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Old 10-12-2012, 05:28 AM
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Bulletproof Diesel Oil Cooler INSTALL



1. Never clog another oil cooler
2. Separates oil and coolant paths to eliminate the possibility of ever contaminating your coolant with oil
3. Reduces overall coolant temps because the oil isn’t transferring heat to the coolant through the oil cooler
4. No coolant filter that MUST be maintained in order to have proper coolant flow
5. Only two additional hoses in the engine bay rather than several large new parts
6. OEM oil filter replaced with a canister style filter
7. Five additional quarts of oil capacity
8. Unsurpassed customer service
9. It fixes the problem instead of simply making it easier to replace another OEM oil cooler










Introduction / Background

Bulletproof Diesel. The name pretty much says it all. Lately, the term has become synonymous with any Ford 6.0L Power Stroke that has an oil cooler that’s been replaced, an EGR delete, and head studs. My 2005 F-250 was on its second oil cooler and I began seeing a significant difference between the Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) and Engine Oil Temperature (EOT). This difference is commonly referred to as the delta (delta is a mathematical term meaning difference) and a delta of 15°F or more is a good indicator of a clogged oil cooler (according to Ford). If the oil cooler remains intact, the high EOT/ECT difference is a strong indicator that not enough coolant (not oil, but coolant) is flowing through the oil cooler to remove the heat from the oil. This is why you have such a large difference between the two temperatures. Since the coolant flows from the water pump through the oil cooler and then through the EGR cooler, this low coolant flow through the oil cooler means that you also have low coolant flow through the EGR cooler! This is the primary cause of EGR cooler failure: a plugged up/restricted stock oil cooler. This can lead to another common 6.0L problem: a ruptured/failed EGR cooler. A ruptured or leaking EGR cooler is a major cause of blown head gaskets. If not fixed in a timely manner, it’s possible to hydro lock the motor and bend rods or stretch the head bolts. Or, if you’re “lucky,” the oil cooler will rupture and contaminate your coolant with engine oil. Chemical coolant flushes and coolant filters have become popular with 6.0L owners, and while they may decrease the chances of clogging an OEM oil cooler, there are countless stories on the internet of people who have flushed their coolant, installed a new OEM oil cooler, and then clogged the new oil cooler within a short period of time.

I didn’t want to accept the fact that my oil cooler was clogged again, but when my gauges showed a 206°F ECT and a 244°F EOT (a 38°F delta!), I knew it was well beyond time to take action. I also knew that I wanted to fix this issue once and for all. Engine coolant in the OEM oil coolers travels through tiny passageways in order to regulate the oil temperature, but these passageways are easily obstructed with casting sand left in the engine block, sediment from the radiator or other metal parts in the cooling system, and/or silicates in the coolant that have fallen out of suspension. Bulletproof Diesel developed an air-to-liquid oil cooler that appears to be impossible to clog, and their design also mitigates the coolant contamination risk: their oil cooler completely separates the paths of the engine oil and engine coolant. An additional benefit that I didn’t immediately realize involves the use of a canister style oil filter instead of the OEM cartridge filter. If you’ve ever examined the bottom of an OEM oil filter, you may have noticed a ring made of felt in the center. The felt fibers have a tendency to separate from the bottom of the oil filter and travel to the High Pressure Oil Pump (HPOP) screen, where they gather and begin starving the HPOP of oil. Even worse, the fibers can contribute to a HPOP screen failure and cause a catastrophic failure of the HPOP.

To me, the choice was obvious: buy a Bulletproof Diesel oil cooler and never again have to worry about a clogged oil cooler or cross contamination of oil and coolant.


The purchase: “Treat every customer as though they are your only customer”

I had several conversations with the team at Bulletproof Diesel before making my purchase and while completing my install, and I was overwhelmed by how well I was treated. They had several opportunities to make extra money off of me, but instead guided me to only the parts I needed. Every person I spoke to was friendly, professional, honest, courteous, and knowledgeable. My emails and voicemails were returned the same day, usually within an hour or two, and this level of service continued after the sale. At one point, I needed another part (my own fault) and contacted them for assistance. Not only was the part shipped that day, but I received a call before it was shipped to ask me how quickly I needed it! I think they must have posted numerous signs in their building that say “Treat every customer as if they are your only customer.”

My order arrived just a few days later, and it was packed so well that I actually called my wife to the garage to take a look. It was obvious that every effort was made to ensure all the necessary parts were included and that they would arrive at my house without so much as a scratch. Speaking of the parts, it was also immediately apparent that they were chosen for quality, strength, and durability rather than what may have the highest profit margin. You’re not going to find anything that looks or feels cheap in this kit.



Installation

I feel compelled to start by stating the instruction manual sent with the kit is very thorough and well written. For liability reasons, Bulletproof Diesel does not include the specific procedures or torque specifications for removing and replacing the OEM oil cooler with their Oil Transfer Block. However, they do provide an external link on their website that will direct you to this information. I’m providing much of this “missing” information, and I also feel it’s limit my potential liability.

DISCLAIMER
The procedures and torque values I’ve provided are accurate to the best of my knowledge. However, I am not a trained technician and the procedures and torque values within this write up are based on my research and not formal instruction that I have received. Neither this website, Bulletproof Diesel, nor myself are directly or indirectly responsible for any inaccuracies contained within this documentation that result in damage to, or failure of, a part or component, or any repair costs incurred as a result of a part or component that has failed or been damaged as a result of the information I’ve provided.

** NOTE ** -- this installation was completed on a 2005 F-250 built on 03/17/05. At the time of the installation, head gaskets were also repaired and the pictures may show other parts that have been removed but are not discussed. Additionally, the steps I’ve provided may not be 100% applicable for your 6.0L Power Stroke as there are slight build differences from Ford between different model years. These variances are covered in the Bulletproof Diesel installation manual as well as the model year specific kit purchased. Furthermore, my documentation should not be viewed as the only way of performing the installation of the Bulletproof Diesel oil cooler. I listed the steps I performed in the order in which they were executed, but some may prefer to follow the provided steps in a different sequence. I attempted to present these steps in a manner that offered the path of least resistance. For example, it’s possible to remove a FICM without removing the degas bottle, but it’s easier with the degas bottle out of the way. Therefore, my documentation covers the removal of the degas bottle first and then provides steps for removing the FICM.


