupational Safety and
Health Administration (OSHA) regulations. For example, during any
procedure involving tire inflation, the technician or individual must
utilize a remote inflation device, and ensure that all persons are clear of
the trajectory area.


Always inflate steel carcass tires with a remote air fill with the person
inflating standing at a minimum of 12 ft. (3.7 m) away from the tire
wheel assembly.

Last edited by Barchetta; 11-16-2007 at 07:34 PM.
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Old 11-16-2007, 07:35 PM
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Someone has to have an answer to this question. Anyone?
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Old 11-16-2007, 07:54 PM
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Sounds like Ford's CYA disclaimer.....
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Old 11-16-2007, 08:01 PM
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wow -- now that sounds like fun just to add a little air to your tires! wow...
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Old 11-16-2007, 08:12 PM
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Can you imagine going once a week to the dealership to have them check air in the tires? That doesn't sound right.
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Old 11-16-2007, 08:40 PM
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I was a service manager for Firestone for 5 yrs, andI have never heard of this type tire ever. I called my old store manager who has been in the buisiness for 23 yrs and neither has he. So then I called my buds at Ford and guess what -- they dont have a clue. So over extended research and just plain curiosity I dont know any more than I did this morning when I started asking about it. I just got home a few hous ago and looked on line as well, still nothing. My guess as an ex-pro and after talking with a few others in the field aswell is: they are refering to a tire that has worn through the rubber tread and has steel showing . Since it uses the word carcuss wich means that basically its a dead tire that should require special care if checking and adding air. This may not be the answer but is the only thing that a great group of tire pros can come up with.
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Old 11-16-2007, 09:11 PM
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This was e-mailed to me a few moments ago, It does not really do much, but explains some on these newer tires that will start arriving on some heavy duty use vehicles it looks like-- yeah more changes a comin! So maybe this will help its out of a new Firestone manual that my ex-boss found -- he is as curious as we are I guess.


New low profile radial tires for trucks and buses reinforced with steel cords which comprise two layers of a core and an outer layer, the number of core filaments being 3 to 4 and the number of outer filaments being equal to or less than the number 5 greater than the number of the core filaments, all filaments being substantially equal in diameter and both the core filaments and the outer filaments being twisted in the same direction with a different pitch, and the aspect ratio of the tire being at most 0.85. (85 series)
A steel cord for the reinforcement of rubber article has a three-layer twisting construction comprising a core layer comprised of a single steel filament, a first sheath layer comprised of six steel filaments and a second sheath layer comprised of steel filaments subtracted by 1 or 2 filament from maximum steel filament number arranged on a circumscribed circle of the first sheath layer without a wrap filament. In this steel cord, filament diameters of the core layer and the sheath layers satisfy the particular relationships. The steel cord is used in a steel carcass ply of a heavy duty pneumatic radial tire. Care must be used when handling these type ot tires to insure that the bead is intact and the side wall is not damaged in any way due to the higher pressures and conditions that this type of tire will incure.

I hope this helps , I am still confused but understand more than I did .
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Old 11-17-2007, 05:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richardndawnc View Post
I was a service manager for Firestone for 5 yrs, andI have never heard of this type tire ever. I called my old store manager who has been in the buisiness for 23 yrs and neither has he. So then I called my buds at Ford and guess what -- they dont have a clue. So over extended research and just plain curiosity I dont know any more than I did this morning when I started asking about it. I just got home a few hous ago and looked on line as well, still nothing. My guess as an ex-pro and after talking with a few others in the field aswell is: they are refering to a tire that has worn through the rubber tread and has steel showing . Since it uses the word carcuss wich means that basically its a dead tire that should require special care if checking and adding air. This may not be the answer but is the only thing that a great group of tire pros can come up with.
Wow, thanks for going through all that. I just thought it was a little strange that they don't want you doing anything to your tires. Not even adding air to them. Like another poster said, CYA.

Quote:
Originally Posted by richardndawnc View Post
This was e-mailed to me a few moments ago, It does not really do much, but explains some on these newer tires that will start arriving on some heavy duty use vehicles it looks like-- yeah more changes a comin! So maybe this will help its out of a new Firestone manual that my ex-boss found -- he is as curious as we are I guess.


New low profile radial tires for trucks and buses reinforced with steel cords which comprise two layers of a core and an outer layer, the number of core filaments being 3 to 4 and the number of outer filaments being equal to or less than the number 5 greater than the number of the core filaments, all filaments being substantially equal in diameter and both the core filaments and the outer filaments being twisted in the same direction with a different pitch, and the aspect ratio of the tire being at most 0.85. (85 series)
A steel cord for the reinforcement of rubber article has a three-layer twisting construction comprising a core layer comprised of a single steel filament, a first sheath layer comprised of six steel filaments and a second sheath layer comprised of steel filaments subtracted by 1 or 2 filament from maximum steel filament number arranged on a circumscribed circle of the first sheath layer without a wrap filament. In this steel cord, filament diameters of the core layer and the sheath layers satisfy the particular relationships. The steel cord is used in a steel carcass ply of a heavy duty pneumatic radial tire. Care must be used when handling these type ot tires to insure that the bead is intact and the side wall is not damaged in any way due to the higher pressures and conditions that this type of tire will incure.

I hope this helps , I am still confused but understand more than I did .
I am with you, still a little confussed. However, I now know more than I did when I started.


Thanks again to everyone who responded. It has been a great help.
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