How much for trucker's training? - Ford Powerstroke Diesel Forum
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post #1 of 29 Old 09-10-2009, 08:56 PM Thread Starter
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How much for trucker's training?

After I graduate high school, I was thinking of completing truck driver's training so I can get my CDL and I was gonna need it anyway for some jobs.
But, how much money does it cost to complete training?

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post #2 of 29 Old 09-12-2009, 06:50 AM
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Driver Training


If you are just graduating from high school, I reckon you are nowhere close to 21 years of age. Most companies won't touch you if you are under 21 because you will only be eligible to drive "intrastate" (in your home state only). Obviously, you can find work - but your choices will be limited. If you are dead-set on driving at 18, try a beverage distributor (Coke, Pepsi, etc.) - as some of them have their own "in house" training programs to help get a CDL.

Consider a military enlistment (no, I am not joking) for three years after high school. They have career tracks (MOS) for transportation - rail, ship and truck - for which you will be trained very well at no cost to you.


When your enlistment is over and you separate from the service, you will be able to write your own ticket and will have "experience" in the field. Not to mention the fact that you will be somewhat older & wiser than you were when you walked out of your high school for the last time.

Many companies will prefer you to be 23 years of age - primarily for insurance purposes....since it saves them money. It all depends on what you want and where the openings are at the time.


Last time I checked, the going rate was three or four thousand dollars for a Class A license & a training school certificate. A Class A is for tractor-trailers, obviously, and some places offer a cheaper Class B (cement mixer, oil truck, some buses, heavy straight truck, etc.) course of instruction. My recommendation to you is to get your Class A (which is what I have), and do your best to get the three endorsements (Hazmat, tanker and doubles) as soon as possible.

Some companies out there will pay for your schooling, with the condition that you work for them at least one year. They are all "dweller" outfits that will require you to be on the road and away for home several weeks at a time. Being a young lad, that would be neat; but very hard after you are old (like me) and have a family, house, yard, pets, etc., etc.


See if your local community college has classes available on weekends; so that you can still keep your "regular" job while you are learning. The options are wide open and companies always need drivers.

Good luck to you, kid!


P.S. Just do an Internet search on "truck driving schools" and see what pops up in your region.


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post #3 of 29 Old 09-12-2009, 07:02 AM
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I really have to agree with this guy. I joined the Army for the experience too. It is free training that is as good as anything you will find out there.

Idaho is a good sized state but there is not a big net work of instate hauling available. I was originally going to suggest looking in to driving Log truck if you were dead set on doing it after high school but with the way things are right no it is not steady work and more and more they are having to travel to out of state mills.

Just check the web for help but dont be to quick to pass on the military!

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post #4 of 29 Old 09-13-2009, 03:47 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for input guys!
I have thought of looking into logging trucks, because they stay in state and work about 12 hours a day, hauling from the forest to my town to the mill.

And I've given the military some thought, but am not too sure about it...

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post #5 of 29 Old 09-13-2009, 03:52 PM
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you can start with a dump truck also.. about 5 to 7 thousand for the school I think

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post #6 of 29 Old 09-13-2009, 04:18 PM
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It depends on what kinda trucking you want to do. Honestly trucker colleges are a waist of money. Where i live, there is a place that will rent you a truck and a trainer for 1-2 hrs and they will teach you a few quick things, then you take your road test. All this for around 200 bucks. I started driving for a cement company. I drove dump trucks and mostly mixers. They were willing to teach me how to drive and i learned quickly. The best part was i learned from my own mistakes and i have NO college debt. The trainers in college will teach you how to drive the way THEY like to drive. I for one don't even know how to double clutch. They teach you up here to double clutch when you shift. Anyone who knows how to really drive a truck will tell you nothing is harder on a clutch/trans combo than double clutching, plus your leg gets sore. If you want to go over the road, there are lots of companies that will give you paid training. Just some things to think about.

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post #7 of 29 Old 09-14-2009, 05:08 PM
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While I don't always "double clutch" and have mastered the ability to 'float' gears without using the clutch pedal, it is still a virtual necessity to learn double-clutching if you wish to drive a non-synchronized manual transmission. This is espcially true if you get a very new truck and have to pull a heavy load with it.

I never went to trucker school, but was fortunate enough to work for a large company that had trucks of all sizes and various types. I tagged along with a tractor-trailer driver on my own time (after working 10 to 11 hours already) and he taught me the ropes.

We went to empty parking lots, service roads, etc., etc.; and I practiced ad nauseam by moving trailers around at our terminal. Practice, practice, practice!

It was different 'back in the day' than it is now, and most companies will want xx years of verifiable experience or some type of certificate.

Anyway; good luck!


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post #8 of 29 Old 09-14-2009, 05:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JK23112 View Post

While I don't always "double clutch" and have mastered the ability to 'float' gears without using the clutch pedal, it is still a virtual necessity to learn double-clutching if you wish to drive a non-synchronized manual transmission. This is espcially true if you get a very new truck and have to pull a heavy load with it.

I never went to trucker school, but was fortunate enough to work for a large company that had trucks of all sizes and various types. I tagged along with a tractor-trailer driver on my own time (after working 10 to 11 hours already) and he taught me the ropes.

We went to empty parking lots, service roads, etc., etc.; and I practiced ad nauseam by moving trailers around at our terminal. Practice, practice, practice!

It was different 'back in the day' than it is now, and most companies will want xx years of verifiable experience or some type of certificate.

Anyway; good luck!
i agree with the bold section, get on with a company that has trucks. Even if the job is not truck related, get to know the drivers and get a CDL permit. Most of em would be more than willing to help you learn, I'd imagine. Right now I drive 5 days a week with my Class B driving a straight box truck. I have my Class B license and a Class A permit. I got a job promotion where I'm going to be driving tractor trailers and luckily enough my company is going to pay for truck driving school for me.

I have been learning how to drive a tractor trailer from my buddy that drives a tractor trailer for my company. I'll finish my night at work and go out with him and practice driving (highway, parking lots, a big business park with traffic lights and stop signs and turns) it's been GREAT, when I do go to tuck driving school I feel like I'll be able to excel and learn as much as I can.

Just look for jobs that are with companies that have trucks or deal with trucks and you can get connections and connections are always good I LOVE what I do

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post #9 of 29 Old 09-14-2009, 05:39 PM
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i am kinda wish i went to the military every now and then. but i am going to school for this in 9 months. because ill be 21 then
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post #10 of 29 Old 09-14-2009, 06:07 PM
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i was a 88m (gear jammer) in the army. dont do it. just pay. they dont use manual trannies anymore, which makes you a glorified pickup truck driver. i actually showed the instructors up. go ahead and do it itll give you a career to fall back if you decide to change careers and that doesnt work out. i never use the clutch. only to get er into starting gear or reverse and start and stop. once you get floating gears down youll never go back to double clutching.
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