Recommended Tools
  • Ratchets – 1/2, 3/8, and 1/4 drives
  • Sockets (deep and regular)
  • 1/4, 5/16, 7/16, 1 1/16”
  • 5.5, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13, 15, 18, 19, 36mm
  • Wobble sockets are helpful but not necessary
  • Socket extensions (2, 4, and 6”) for all ratchets
  • Wrenches (crescent / open end)
  • 5/16, 11/16, 13/16, 1 1/4”
  • 13, 19mm
  • Hex head socket or Allen Key
  • 1/4, 9/16”
  • 8mm
  • T-45 Torx bit
  • T-17 Torx bit
  • Flat-head screwdriver
  • Pliers (regular and needle nose)
  • Torque wrench (ft/lbs)
  • Torque wrench (in/lbs)
  • Hammer
  • Pry bar
  • Buckets (to collect coolant and oil)
  • Lint free towels
  • Teflon tape or anaerobic thread sealer (rated for oil and high temperatures)
  • Mineral oil (for o-rings on A/C lines)
  • Electrical connector cleaner
  • Dielectric grease
  • Copper washers or Viton sealing washers for banjo bolt (fuel filter housing)
  • Fluid transfer pump
  • Motor oil – 20 qts (5 gallons)
  • Engine coolant – 4 gallons (50/50 mix) or 2 gallons concentrate and 2 gallons of distilled water


General tips
  • Do not discard any parts that are removed, including nuts, bolts, and o-rings
  • Sort and label all connectors (nuts, bolts, electrical connectors) in bags or bins to help make the reinstallation less confusing
  • Take pictures before and after removing parts during disassembly for the same reason
  • While everything is apart, visually inspect all wiring and connectors for chafing or other potential weak points and repair as needed
  • Clean all electrical connectors and add a small amount of dielectric grease to each during the installation
  • This installation is possible with only hand tools, but air tools make the job much easier
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Last edited by Snake; 12-16-2012 at 12:47 PM.
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  #2  
Old 10-12-2012, 05:28 AM
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1. Evacuate air conditioner / recover air conditioning refrigerant. If you don’t have the proper equipment to complete this step and maintain compliance with EPA regulations, locate a shop in your area and have them do this for you (should cost around $40). **TIP** Disconnect a line immediately after the refrigerant is recovered. If you have to drive anywhere after this step, the air conditioning system will build pressure again. Hopefully it goes without saying that you’ll want to re-connect this line before you drive.

2. Disconnect / remove batteries. On the passenger side battery, loosen the negative battery connector and then the positive battery connector using an 8mm socket. Next, remove the long bolt with the wedge at the bottom that secures the battery to the battery tray using a 7mm socket. Repeat on the driver side battery if desired. I removed only the passenger side and used the battery tray as a staging area for tools, nuts/bolts/washers container, etc. If you don’t remove the driver side battery, disconnect the battery and cover the posts with a rag or towel. I chose to keep mine installed because it was one less part to remove and store.






3. Drain coolant. Place a bucket under the plastic pet**** located at the back and bottom of the radiator on the driver side and unscrew the pet**** until coolant is draining from the radiator. Do not completely remove it. Once coolant has stopped flowing from this location, move your bucket under the large radiator hose, disconnect the hose clamp using a 7mm socket, and drain the remaining coolant.

4. Drain engine oil. Loosen the oil filter cap on top of the oil filter housing using a 36mm socket. You can either remove the cap and the oil filter entirely, or loosen the cap to an extent that allows the oil filter to pop up. The goal is to allow the oil to drain from the oil filter housing.

5. Remove grill. Unscrew the four 5.5mm bolts at the top of the grill. Gently pull the top of the grill shell away from the vehicle and use a pry bar (or long, flat head screw driver) to push down on the tabs holding the lower part of the grill shell in place. I placed a towel between the bottom of the grill and the top of the bumper to keep both from getting scratched.

6. Remove bumper. You can do this now or wait until later in the process, and I chose to leave it on. It’s one less part that you need to potentially store. It will need to be removed at some point in order to connect the oil lines to the oil filter mount. Loosen / remove the two 18mm bolts next to each tow hook and the 13mm bolts used to secure the bumper support brackets inside the front wheel well.

7. Remove air cleaner (air filter) assembly. Due to the popularity of aftermarket Cold Air Intakes (CAI’s), I did not include the steps for removing the stock air intake and filter. I have an Airaid cold air intake and you may have additional steps if you have a stock air intake or one from a different manufacturer.
a. Disconnect the Mass Airflow sensor electrical connector
b. Disconnect the filter minder assembly
c. Loosen the clamp closest to the turbo using an 8mm socket
d. Pull the entire air filter assembly up and out of the engine bay






8. Remove the intercooler pipes. One pipe is connected to the compressor outlet of the turbo and the other is connected to the intake manifold at the intake elbow (90° elbow at the front of the intake manifold on top). Using an 11mm deep well socket, loosen the four clamps holding the two intercooler pipes in place and wiggle the pipes free.






9. Remove the degas bottle. Disconnect the three hoses attached to the degas bottle: the engine vent hose (EGR cooler to degas bottle), radiator overflow hose, and degas bottle supply hose (underside of degas bottle). Remove the two 8mm bolts located near the wiper cowl that hold the degas bottle in place. Disconnect the radiator overflow hose from the radiator.






10. Remove the turbo intake tube. This is the plastic tube attached to the compressor inlet of the turbo and connects the turbo’s compressor housing to the air filter assembly. Use an 8mm deep socket to loosen the clamp at the turbo, a 10mm socket to remove the 2 nuts that hold the turbo intake elbow and the FICM bracket together, and remove the turbo intake elbow.


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Old 10-12-2012, 05:29 AM
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11. Remove the Fuel Injection Control Module (FICM). Remove the two 8mm bots at the back of the FICM (closest to the firewall) that hold the FICM to the driver side valve cover and then carefully unplug the three FICM connectors (X1, X2, and X3). **TIP** -- the connectors have locks on both sides that must be pushed in to remove them from the FICM.






