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  #1  
Old 05-31-2012, 12:35 PM
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Dynamat/Damplifier- Where? How Much?

Anyone have pics of it in a Ex? MY imagination leads me to believe that we have a bit more work to do in the back than the Super Duty crowd.


anyone done it? anyone have any suggestions/pics?
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Old 05-31-2012, 01:01 PM
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I did Dynamat Extreme in my SD, IIRC it was 6 boxes including inside and outside of the doors. The best prices I could find at the time were on ebay. Figure out how much of the truck you want to cover and get out the tape measure, add 20% to cover for irregularities and you should be in the ballpark. Figure 1/3 box per door, 2/3 if doing both inside and outside of the door. Be sure to clean the surfaces well and use a rubber roller to get good adhesion. I also recommend wearing gloves, the foil backing is stiff and will cut you up. That can get old real fast if you use alcohol for clean up like I did.
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Old 05-31-2012, 01:09 PM
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Here is my wife's Expedition.....





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Old 05-31-2012, 01:18 PM
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well what i read was basically 2 trains of thought on the whole thing, 1) cover whats obvious 2) go to town.

MP how many SF was that? How effective? how much $ ?
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Old 05-31-2012, 04:34 PM
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Go to theDP web page and look at the excursion project he has done.
He installed something similar in his ex.
Probably a great resource for information.
I'm curious as well because I'm considering doing this as well
2003 7.3L Excursion - Project Test Vehicles.
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Old 05-31-2012, 08:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AggieExcursion2010 View Post
well what i read was basically 2 trains of thought on the whole thing, 1) cover whats obvious 2) go to town.
That really depends on your budget and intended use. If you are the only one ever in the truck, just cover the front wheel wells, floor and as much of the firewall as you can reach. If your running a large sound system, sealing everything, reenforcing the roof and multiple layers of deadener and insulation are what you would be looking at.
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Old 06-01-2012, 06:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AggieExcursion2010 View Post
well what i read was basically 2 trains of thought on the whole thing, 1) cover whats obvious 2) go to town.

MP how many SF was that? How effective? how much $ ?
I believe I used 2 bulk kits and a trunk kit on this vehicle. Bulk kits are 36 sq ft. and the trunk kits are 20 sq ft.

This did all 4 doors (inside and out) and the entire floor. I also used carpet pad in the driver passenger and second row areas. The result is excellent. Vehicle is super quite on the road at 75 mph and it feels like you could fire a gun inside and nobody outside would be the wiser . I work for Stinger so price wasn't a concern. The floor, doors and roof are the most important places to do. Especially where the wheels, tranny and exhaust are.

I cant believe the difference it made in my F250.
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Old 06-07-2012, 05:07 AM
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Learn about sound deadening before you waste time and money on materials that are not optimal. You do NOT need that much vibration damper. It is a waste of money to do complete coverage like that. Your goal is simply to get rid of the panel resonance. Then install a noise barrier: MLV. Mass loaded vinyl is the product you use to block the noise.

Go over to DIYMA and learn a bit...or if you don't mind going to a commercial site, the information is well summarized here.

At this moment I am taking a break from my Excursion where I am finishing putting MLV under some trim panels prior to buttoning up the front seating area. My wife has noted the DRAMATIC drop in interior sound at each step. I have just finished the MLV application on the front doors (along with speaker installation) and adding as much MLV between the engine and passenger compartments as possible.

Yes, people see a good bit of improvement from going wall-to-wall with CLD (constrained layer dampers = damplifier, dynamat, etc). But that is NOT the optimal use, and for a given sound reduction as a noise barrier, MLV is far more effective and cheaper. Use these products as they are designed, and you will be quite pleased.

