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Old 01-13-2011, 02:36 PM
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Truck running on after turned off

I keep getting more details on this truck i bought. Its a 2003 i am working on and was parked when the previous owner tried to shut it off and it kept on running and at a high rpm withthe key off. By the time he went to get a wrench to disconnect batteries it stopped running on its own (about a minute). Thats when i bought the truck (not knowing this at the time). I bought the truck as having a bad engine. It was locked up and wouldnt turn over. We drained the oil and got over 14 gallons out of it mostly diesel. We found that the engine was hydrolocked when we went to turn it over by hand to get to the converter bolts and by turning it backwards we were able to clear the cylinders and it now turns over freely. This engine i have since found out has only 18k on it and is a Ford reman replaced by ford. I am starting to wonder if it is actually a good engine with something incidental causing it to run on and then drain a bunch of fuel into the oil pan. Regardless i am still replacing the engine with another but would like to find out a cause to what might have created the problem so i know its not something that will happen to the new one. Also how would one go about checking out the old engine to see if it is still viable now that it is out of the truck? Thanks
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Old 01-13-2011, 04:08 PM
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If my memory serves me right, when you posted this earlier I noted that one or more injectors were probably injecting into weak cylinders and instead of the fuel being compressed and ignited during the compression stroke, worn or broken rings caused the fuel to slide down the piston walls and into the block.

Since you noted that there was 14 gallons of diesel in the oil, the oil was probably like watery soup and hence when the motor was turned off (fuel supply from the injectors shut down), the oil flowing thru the motor was so watery that it was passing thru the valve guides, pistons, rings and everywhere thereby allowing some further combustion post shut off.

Remember that diesels do not require an electrical ignition source. Provided they have fuel, air and compression that generates heat and ignition, the motors will keep running. I've seen tractors where the turbos have gone out pumping engine oil (which is used to lubricate the turbo) into the air intake and despite the fuel being shut off, the engine would rev uncontrollably until the block was drained of the oil. That, my friend, is one scary thing!

I would say you definately have tear down the motor and check for wear on each major component (e.g. crank, journals, etc). If the motor was ran for an extended period on the oil/diesel mixture, you probably have at minimum wear on the cylinders, etc.

Just my 2 cents.
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Old 01-13-2011, 04:32 PM
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Has the truck ever had a programmer on it?
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Old 01-13-2011, 05:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flint_smoke View Post
Has the truck ever had a programmer on it?
Not that i am aware of. It was owned by a geo physical company nearest i can tell and the guy that owned it before me drove it exactly 12 miles after he bought it before it went bad.

Last edited by DENALI; 01-13-2011 at 06:13 PM.
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Old 01-13-2011, 05:07 PM
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sounds like it has chit some injector(s) and is gonna git expensive.
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Old 01-13-2011, 09:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jd4010 View Post
If my memory serves me right, when you posted this earlier I noted that one or more injectors were probably injecting into weak cylinders and instead of the fuel being compressed and ignited during the compression stroke, worn or broken rings caused the fuel to slide down the piston walls and into the block.

Since you noted that there was 14 gallons of diesel in the oil, the oil was probably like watery soup and hence when the motor was turned off (fuel supply from the injectors shut down), the oil flowing thru the motor was so watery that it was passing thru the valve guides, pistons, rings and everywhere thereby allowing some further combustion post shut off.

Remember that diesels do not require an electrical ignition source. Provided they have fuel, air and compression that generates heat and ignition, the motors will keep running. I've seen tractors where the turbos have gone out pumping engine oil (which is used to lubricate the turbo) into the air intake and despite the fuel being shut off, the engine would rev uncontrollably until the block was drained of the oil. That, my friend, is one scary thing!

I would say you definately have tear down the motor and check for wear on each major component (e.g. crank, journals, etc). If the motor was ran for an extended period on the oil/diesel mixture, you probably have at minimum wear on the cylinders, etc.

Just my 2 cents.
True but these engines rely on electric fuel pumps and electronically controlled injectors. I would think some crazy phenomenon happened where at least two different components/systems failed simultaneously to cause the alleged run on. I say alleged cause thats the story that was given to DENALI and now he tryin to sort out the pieces to this puzzle.
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Old 01-14-2011, 05:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ironmover View Post
True but these engines rely on electric fuel pumps and electronically controlled injectors. I would think some crazy phenomenon happened where at least two different components/systems failed simultaneously to cause the alleged run on. I say alleged cause thats the story that was given to DENALI and now he tryin to sort out the pieces to this puzzle.
Totally agree with you! My train of thought was with having soooo much fuel in the crankcase that however it was getting in combined with the pressure being built up in the crankcase was causing just enough fuel to enter the chambers for some firing. I doubt it was running "perfectly smooth" but it would be enough to keep it turning over until the pressure in the engine reduced enough that the fuel was no longer entering the cyclinders.

I think regardless, DENALI has a mess on his hands!
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Old 01-14-2011, 06:12 AM
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I'd start by doing a compression check and pulling the injectors.
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Old 01-14-2011, 10:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jd4010 View Post
Totally agree with you! My train of thought was with having soooo much fuel in the crankcase that however it was getting in combined with the pressure being built up in the crankcase was causing just enough fuel to enter the chambers for some firing. I doubt it was running "perfectly smooth" but it would be enough to keep it turning over until the pressure in the engine reduced enough that the fuel was no longer entering the cyclinders.

I think regardless, DENALI has a mess on his hands!
Yea good possibility it was a shaking and knockin pretty good.
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