12. Disconnect the fuel lines from the oil filter / fuel filter housing. Two of the fuel lines will need an 11/16 open end wrench, one line will require a 13/16 open end wrench (return line to tank), and the banjo bolt at the housing will require a 19mm open end wrench. Remove the 10mm bolt in the bracket that holds the passenger side fuel line to the front of the intake manifold. Secure the other fuel lines to the side out of the way. **NOTE** The fuel lines do not have to be disconnected from the cylinder heads to install the Bulletproof Diesel oil cooler. If they are disconnected, the washers on the banjo bolts will have to be replaced. These lines are removed from my truck because we also replaced head gaskets while completing this install.






13. Remove the oil filter / fuel filter housing and stand pipe. Remove the four T-45 Torx bolts that secure the housing to the oil cooler and remove the housing. Save the large o-ring between this housing and the oil cooler. The stand pipe (the plastic cylinder that the center of the oil filter slides onto) is held in place with a single T-27 Torx bolt. Remove that bolt and then the stand pipe.










14. Remove the upper radiator hose. Squeeze the spring clip holding the hose to the front cover at the thermostat and slide it up the hose. Do the same with the spring clamp holding the hose to the radiator and pull the hose free.






15. Remove the belt (aka the accessory drive belt). It IS possible to remove the belt without removing the fan shroud, but it’s also a little more challenging. Use a long handle 1/2” drive ratchet to reach the square hole on the front of the tensioner pulley. Set the ratchet to loosen bolts, insert the ratchet drive (square part of the ratchet that holds the socket) into the hole, rotate the ratchet handle towards the driver side of the truck, and then pull the ratchet towards the passenger side. This will relieve the tension on the accessory drive belt and allow the belt to be slipped off of the alternator pulley. If you continue to pull on the ratchet and move the pulley further, there is a catch on the tensioner pulley that will hold the pulley in place and keep tension off the belt. Experienced technicians are even able to pull on the belt by hand and engage the catch! Regardless of the technique employed, the two 15mm bolts that secure the fan shroud to the front of the intake manifold will also have to be removed to allow the intake manifold to be pulled out.






16. Remove the alternator. Disconnect the two-pin plug on the back of the alternator, remove the 10mm nut holding the ring terminal on the top of the alternator (for the red power wire that runs from the alternator to the passenger side battery), and remove the three 13mm bolts securing the alternator to the intake manifold.






17. Remove the heater hose tube (passenger side). Remove the 8mm bolt that secures the heater tube to the side of the intake manifold. Option 1: bend this bracket slightly to allow the intake manifold to be removed without disconnecting the heater hose tube from the front cover. Option 2: In addition to removing the 8mm bolt on the side of the intake manifold, also remove the 8mm bolt that secures the heater hose tube to the front cover. **NOTE** There is an o-ring at this connection point and the o-ring often must be replaced before reinstallation. However, an o-ring is NOT included in the Bulletproof Diesel kit.






18. Disconnect the Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor hose by sliding the spring clamp up the hose and pulling the hose free of the intake manifold.






19. Remove the turbo and turbo pedestal. Use an 11mm deep socket to loosen the clamps holding the down pipe and Y pipe to the rear of the turbo. **NOTE** The down pipe is the larger diameter pipe on the rear of the turbo that is connected to the turbine outlet. The Y pipe is the smaller diameter pipe on the rear of the turbo connected to the turbine inlet. Next, remove the two 10mm bolts holding the oil feed tube on top of the turbo and the 8mm bolt that holds the feed tube to the oil cooler. Remove the oil feed tube. You’ll replace the gasket on top of the turbo and the o-ring at the bottom of the tube with new ones provided by Bulletproof Diesel. Then remove the three 10mm bolts that hold the turbo to the turbo pedestal (two on the front of the turbo and one on the back side). Disconnect the variable vane hydraulic control valve electrical connector (aka, the VGT electrical connector). Use a pry bar to separate the turbo from the turbo pedestal. **NOTE** At this point in time, the goal is to break the turbo free of the pedestal, the oil drain tube, and the exhaust pipes. Once loose, use your hands to pull the turbo from the pedestal. You’ll see the oil drain tube sticking up from underneath where the turbo was sitting – this just pulls out. The drain tube o-rings can be thrown out (new o-rings are included in the Bulletproof Diesel kit). Finally, remove the four 10mm bolts that secure the turbo pedestal to the block and remove the pedestal.











20. Disconnect the following electrical connectors:
a. Injector Pressure Regulator (IPR) sensor – located at the rear of the engine on top of the HPOP cover directly next to the ICP sensor
b. Injector Control Pressure (ICP) sensor – located at the rear of the engine on top of the HPOP cover directly next to the IPR sensor
c. Engine Oil Temperature (EOT) sensor – located on top of the oil cooler next to the base of the oil filter housing
d. Engine Oil Pressure (EOP) sensor – located on top of the oil cooler next to the based of the oil filter housing
e. Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) valve sensor – plugs into the EGR valve located at the front of the intake manifold on top
f. Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) sensor – located on the driver side of the front cover next to where the upper radiator hose connects
g. Intake Air Temperature (IAT2) sensor – located on top of the intake manifold on the driver side
h. Exhaust Backpressure (EBP) sensor – located on the driver side valve cover approximately half way between the front and back, below the degas bottle near the master cylinder (connector sits on top of a metal tube)
i. Glow Plug Module (GPM) connectors – located at the front of the passenger side valve cover, these are the two connectors that plug into the Glow Plug Control Module
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Last edited by Snake; 10-12-2012 at 05:37 AM.
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  #4  
Old 10-12-2012, 05:29 AM
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21. Disconnect the FICM / fuel injector harness. Simultaneously squeeze and pull upward on the retaining clips that hold the FICM / fuel injector harness in place. **NOTE** There is a 10mm nut on the driver side rear stud (bolt) of the intake manifold that serves as a ground for the FICM harness. Ensure you remove this nut and the ground wire before attempting to move the harness out of your working area (the engine bay). The harness does not have to be removed completely: you can simply lay the harness towards the front of the engine to allow you to remove the intake manifold. You also DO NOT need to remove the fuel injector connectors from the rocker boxes.


