How does regen work? - Ford Powerstroke Diesel Forum
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Old 01-22-2011, 07:44 AM
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How does regen work?

I'm sure it's on here somewhere, but I have not had any success in finding it. How exactly does the regen cycle work on these trucks? I know what it does, but how does it do it? When it's running a cycle, I notice a loss in power and the motor has an unusual "clatter" sound. I plan on doing the delete when I can afford it (just bought the wife a new car), but I'm trying to learn how these powerstrokes operate. Thanks Ya'll.
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Old 01-22-2011, 09:26 AM
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What I hear (I don't know much about it because I knew that it was gonna be the first thing I remove) haha, but it injects fuel to burn off the particulates (hydrocarbons, particulates, soot, ect..) which in turn cleans out the filter in there. I don't know if that's what you are looking for... or any more than you already knew, but that's my 2 cents.

there is a photo online somewhere that explains the basic process. I'll post it up if I can find it.
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Old 01-22-2011, 09:30 AM
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THIS IS WHAT I FOUND ON WIKIPEDIA ( I DIDN'T READ IT, BUT IT MIGHT HELP YA OUT).

Regeneration is the process of removing the accumulated soot from the filter. This is done either passively (from the engine's exhaust heat in normal operation or by adding a catalyst to the filter) or actively introducing very high heat into the exhaust system. On-board active filter management can use a variety of strategies:
Engine management to increase exhaust temperature through late fuel injection or injection during the exhaust stroke
Use of a fuel borne catalyst to reduce soot burn-out temperature
A fuel burner after the turbo to increase the exhaust temperature
A catalytic oxidizer to increase the exhaust temperature, with after injection (HC-Doser)
Resistive heating coils to increase the exhaust temperature
Microwave energy to increase the particulate temperature
All on-board active systems use extra fuel, whether through burning to heat the DPF, or providing extra power to the DPF's electrical system, although the use of a fuel borne catalyst reduces the energy required very significantly. Typically a computer monitors one or more sensors that measure back pressure and/or temperature, and based on pre-programmed set points the computer makes decisions on when to activate the regeneration cycle. The additional fuel can be supplied by a metering pump. Running the cycle too often while keeping the back pressure in the exhaust system low will result in high fuel consumption. Not running the regeneration cycle soon enough increases the risk of engine damage and/or uncontrolled regeneration (thermal runaway) and possible DPF failure.
Diesel particulate matter burns when temperatures above 600 degrees Celsius are attained. This temperature can be reduced to somewhere in the range of 350 to 450 degrees Celsius by use of a fuel borne catalyst. The actual temperature of soot burn-out will depend on the chemistry employed. The start of combustion causes a further increase in temperature. In some cases, in the absence of a fuel borne catalyst, the combustion of the particulate matter can raise temperatures above the structural integrity threshold of the filter material, which can cause catastrophic failure of the substrate. Various strategies have been developed to limit this possibility. Note that unlike a spark-ignited engine, which typically has less than 0.5% oxygen in the exhaust gas stream before the emission control device(s), diesel engines have a very high ratio of oxygen available. While the amount of available oxygen makes fast regeneration of a filter possible, it also contributes to runaway regeneration problems.
Some applications use off-board regeneration. Off-board regeneration requires operator intervention (i.e. the machine is either plugged into a wall/floor mounted regeneration station, or the filter is removed from the machine and placed in the regeneration station). Off-board regeneration is not suitable for on-road vehicles, except in situations where the vehicles are parked in a central depot when not in use. Off-board regeneration is mainly used in industrial and mining applications. Coal mines (with the attendant explosion risk from coal damp) use off-board regeneration if non-disposable filters are installed, with the regeneration stations sited in an area where non-permissible machinery is allowed.
Many forklifts may also use off-board regeneration - typically mining machinery and other machinery that spend their operational lives in one location, which makes having a stationary regeneration station practical. In situations where the filter is physically removed from the machine for regeneration there is also the advantage of being able to inspect the filter core on a daily basis (DPF cores for non-road applications are typically sized to be usable for one shift - so regeneration is a daily occurrence).[4]
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Old 01-22-2011, 09:46 AM
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It injects fuel during the exhaust stroke (easy to do with electronically controlled injectors getting fuel off a comman rail) which ignites in the exhaust system raising the temp to the 1700-2000 degree range to burn off the stuff caught in the DPF. This fuel also cause cylinder wall wash down, redues upper cylinder lubrication and contaminates the engine oil in the process , which is the main reason having the DPF on is bad for the engine. And, of course, the fuel used to heat up the DPF isn't being used to move the truck down the road so it wastes fuel reducing you MPG.
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Old 01-22-2011, 10:43 AM
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Biodiesel Magazine | biodieselmagazine.com

This is a good read.
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Old 01-22-2011, 11:03 AM
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So I hear this regen, egr, and dpf is what is causing most of the problems on the 6.4? I am looking at buying a 6.4 soon and will be putting spartan on it and a full straight pipe exhaust. With the spartan and no dpf, does this shut down the regen and egr completely where I don't have to worry about the problems caused by them?
Thanks
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Old 01-22-2011, 02:16 PM
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By removing the DPF you must have a tuner, and yes it will stop the whole regen BS.
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