Tell you what: here is a cut & paste from an email Don (sound deadener showdown) sent me. This is a material list as well as a very good set of directions as far as how to go about it. If you are going to do it, do it right.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

I have a set of measurements for an Excursion, but I'm not sure of the year. Here they are:

Fr Dr ext sheet metal ht-35 in w- 50 1/2 in
Fr Dr int trim panel ht-31in w-40in
R Dr ext sheet metal ht-35in w-40 1/2in
R dr int trim panel ht-30in w-32 1/2in
Cargo dr ext sheet metal ht-23 1/4in w-29 7/8in
Cargo dr int trim panel ht-18 1/2in w-21 1/4in
Floor up firewall to front edge of 3rd row riser length 9ft 10in.
Front row width 6ft 5in. Second row width 5ft 9in
Third row riser ht-5 1/2in w-51 1/2in
Cargo fl length 61in w-57in
Roof length 10ft 11in w-62in
Quarter-panels ht-34in w-82in
Third row pillars ht-18in w-10in
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

I built the following estimate from them:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Front Doors (each):
8 CLD Tiles, outer skin
4 CLD Tiles, cut into smaller pieces where necessary, inner skin
Extruded Butyl Rope
8.7 ft² MLV
8.7 ft² 1/4" CCF
3 Velcro Strips, adhesive 2 sides

Rear Doors (each):
6 CLD Tiles, outer skin
3 CLD Tiles, cut into smaller pieces where necessary, inner skin
Extruded Butyl Rope
6.8 ft² MLV
6.8 ft² 1/4" CCF
2.5 Velcro Strips, adhesive 2 sides

Cargo Door:
3 CLD Tiles, outer skin
1 CLD Tiles, cut into smaller pieces where necessary, inner skin
Extruded Butyl Rope?
2.8 ft² MLV
2.8 ft² 1/4" CCF
2 Velcro Strips, adhesive 2 sides

Clean the outer skin thoroughly. No matter how clean the rest of the vehicle is, the inside of the doors is likely to be filthy. I use denatured alcohol on a rag. Wipe it down until the rag comes out clean.

Start by pressing Extruded Butyl Rope (EBR) between the outer skin and the side impact protection beams. Leave gaps every few inches to allow water to drain. Cut some strips from a heavy plastic bag and press them into the top surface of the EBR to protect it from dirt.

Apply half the CLD Tiles allocated to the outer skin above and half below the side impact protection beam. Cut 2 more CLD Tiles into smaller pieces and apply them to the inner door skin.

Hang MLV on the inner door skin using Velcro Strips with pressure sensitive adhesive on both sides. The strips are 2"X4" but you can cut them in half for this application (most applications really). Start with 2 pieces in the top corners to hold the MLV in place while you trim it to fit. You want it to be as large as it can be - just barely fitting inside the trim panel when it is replaced. You will need to cut some holes in the MLV to allow cables, rods, shafts, wires, clips and the speakers to come through. You want these holes to be as small as possible. Every place we use MLV we are building a barrier and a barrier needs to be as large and contiguous as possible.

It helps during the fitting process to periodically remove the MLV from the door and lay it in the trim panel to test fit it. The Velcro makes this easy. When you first hang the MLV on the door, cut holes where the trim panel clips go into the door. You can then use these holes to orient the MLV inside the trim panel.

When you are satisfied with the MLV fit, add two more Velcro Strip pieces to the bottom corners. It's generally a good idea to add a third piece on top for added strength. Finally, use HH-66 Vinyl Cement to tack a layer of closed cell foam (CCF) on the side of the MLV facing the trim panel. When the trim panel is reinstalled, the CCF will compress slightly, getting rid of rattles and buzzes in the trim panel itself and between the trim panel and the inner door skin.

Floor:
19 CLD Tiles
63.1 ft² MLV
63.1 ft² 1/4" CCF

I've specified 1/2 the number of CLD Tiles the area would normally indicate. Most vehicles have some stock vibration damper on the floor. Assuming it is in good condition and you don't intend to pull it out, this should be enough to treat the bare metals areas. There's nothing to be gained from adding CLD Tiles on top of existing material.