22. Remove the intake manifold and EGR cooler. Use a 10mm deep socket to remove the two bolts towards front of the intake that secure the EGR cooler. Disconnect the engine coolant vent hose (the hose that runs from the intake manifold to the degas bottle) by loosening the spring clamp that holds it to the intake manifold. Loosen the clamp at the rear of the at holds the EGR cooler to the exhaust up pipe and then use a knife or hose cutter to cut the hose (blue or orange) that connects the EGR cooler and the oil cooler. **NOTE** The EGR cooler on my vehicle has been deleted and is not pictured in this documentation.**TIP** Prior to removing the intake manifold, document which of the sixteen 10mm bolts are studs to ensure they are replaced in the holes from which they were removed. Take pictures, mark the intake with a China marker, or whatever is easiest. Once completed, remove the 10mm bolts/studs and pull the intake manifold free of the engine. It’s usually possible to re-use the intake manifold gaskets, but you can discard the ones currently on the truck since two new intake manifold gaskets are included in the Bulletproof Diesel kit. The preceding steps cover the removal of a stock intake manifold, and my removal procedure differs from what is documented here since the intake manifold on my truck is an aftermarket unit.


23. Remove the oil cooler. **TIP #1** Prior to removing the oil cooler, clean the valley (top of the engine that the oil cooler bolts to) in order to prevent debris from falling into the High Pressure Oil Pump (HPOP) reservoir. **TIP #2** Place shop rags / lint free cloths behind the oil cooler in the valley to capture the oil that will spill from the HPOP reservoir when the oil cooler is removed. Remove the ten 10mm bolts that hold the oil cooler onto the engine block and carefully pull upwards on the oil cooler.






24. Clean the HPOP reservoir and remove the HPOP screen. There are a number of different ways of removing the engine oil from the HPOP reservoir, but something that can suck the oil out is the most efficient. We used a device that converts compressed air into suction and fills a clear container to draw the oil out of the HPOP reservoir, but you could also use a small hand pump. **NOTE** When you get to the point of using a rag to get the last bit of oil out, ensure that you use a lint free towel in the reservoir! We also cleaned the reservoir with brake clean and then dried it out using compressed air. Depending on how bad your oil is in the reservoir, you may want to keep your HPOP screen in place as long as possible during this process to catch debris. Ultimately, the HPOP screen needs to come out and can be discarded. The integral stainless steel screen on the underside of the Bulletproof Oil Transfer Block replaces the OEM HPOP screen entirely.












25. Install the Bulletproof Diesel Oil Transfer Block. Install the supplied OEM oil cooler gasket into the bottom of the Oil Transfer Block and ensure it’s fully seated. Secure the Oil Transfer Block to the engine with the ten 10mm bolts and torque to 16 ft/lbs. **TIP** Leave the plastic caps on the Oil Transfer Block to prevent debris from entering the HPOP reservoir (the plastic caps that cover where the hoses connect).








26. Transfer the oil pressure sensor and oil temperature sender. Use a 1 1/16” deep socket to remove the oil pressure sender from the OEM oil cooler and a 7/8” deep socket to remove the oil temperature sensor. Gently clean both pieces with electrical connector cleaner, and install them onto the Bulletproof Diesel Oil Transfer Block (each location is marked on the Oil Transfer Block). **NOTE** I chose to perform this step after the Oil Transfer Block was secured to the engine so I wouldn’t have to hold the Oil Transfer Block while simultaneously tightening these two components.




27. As mentioned previously, my truck has an aftermarket intake manifold / EGR delete and engine coolant is routed directly back to the degas bottle from the oil cooler. I replaced the fitting on the Oil Transfer Block that would normally connect to the silicone hose for the EGR cooler with a 1/2” NPT male x -6AN male fitting to accommodate the -6AN fitting on this hose.









28. Install the intake manifold. Install the new intake manifold gaskets and ensure the locating tabs on the gaskets are up and towards the center of the engine. Next, carefully place the intake manifold on top of the gaskets and verify that the gaskets did not shift. Loosely place the intake manifold bolts and studs in the correct holes (remember the removal step where you were told to keep track of their locations?) and tighten to 8 ft/lbs following the sequence below. Finally, connect the passenger side fuel line to the front of the intake manifold using the bracket on the line and a 10mm bolt. Torque the 10mm bracket bolt to 10 ft/lbs.






29. For trucks with an EGR cooler: Remove the remnants of the OEM EGR cooler hose from the EGR cooler. Slide the V-clamp over the scoop of the turbo up pipe, hold the new gasket in place on the rear of the EGR cooler, align the rear of the EGR cooler with the turbo up pipe, and torque the V-clamp to 53 in/lbs (not ft/lbs!). **TIP** A light coat of all purpose grease applied to the mating surface of the EGR cooler will help hold the gasket in place. Slide the blue silicone hose included in the Bulletproof Diesel kit over front of the EGR cooler and then slide the two spring clamps included in the Bulletproof Diesel kit over the silicone hose. Connect the open end of the blue silicone hose to the Oil Transfer Block and use the spring clamps to secure the hose to the EGR cooler and the Oil Transfer Block. Why spring clamps? They tighten as the outside diameter of the hose decreases. Finally, connect the engine vent hose (the hose connecting the intake manifold to the degas bottle) back to the intake manifold.

30. Connect the FICM / fuel injector harness. **TIP** Routing the FICM / fuel injector harness is easier to do with the turbo removed. I recommend doing this before installing the turbo, but it can still be done if the turbo is already installed. Lay the harness back in place (where the wire bundle was originally routed) and secure the harness using the retaining clips. Use the 10mm nut to attach the ground at the rear of the intake manifold on the driver side and torque to 8 ft/lbs. Connect the eight fuel injector electrical connectors (four on the passenger side and four on the driver side).
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  #5  
Old 10-12-2012, 05:31 AM
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31. Connect the following electrical connectors:
a. Injector Pressure Regulator (IPR) sensor
b. Injector Control Pressure (ICP) sensor
c. Engine Oil Temperature (EOT) sensor
d. Engine Oil Pressure (EOP) sensor
e. Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) valve sensor
f. EGR throttle position sensor
g. Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) sensor
h. Intake Air Temperature (IAT2) sensor
i. Exhaust Backpressure (EBP) sensor
j. Glow Plug Module (GPM) connector
32. Install the FICM. Plug in the three FICM connectors (X1, X2, and X3) and position the FICM on top of the driver side valve cover. Secure the rear of the FICM to the valve cover with two 8mm bolts and torque them to 10 ft/lbs. Also see picture for Step 11.

