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Old 10-15-2008, 07:30 PM
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Cold Start

What is the worst that could happen if you start a 6.0 powerstroke without letting the glow plugs warm up first on a cold day? Could it crack the engine block?
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Old 10-15-2008, 07:34 PM
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I dunno for sure, but I wouldn't wanna find it out! It would be very very rough, that's for sure! I usually cycle my glow plugs at least twice before I start it in the winter, on top of plugging it in about 4 hours before I start it.
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Old 10-15-2008, 07:34 PM
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it would take longer to start if it did...

pretty sure they just preheat the air so its easier for it to combust.
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Old 10-15-2008, 07:49 PM
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i dont believe anything happens if you cycle more then once..could be wrong but i remember someone saying this to me..I always cycle even in the summer..only on first start up and then i just crank it up when its warm.

you would def get a real rough idle at first..but really whats the point not to cycle..unless a killer is chasing you and you just jump into the truck then start that pig up and take off!
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Old 10-16-2008, 04:39 AM
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I drive a little Kia for commuting to work and with that car I just jump in and crank. There has been at least one time that I recall that I totally forgot I was in my PSD and I jumped in the truck ready to leave a store parking lot, wasn't thinking, put the key in and tried to crank it over. OOPPPSS! Nothing happened but it hit me like a brick on what I had just done so I started over again and waited for the glow plug light to go out the second time...lol Got to remind myself what vehicle I am in all the time so I know how to crank it over.
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Old 10-16-2008, 05:19 AM
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the worst that could happen is it wont start besides that it wont hurt anything but remember 60 to 80% of diesel wear comes from cold starts they just dont like not having heat.
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Old 10-16-2008, 08:01 AM
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Another source of wear is rapid thermal cycling, i.e. heating the engine up quickly. As the engine heats up, the internal parts expand just a bit. 'Cause they're not made out of exactly the same material, they tend to expand at slightly different rates. The faster you heat the engine (i.e. putting the engine under load when it's cold), the more the different expansion rate of the parts matters. Moving parts can rub against each other differently during this period of expansion - I believe valve guides are particularly sensitive to this. It's a miniscule amount of wear, but spread out over hundreds of warmups, it adds up. I've known two people that have put ungodly amounts of miles on vehicles. Both said that a slow warmup during winter was something they always did.

Good reason to use a block heater - it warms the parts slowly, and does so when they're not moving. It doesn't put the engine at operating temperature, but it gets it past the worst time, when the block is down in sub zero temperatures.
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Old 10-16-2008, 06:27 PM
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cold start

Thanks for the info guys, I was just woundering.
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