Cut 1/4" CCF to fit the bottoms of the floor pans and up into the foot wells and lay it in place. You really don't need any adhesive or other attachment products for the floor. Gravity, the carpet and trim panels will hold everything in place. Finally, lay MLV on top of the CCF, extending up and over the center tunnel, sills and everywhere you can without interfering with trim panel replacement. You will need to cut holes for the seat bolt downs and seat belt anchors if they are on the floor. Again, make these holes as small as possible. You are basically upholstering the floor with MLV. MLV is quite flexible and will easily follow a simple curve. Where it needs to be fitted to complex curves you will need to do some cutting. Use HH-66 to seal the seams in the MLV as you go.

Third Row ledge, Riser:
I don't see a length for the ledge. Going to assume 12 inches.
4 CLD Tiles
6.3 ft² MLV
6.3 ft² 1/8" CCF
3 Velcro Strips, adhesive 2 sides

Here's how I hang MLV and 1/8" CCF on vertical surfaces, or anchor it on horizontal surfaces where it won't be held in place by the vehicle's interior components:
http://www.sounddeadenershowdown.com...ide_Velcro.pdf

Cargo Floor:
14 CLD Tiles
24.2 ft² MLV
24.2 ft² 1/8" CCF
3 Velcro Strips, adhesive 2 sides

Roof:
34 CLD Tiles

CLD Tiles are the only critical acoustical treatment for the roof. If you are interested in adding thermal insulation, a layer of 1/4" CCF is worth considering.

Quarter Panels (each):
12 CLD Tiles
19.4 ft² MLV
19.4 ft² 1/8" CCF
6 Velcro Strips, adhesive 2 sides

Third Row Pillars (each):
1 CLD Tile, cut in half (3"X 10")
1.3 ft² MLV
1.3 ft² 1/8" CCF
1 Velcro Strip, adhesive 2 sides

General Notes
HH-66 is a contact adhesive that will only bond materials with vinyl content. That means MLV to MLV, CCF (like the material I sell with vinyl content) to CCF and MLV to CCF. You need to coat both surfaces and let them dry until just tacky, 3-5 minutes. Press the two parts together. The bond is more than strong enough to work with immediately. It will achieve its full strength after a few hours.In most cases you won't need to coat the entire surface - tacking in a few spots is usually sufficient.

Velcro Strips can be cut in half (2”X2”) for all but the most demanding applications. When working with the self-adhesive side(s) of the Velcro Strips press the entire assembly into place. It is a good idea to gently separate the hook and loop sides and press them down by individually to make sure the bond is complete.

Totals:
143 CLD Tiles
2 rolls Extruded Butyl Rope
168.8 ft² MLV
96.9 ft² 1/4" CCF
71.9 ft² 1/8" CCF
33 Velcro Strips, adhesive 2 sides
1 32 oz can HH-66 Vinyl Contact Cement
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Old 06-11-2012, 02:27 PM
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The Damplifier Pro is arguably the best deadener on the market, but for the price, the Audiotechnix 80mil is a great alternative.

If you are looking to stop rattling from a stereo, give the vehicle a layer of Damplifier Pro. If you are looking to quiet down the ride, do a layer of deadener on the vehicle, then do a layer of Luxury Liner Pro. If you have noisy tires, spraying the fender wells with a few coats of Spectrum will help quiet those down.
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Old 06-12-2012, 07:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnotherStroker View Post
Learn about sound deadening before you waste time and money on materials that are not optimal. You do NOT need that much vibration damper. It is a waste of money to do complete coverage like that.
That's funny... When you apply Roadkill Expert and Roadkill Carpet pad in layers and test after each layer with an RTA you have concrete proof of what is doing what when it comes to dampening.

This is what I did. I know what works for these vehicles as I have done about a dozen of them and I have the decibel readings to back it up. I understand certain products have certain properties but when applied in real world applications it's amazing how they perform better than expected.

I believe that anyone who has the tools to do some testing will find exactly what I have.

Quote:
The Damplifier Pro is arguably the best deadener on the market, but for the price, the Audiotechnix 80mil is a great alternative.
Can't forget Stinger Expert Roadkill is also at the 80mil thickness.
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