33. Connect the heater hose tube (passenger side). If you removed the heater hose tube from the front cover, replace the o-ring for that mounting plate (where the end of the heater hose tube meets the front cover) and secure the heater hose tube to the front cover using the plate and corresponding 8mm bolt. Connect the heater tube to the side of the intake manifold with the OEM bracket and 8mm bolt. If you chose to bend the bracket (Option 1 from Step 17), gently bend the bracket back into position and torque both 8mm bolts to 10 ft/lbs.

34. Connect the Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor hose. Slide the MAP sensor hose over the fitting on top of the passenger side of the intake manifold and slide the spring clamp over the hose and fitting.



Now for the fun stuff.

**NOTE** My truck has the 14” transmission cooler and the power steering cooler is located near the bottom of the radiator. If your truck has a 17” transmission cooler and/or a power steering cooler that is located near the hood latch, additional steps are necessary and covered in the Bulletproof Diesel Installation manual.

35. Remove the Air Conditioning Condenser. Remove the nine retaining pins that hold the sight shield (cover) in place, and gently pull the sight shield up and off the front of the truck. Use a 13mm open end wrench to disconnect the A/C condenser core inlet and outlet lines located on the passenger side of the A/C condenser (each line is held in place with a 13mm nut). Mark the location of the hood latch (we could see where the mechanism would need to be positioned when installed and skipped this step). Remove the two 8mm screws holding the hood latch in place and position the hood latch out of the way. Remove the 8mm screw that holds the “L” shaped AC condenser bracket to the core support and repeat on the other bracket. Lift the A/C condenser out through the space normally covered by the sight shield.









36. Mount the Bulletproof Diesel heat exchanger (also referred to as the air cooler and/or oil cooler) to the Bulletproof Diesel condenser mounting bracket. **NOTE** Ensure the heat exchanger is positioned on the mounting bracket correctly. The oil inlet and oil outlet ports are positioned at different heights on the heat exchanger to prevent air from being trapped in the system. Place the mounting bracket onto a working surface with the flat side down (the large “lip” should be at the top). This is how the bracket would be viewed if you were sitting directly behind it after it’s mounted to the AC condenser (the flat side mounts to the back of the AC condenser). With the “Bulletproof Diesel” logo facing the back (the side facing up, in this case) of the condenser mounting bracket, align the two holes on the top of the heat exchanger with the two studs at the top of the mounting bracket and do the same with the two holes and studs at the bottom of the components. Slide a 1/4” washer over each stud and then secure the heat exchanger to the mounting bracket with a 1/4” nut on each stud. Tighten the 1/4” nuts securely.












37. Install JIC fittings into heat exchanger. **NOTE** The JIC fittings do not require Teflon tape or thread sealer. With the condenser mount and heat exchanger still face down, thread a #12 JIC 90° elbow fitting into the port on the left side of the heat exchanger. This is the “oil in” side of the heat exchanger and the port is centered from top to bottom on the side of the heat exchanger. Ensure the opening of the JIC fitting is pointing directly towards the bottom of the heat exchanger and tighten the fitting into the port using a 1 1/4” open end wrench. Thread a #12 JIC straight fitting into the port closest to the top of the right side of the heat exchanger. This is the “oil out” port. **NOTE** There are two threaded ports on the right side of the heat exchanger, and they’re dummy proof: the hole closest in the center of the side of the heat exchanger is smaller and won’t accommodate a #12 JIC fitting. Use a 1 1/4” open end wrench to tighten the straight fitting into the port. The center port on the right side can be used to tie in a supply line for a by-pass oil filtration system or a sender for an engine oil temperature or engine oil pressure gauge. This may be the one time I didn’t add something “extra” to a part being installed on my truck and I used the 1/4” pipe-plug brass insert included in the Bulletproof Diesel kit to block off this port. To install this pipe-plug, wrap the threads of the pipe-plug with Teflon tape and thread the pipe-plug into the port. **TIP** Hold the pipe plug with the bottom (the end going into the port) facing you and wrap the Teflon tape in a clockwise direction. Tighten the plug in the port using a 1/4” hex head socket (or hex key wrench). DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN.

38. Mount the Bulletproof Diesel heat exchanger and condenser mounting bracket to the A/C condenser. For simplicity, I’ll collectively refer to the heat exchanger and condenser mounting bracket as the mounting bracket. Place the front of the A/C condenser on a working surface in the same manner as the previous step: the front of the condenser should be flat on the working surface, the back of the condenser should be facing up, and the top of the condenser should be facing away from you. Lay the front of the mounting bracket (the side with the Bulletproof Diesel logo on the heat exchanger) on the back of the A/C condenser while aligning the tops of the mounting bracket and the A/C condenser. In other words, the top of the mounting bracket should sit level (flush) with the top of the A/C condenser. Determine which four holes on the left and right sides of the mounting bracket line up most closely with holes on the A/C condenser and insert one aluminum spacer (included in the Bulletproof kit) in between the mounting bracket and the A/C condenser for each hole you identified. Use one self tapping screw (included) for each hole and secure the condenser mount to the back of the A/C condenser using a flat-head screwdriver to tighten the screws. **TIP** It may be easier to insert one spacer, loosely screw in one of the self tapping screws, and repeat for the remaining three. This will help keep the spacers in place.







39. Mount oil hoses to the heat exchanger. Locate the black, 16” long oil hose with a straight fitting on either end. This hose will connect the heat exchanger to the Bulletproof Diesel oil filter adapter (oil filter mount). Screw one of the oil hose’s straight fittings onto the JIC 90° elbow fitting located on the left side of the heat exchanger (the “oil in” port). Tighten securely using a 1 1/4” open end wrench. Next, locate the black, 56” long oil hose with a straight fitting on either end (the other 56” long oil hose has a straight fitting on one end and a 90° elbow fitting on the other). This hose returns oil from the heat exchanger to the Oil Transfer Block. Screw one of the oil hose’s straight fittings to the JIC straight fitting on the right side of the heat exchanger (the “oil out” port). Tighten securely using a 1 1/4” open end wrench.

