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Old 02-04-2010, 05:41 AM
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Block heater?

First off, I know where the plug is, and that it works. I just want to know how. Is it a heating element in the oil pan? If so, and theres nothing to circulate the warm oil, how does it start so easily when the oil in the rails in the heads is cold? Just curious, guys, I've looked and looked on here, but all I could find was folks asking where to find the plug...Thanks!
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Old 02-04-2010, 06:25 AM
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Its not. Its a plug in the side of the block. Right above the starter. Heats the coolant.
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Old 02-04-2010, 09:10 AM
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its an element in the coolant passage. heats the coolant to aid in starting in extreme cold temps.
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Old 02-04-2010, 11:21 AM
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Aha! Makes more sense to heat the coolant...thanks guys. I don't know about extreme cold though, with these IDP tunes, I have to plug it in when the temp is gonna get below 40 deg. Otherwise, it starts rough and clatters like an old IDI. And don't even think about driving off right away, talk about LOUD, and then theres this huge power surge...can't be good on a cold engine.
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Old 02-04-2010, 06:18 PM
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that may be, but with a stock truck you shouldnt have to plug it in til below 0 if everything is working as designed
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Old 02-04-2010, 06:23 PM
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than something must be wrong with my truck! I too have to plug it in when it dips in the 40's at night, and I'm in socal.
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Old 02-04-2010, 08:24 PM
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Originally Posted by doubleh1 View Post
than something must be wrong with my truck! I too have to plug it in when it dips in the 40's at night, and I'm in socal.
I'm relatively new here, but have spent a lot of time reading. What oil do you use? From what I've read, 5W-40 synthetic helps with cold start issues. I use 15W-40 dino because dealer gave me lifetime oil changes, well, as long as I own it. And changed every 3000.

Also, the newest flash of the FICM was supposed to help. If I remember reading it right. Please correct me if I'm mistaken.

( I'm never wrong, but I can be mistaken)
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Old 02-04-2010, 08:35 PM
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Will the FICM repair mentioned in another thread help with this?
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Old 02-05-2010, 06:23 AM
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From what I'm hearing, this flash has helped with cold start issues. I can't testify to this, I don't have this flash "yet". But am leaning toward it. Here is the pdf for this flash.

http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/fo..._211519_A1.pdf


[qoute]Will the FICM repair mentioned in another thread help with this?[quote]

If you are talking about soldering the connections in the FICM board, yes, If you already have tested the FICM for low voltage.

6.0's, FICM's and Cold Start Problems - Powerstroke Nation

6.0’s, FICM’s and cold-start issues.

If your 6.0 will not start cold, the issue may be injectors, the glow plugs or glow plug controller, or it can be the FICM (Fuel Injection Control Module). If after a long cranking with no start you get a lot of white smoke (raw unburnt fuel) out the exhaust, the problem is probably in the injectors or glow plug system. If you do not get any smoke, the problem is probably in the FICM. It is usually accompanied w/ multiple injector codes and a p0611 code.

The 6.0 injector has two solenoids on it; one turns the injector on (open) and the other turns it off (close). A few years ago, Ford came out with a new program referred to as inductive heating for the FICM, intended to combat issues with missing and rough-running during cold startup due to sticking spool valves in the injectors. This program works by running “extra” current through the close coil to generate heat and warm up the spool. On paper it was an excellent idea, and I advised a lot of potential injector customers to have their FICM’s reflashed rather than buy a set of injectors.

Based on my testing, it appears that the early models of FICM’s only used the inductive heating when the EOT was less than 48*F or so.
The “first” updated heating strategy turned it on any time the EOT was less than 184*F:

meaning every time you started the truck (if it had been shut off for more than 10 minutes) that the inductive heat was used!

Ford’s newest update to the heating strategy has it coming on below 148*F; better, but that’s still a lot of current draw.