40. Install the A/C condenser with the heat exchanger attached. **TIP 1** A second set of hands is almost a necessity for this step. I found it was easiest to have a person on the left side and a person on the right side of the condenser. **TIP 2** Use duct tape to cover the open ends of the unsecured fittings (the fittings not connected to the heat exchanger). This will prevent debris from entering the hoses. Start by positioning the A/C condenser close to where the sight cover / hood latch is located and route the unsecured ends of the two oil hoses into the space where the A/C condenser will eventually go. While lowering the A/C condenser into its mounting location, route the unsecured end of 56” oil hose (passenger side) through the hole in the core support where the A/C lines pass through. In the engine bay, this hose will route under the passenger side battery tray and along the inside of the fender well before turning up and over the Glow Plug Module (GPM) on its way to the Oil Transfer Block. **TIP 3*** Ensure the oil hose and the A/C hoses do not rub or the A/C hoses can eventually fail. **TIP 4** Do not connect this hose to the Oil Transfer Block yet. There are other parts that need to be installed and the passenger side oil hose will be used to prime the heat exchanger. Route the unsecured end of the 16” oil hose towards the front driver side tire. Ensure this hose is behind the tow hook bucket / bumper mount bracket. Verify the A/C condenser is fully seated in it’s mounting location, secure the “L” shaped A/C condenser mounting brackets to the core support using the 8mm screws, and torque to 89 in/lbs. Next, mount the hood latch back in it’s original location on the core support with the 8mm screws. Torque the screws to 9 ft/lbs. Finally, connect the A/C condenser inlet and outlet lines to the fittings on the passenger side of the A/C condenser. Lubricate two new o-rings in mineral oil, place one on each fitting of the A/C condenser, and connect each line using a 13mm nut. Torque to 71 in/lbs. **TIP 5** Do not install the sight shield at this time. After all components have been installed and fluids have been replaced, start the truck and visually inspect for leaks. It will be easier to look for and fix any leaks that are found if some of the larger vehicle parts have not been installed yet.





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41. Assemble the oil filter adapter. Look down at the top of the oil filter adapter so the writing is legible. On the left side of the adapter are two ports: “oil in” and “oil out”. Thread a #12 JIC 90° elbow fitting into the oil in port finger-tight. This fitting will be fully tightened once the oil filter adapter is mounted to the truck (see Step 43). On the right side of the adapter are two more ports, also labeled “oil in” and “oil out.” Thread a #12 JIC straight fitting into the “oil out” port and tighten the fitting in the port using a 1 1/4” open end wrench. Plug each of the remaining open ports of the oil filter adapter with a #12 o-ring hex plug and tighten them using a 9/16” hex head socket (or hex key wrench).











42. Mount the oil filter adapter to the oil filter mounting bracket. Insert the 5/16” x 1 1/4” bolt (the longer of the three 5/16” bolts provided) with a 5/16” flat washer through the oil filter mounting bracket and the hole at high point (top of the triangle) on the oil filter adapter. Use a 5/16” flat washer and nut on the oil filter adapter side to secure the bolt. The two shorter 5/16” bolts (3/4” long) also get a 5/16” flat washer and thread directly into the oil filter adapter through the oil filter mounting bracket. **TIP** Do not install the oil filter at this time. It’s easier to bolt the oil filter mounting bracket to the truck with the oil filter out of the way.









43. Mount the oil filter adapter to the vehicle. If you haven’t already removed the bumper, now is the time to do so (instructions were provided in Step #6). If you’ve used the correct oil hoses for the other steps, the only hose left in the kit is 56” long and has a straight fitting on one end and a 90° elbow fitting on the other end. As before, cover the open end of the straight fitting with duct tape to prevent debris from entering the line. Standing in front of the vehicle, locate the small gap between the frame and the core support just behind the tow hook bucket. Thread the straight fitting end of the hose through this opening and continue to feed the hose through. **TIP 1** To determine approximately how much hose is needed to reach the oil filter adapter (which will be located behind the front bumper on the driver side), continue to feed the hose into the engine bay until the 90° elbow fitting at the other end of the hose barely touches the inner sidewall of the driver side front tire when the hose is pulled straight. A visual inspection of the area where the oil filter adapter will mount should show the ends two oil hoses, one with a straight fitting and one with a 90° elbow fitting. Connect the 90° elbow fitting on the 56” oil hose to the JIC 90° elbow fitting (threaded into the “oil in” port of the oil filter adapter) and tighten using a 1 1/4” open end wrench. **NOTE** The JIC 90° elbow fitting on the oil filter adapter should still be able to swivel but the hose to fitting connection can be tightened. Connect the straight fitting on the 16” oil hose to the JIC straight fitting threaded into the “oil out” port of the oil filter adapter and tighten the connection using a 1 1/4” open end wrench. Next, locate the two 18mm bumper mounting bolts used to hold the bumper to the bumper frame rail (the bolts that thread through the bumper frame rail next to the tow hook). Insert these through the holes next to the driver side tow hook as if the bumper was being installed, mount the oil filter bracket to the backside of the bumper frame rail using these bolts, and then secure the oil filter bracket using the OEM hardware. Evaluate the routing of the oil hoses and adjust as needed (excess hose pushed into the engine bay, not rubbing on any sharp edges, etc.). Remember the JIC 90° elbow fitting threaded into the “oil out” port of the oil filter adapter? Adjust the angle of this fitting so it assists with the natural routing of the oil line. Most likely the fitting will be angled slightly towards the front of the truck. Tighten this fitting in the oil filter adapter using a 1 1/4” open end wrench. **TIP 2** Do not install the bumper at this time. After all components have been installed and fluids have been replaced, start the truck and visually inspect for leaks. It will be easier to look for and fix any leaks that are found if some of the larger vehicle parts have not been installed yet. **NOTE** My front bumper has aftermarket lights installed and the mounting location of the driver side light required me to modify the oil filter bracket. In my case, the oil filter adapter was lowered 3/4” by drilling new holes in the oil filter bracket and then the bracket was bent to move the oil filter closer to the frame rail.















44. Priming the system with oil. I purchased a $15 hand pump from Advance Auto to complete this step: Buy Performance Tools Multi Use Pump W1145 at Advance Auto Parts






Fill the oil filter included in the Bulletproof Diesel kit with oil and place it nearby (upright, so the oil doesn’t spill out). On the truck, remove the plastic cap covering the “oil in” port on the Bulletproof Diesel Oil Transfer Block and fill the HPOP reservoir with clean motor oil. Repeat this step for the “oil out” port of the Oil Transfer Block and then replace the plastic caps to prevent debris from entering the HPOP reservoir. Next, hold the end of the 56” oil hose on the passenger side of the truck upwards and slowly pump clean motor oil down the hose to the heat exchanger. **TIP** The higher you hold the end of the hose, the greater the chances of having the oil make it to the heat exchanger. We also ensured we could easily re-route the hose under the battery tray and then shifted the hose to try to get as much hose as possible higher than the port on the heat exchanger. Once oil begins to drain from the oil filter adapter in the driver side front wheel well, install the oil filter. This provides a visual confirmation that the heat exchanger is filling with oil. Continue to pump clean motor oil through the oil hose until the hose is full or nearly full, remove the plastic cap covering the “oil in” port on the Oil Transfer Block, and connect the passenger side oil hose to this port. Tighten using a 1 1/4” open end wrench. The driver side oil hose will be routed over the fuel lines that are connected to the oil filter / fuel filter housing, so we installed that and connected the fuel lines before connecting the oil hose to the Oil Transfer Block. Space around the Oil Transfer Block will be very limited regardless of which step is performed first.












45. Install the oil filter / fuel filter housing. **NOTE** The stand pipe will not be installed since the OEM oil filter is no longer used, nor are the T-45 Torx bolts. Use the four 8mm hex head bolts included in the Bulletproof Diesel kit to secure the oil filter / fuel filter housing to the Oil Transfer Block. The longer 8mm hex head bolts (40mm) will be installed on the passenger side of the Oil Transfer Block and the shorter 8mm hex head bolts (35mm) will be installed on the driver side of the Oil Transfer Block. First, locate the large OEM o-ring that went in between the oil filter / fuel filter housing and the OEM oil cooler. Place this into the groove on top of the Bulletproof Diesel Oil Transfer Block, then place the oil filter / fuel filter housing on top of the Oil Transfer Block. and torque to 11 ft/lbs. Thread the oil filter cap onto the top of the oil filter / fuel filter housing and tighten using a 36mm socket.









46. Connect the fuel lines to the oil filter / fuel filter housing. Just like during their removal, two lines need an 11/16” open end wrench, one line will require a 13/16” open end wrench, and the banjo bolt will require a 19mm open end wrench. The banjo bolt will also require two new copper washers or Viton sealing washers. Torque the passenger side fuel connection at the oil filter / fuel filter housing to 19 fl/lbs, the fuel line closest to front of the housing on the driver side to 32 ft/lbs, the middle line on the driver side to 19 ft/lbs, and the banjo bolt to 28 ft/lbs if copper washers are used (18 ft/lbs if Viton sealing washers are used).






47. Connect the radiator hoses. Connect the upper radiator hose (the large hose that comes off the back of the radiator at the top) to the top of the front cover. Ensure the two spring clamps are on the hose then slide one end of the hose over the fitting on the back of the radiator and the other end of the hose over the fitting on the front cover. Squeeze the spring clamps and slide them towards the ends of the hose so they’re over both the hose and fitting. Lower radiator hose: Ensure the worm style clamp is loosely mounted on the lower radiator hose (bottom of the radiator on the passenger side) and connect the hose to the fitting on the radiator. Slide the worm clamp down towards the end of the hose so it’s over both the hose and the fitting and tighten securely using a 7mm socket. Finally, ensure the pet**** at the bottom of the radiator on the driver side is closed.

48. Route / connect the driver side oil hose. Route the driver side oil hose under the air filter assembly, over the upper radiator hose, and over the fuel lines connected to the oil filter / fuel filter housing. Hold the open end of the hose that will connect to Oil Transfer Block upwards and fill the hose with clean motor oil until it is full or nearly full. Remove the plastic cap covering the “oil out” port on the Oil Transfer Block and connect the driver side oil hose to this port. Tighten using a 1 1/4” open end wrench. **NOTE** The driver side oil hose will be routed under the intercooler pipe that connects to the intake manifold but over the upper radiator hose.









49. Install the turbo pedestal and turbo. Use the four 10mm bolts to secure the turbo pedestal to the engine block and torque to 23 ft/lbs. Install the new drain tube o-rings included in the Bulletproof Diesel kit onto the drain tube, apply a light coat of clean engine oil to the o-rings, and insert the end of the drain tube into front of the HPOP cover. CAREFULLY position the turbo on the turbo pedestal and oil drain tube (any damage to the o-ring on the drain tube can cause oil leaks). Ensure the Y pipe (inlet) and down pipe (exhaust) are aligned at the rear of the turbo and loosely thread in the rear bolt of the turbo. Next, loosely thread in the two bolts that secure the front of the turbo to the turbo pedestal. The turbo should be seated on the turbo pedestal but capable of being shifted slightly to help fully align the Y pipe and down pipe. Some instructions recommend securing the Y pipe first, and others recommend securing the down pipe first. I chose to complete Y pipe first, then the down pipe. Once the Y pipe and turbo are lined up, tighten the clamp that holds the pipe and turbo together and torque to 53 in/lbs. Repeat for the down pipe but torque the down pipe clamp to 89 in/lbs. Starting at the rear most bolt, torque the three bolts that hold the turbo to the turbo pedestal to 28 ft/lbs. Next, install the oil feed tube. Replace the o-ring at the bottom of the tube with the new one supplied by Bulletproof Diesel, lightly coat the new o-ring with clean motor oil, and use the OEM locking bracket to secure the oil feed tube to the Oil Transfer Block. Torque the 8mm bolt on the bracket to 10 ft/lbs. Replace the gasket at the other end of the oil feed tube with the new one provided by Bulletproof Diesel and use the two 10mm bolts to secure the oil feed tube to the top of the turbo. Torque these bolts to 18 ft/lbs. Finally, connect the VGT electrical connector.

50. Install the turbo intake tube. Slide the turbo intake tube over the compressor inlet of the turbo. Ensure the two holes on the front of the turbo intake tube are through the bolts on the FICM bracket and then torque the clamp that holds the tube and turbo together to 9 ft/lbs and. Secure the turbo intake tube to the FICM bracket using two 10mm nuts and torque to 10 ft/lbs. Also see picture for Step 10.
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51. Install the degas bottle. Connect the engine vent hose (EGR cooler to degas bottle), radiator overflow hose, and degas bottle supply hose (underside of degas bottle). Slide the degas bottle into it’s mounting location and secure the bottle near the wiper cowl using two 8mm bolts. Torque the bolts to 89 in/lbs. Also see picture for Step 9.