Unfortunately, there have been some very serious consequences.
Although the FICM on the 6.0 is way more “intelligent” than the IDM on a 7.3, its basic job is to convert 12VDC to 48VDC and deliver this to the injectors at the proper time. Under normal operating conditions, the FICM typically draws 6-7 amps at 12V into the FICM power supply, which is well within its design limits.

However, with the inductive heating active this current draw increases to 24-32 amps—it pegs the 30 amp meter on my test bench! Although the FICM power supply is capable of sustaining this load for short periods of time (1-2 minutes) it eventually gets very hot.

If this was all that happened, things wouldn’t be too bad, but there are several components on the printed circuit board that were not properly soldered during the manufacturing process, and as the PCB heats up and expands, the solder under these components cracks and they lose their electrical connection.

The FICM’s 48 volt power supply is actually four separate or independent units; if one of the four goes down, the other three can supply enough current to run the truck, even with the inductive heating active. If two of the four go out, the truck will start and run normally as long as it is warm out. i.e. as long as the inductive heating does not turn on.

If three of the four go out, the truck will probably not start or run unless it is at full operating temperature, and even then it may not start.
If the injector voltage is over 35 volts, they run OK, although not as well as when it is 48 volts.

If the voltage drops below around 24 volts, the injectors cannot fire.
While most scan tools will display the FICM voltage, they do not always show the correct value.

For instance, AutoEngenuity can only display voltages between 40 to 56 volts, so if the voltage is 35, it will display 40.

How to check your FICM for proper voltage output.
(Perform this check when the engine is completely cold.)

1. Remove the two bolts that hold the coolant reservoir to the cowl and push the reservoir out of the way forward and to your right. You do not need to disconnect any of the hoses.

2. On top of the FICM is a small cover held on by two #20 Torx screws; remove these two screws and pry the cover off.

3. On 2003 and early 2004 trucks, you will see 7 screw heads under the cover. On 2004 and later trucks you will see 4 screws.

PROCEDURE for 4 SCREW FICM
http://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/pi...ictureid=19314

4a. Take a multi-meter set on DC volts and connect the ground lead to battery negative, and with the key ON measure the voltage at the screw on your right—closest to the driver’s side fender. Do not let the probe short against the case! The voltage should be right at 48 volts. Anything between 47 and 49 is good.

5a. Have an assistant cycle the key and measure the voltage during the initial key-on buzz test. Voltage should not drop below 46 volts.

6a. Next measure the voltage while cranking the engine. If voltage stays at or above 45-46 volts, the FICM is fine. Abnormally low battery voltage can give a false low FICM voltage reading, so make sure your batteries are good.

The procedure is the same for FICM’s with 7 screws, except that you will be checking voltage at a different screw, as shown in this picture.

PROCEDURE for 7 SCREW FICM
http://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/pi...ictureid=19315

4b. Repeat step 4 above (multi meter step) but put the positive lead on the left-most screw in the row of 4 screws.
Do not let the probe short against the case!

5b. Same as 5a above

6b. Same as 6a above

If the voltage is above 46 volts in all the tests, your FICM is in excellent condition.

If it is between 36 and 45 volts its OK, but not great. If it is between 25 and 35 volts, you have serious FICM problems.

Swamp’s states that they able to repair most FICM’s with low voltage problems, but some units may be either fried beyond repair, or the time it would take to repair them would be more than a good used FICM costs. If you send your unit in to them for repair, the price is $350.00. There is no charge if it cannot be fixed

They can also step the voltage up from 48 to 58 volts for an additional $50.00. All units have a 1-year warranty. Due to a lack of FICM cores, you will have to send your unit in for repair.
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  #10  
Old 02-05-2010, 06:42 PM
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My problem is that Im not allowed to use extension cord running through the parking spot where my truck is, since Im living in the condominium, it is prohibited. Im asking for your help, guys please could you suggest something to me in this case, Im at ~ -20C right now, maybe there is some other options to make my truck not suffer that much in the winter time. Thanks in advance.
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