52. Install the alternator. Place the alternator on the mounting bracket that is part of the intake manifold and thread in the three 13mm bolts that hold the alternator in place. Torque these bolts to 35 ft/lbs. Slide the ring terminal (for the cable that connects the alternator and passenger side battery) back on the post at the top of the alternator and secure the terminal using a 10mm nut. Finally, plug the two pin connector into the back of the alternator. Also see picture for Step 16.

53. Replace the accessory drive belt. Reference the picture for Step 15, and install the belt as shown in the insert. Release the catch on the tensioner pulley and ensure the belt is fully seated on the pulleys.

54. Install the intercooler pipes. Clean the insides of the intercooler pipes where they will connect with the intercooler, the intake manifold, and the turbo and also clean the surfaces where the pipes will connect. **TIP** After the surfaces are clean, apply a light coat of aerosol hair spray to help prevent the intercooler pipes from blowing off during vehicle operation. Slide the intercooler pipes back in place. Tighten the worm style clamps to 71 in/lbs and the spring style clamps to 9 ft/lbs. Also see the picture for Step 8.

55. Install the air filter assembly. As mentioned previously, the popularity of aftermarket intakes doesn’t make it feasible to provide the OEM steps and this documentation is for an Airaid CAI. Ensure the 8mm clamp is positioned on the air filter assembly tube and slide the air filter assembly tube over the turbo intake tube while aligning the front of the air filter assembly with the core support. Tighten the clamp securely. Insert the filter minder assembly into the air filter assembly tube and then connect the Mass Airflow sensor electrical connector. Also see the picture for Step 7.

56. Install the passenger side battery (or both batteries if both were removed). **NOTE** On the passenger side, the battery lugs should be oriented towards the windshield and not the front of the truck. Connect the positive battery connector on the truck to the positive terminal of the battery and the negative battery connector on the truck to the negative terminal of the battery. Tighten both connectors securely. To secure the battery to the tray, thread the long 7mm bolt with the wedge shaped piece at the end into bottom of the battery tray in front of the battery.

57. Replace fluids. Ensure the oil drain plug has been installed in the oil pan. Fill the engine with approximately 20 quarts (4 gallons) of clean motor oil. This amount includes what has already been used to prime the system. Confirm the engine oil level is correct on the oil dipstick. Next, fill the cooling system with a 50/50 mix of coolant and distilled water. **NOTE** Coolant can be purchased as a 50/50 pre-mix or as a concentrate. If concentrate was purchased, dilute it to a 1:1 ratio with distilled water before adding it to the truck. Add the coolant through the top of the degas bottle until the correct cold coolant level is reached.

58. Final inspection. The only parts that should have not been installed at this stage are the grill, the front bumper, and the sight shield. Search the engine bay for any tools that may have been left, electrical connectors that have not been plugged in, clamps that may not have been tightened, and anything that looks like it may interfere with proper vehicle operation.

59. Check for leaks. It’s time to start the engine. Ensure the batteries are fully charged, cross your fingers, say a prayer, bring out the lucky rabbit foot, or conduct whatever ritual brings you favor. Crank the engine for 30 seconds, then stop cranking and wait for 30 seconds. Repeat the 30 seconds cranking / 30 seconds waiting as needed until the engine starts. If the engine hasn’t started after six 30 second attempts, wait for 3-5 minutes before cranking the engine again. Once the engine starts, inspect all connections for leaks and fix as needed. **NOTE** The purpose of the 30 second cycles is to prevent the starter from burning up. The injectors are dependent on engine oil to operate, and nearly all of the engine oil was drained during this procedure. The process outlined in this step may have to be repeated numerous times until the engine starts. Once the engine starts, it will likely run rough for an extended period of time as a result of air in the system. This is normal and will usually resolve itself once the vehicle has been driven for 15-30 minutes.

60. Install the front bumper. **NOTE** This is another step that is much easier if some assistance is provided. Remove the two 18mm bolts next to the driver side tow hook holding the Bulletproof Diesel oil filter adapter in place and allow that assembly to temporarily hang by the oil hoses. Position the bumper to the front of the truck and insert the four 18mm bolts through the four holes near the tow hooks (two holes on the passenger side and two holes on the driver side). Use the OEM hardware to loosely secure the two bolts on the passenger side (the bumper still needs to be positioned correctly). On the driver side, install the oil filter assembly and bracket as before. Evaluate the routing of the oil hoses again and adjust as needed (excess hose pushed into the engine bay, not rubbing on any sharp edges, etc.). **TIP** Do not attempt to make final adjustments to the bumper mounting location until the grill is installed.









61. Install the grill. **TIP** Lay a towel across the top of the bumper to prevent scratches on the bumper and/or grill. Position the bottom of the grill in front of the core support and line up the clips that hold the bottom of the grill in place. Start at one side of the grill and insert the first clip, then gently push on the grill until it clicks in place. Repeat the process with the clips from one side of the grill to the other. Locate the four 5.5mm bolts that hold the top of the grill to the core support and hand tighten until the top of the grill is secured. DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN. Install the passenger side OEM bumper support bracket in the passenger side wheel well using the 13mm bolts. Finally, install the Bulletproof Diesel rock shield using the OEM 13mm bolts. This replaces the OEM bumper support bracket in the driver side wheel well and protects the oil filter from damage.






62. Recharge Air Conditioning
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Old 10-12-2012, 06:04 AM
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Just my luck...7 days and a couple hours ago I could of reeley used this!
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A little more detail would have been helpful.










JK! Awesome write up!

Sent from my phone that somebody didn't help me get.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kinnisoj View Post
Just my luck...7 days and a couple hours ago I could of reeley used this!
Sorry man! I typed as fast as I could. I remember seeing one of your posts indicating you were in the middle of the job and thought, "Man, I wish I had this thing done!"



Quote:
Originally Posted by southend View Post
A little more detail would have been helpful.





JK! Awesome write up!

Sent from my phone that somebody didn't help me get.


Thanks! I guess I SHOULD have included pictures of the oil drain plug and bumper bolts.
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