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Old 02-17-2013, 09:44 AM
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oil pan woes... WHOA...

So I just bought my truck and have muddled my way through destroyed rear breaks, and not working power windows (had to replace the fuse panel) and a few other minor odds and ends. I replaced my oil and replaced the gasket on the plug as it seemed to be leaking, only to see more leaking on the ground.

Mind you, I did the oil change in the dark outside ( I know, pitty me) however, now that I'm looking, it "appears" as though the oil pan is dripping from the front of the pan and may even have been patched with some kind of epoxy!? First, I'm wondering if a rusted through oil pan is common on these.. second, I'm wondering what my options are on this if indeed it turns out to be a lousy epoxy pan repair that is leaving a puddle in my driveway. I tried searching threads and didn't come up with much on replacing or repairing the oil pan. Is it possible to simply scrub and weld these? Is pulling the whole motor the only option on replacement? Should I just go cry myself to sleep? what to do, what to do ....
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Old 02-17-2013, 10:01 AM
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First, yea it Is a common issue...

Next, the right way to fix it is to pull the engine then, once on a stand, it can be turned upside-down and resealed (this is what Ford recommends, otherwise the oil that seeps down the inside block walls contaminates the seal). I think there are guys doing it by just lifting it partially out, not inverting it, but you'd be taking a chance.

Welding isn't option, the metal has corroded so thin there's nothing to weld to.

Another option is to "patch" the whole bottom with a system these guys have come-up with. I'm not sure how well it stands up, not every pan is going to be a candidate I don't think, but I haven't heard anything bad about it either.

Damian Frattasio - YouTube
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Old 02-17-2013, 01:57 PM
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its possible it aint your oil pan, but the top of the motor. Crawl up and look down in the middle of it..(valley), see if theres oil residue. There's an opening toward the back of the valley, pass side, where if enough oil accumulates, it'll drain down the back, in front of the oil pan.

If there is oil, make sure its oil and not fuel. If oil, check the hpop area and under the turbo, where the ebpv rod protrudes from it...common failures.
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Old 02-18-2013, 04:54 AM
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Please fill out your signatures before you post for help. Sure makes it a lot easier to know what we are working on and where you live and temps you are having issues at etc.......
The 7.3's are known to leak where the dipstick enters the pan. There is a O Ring there that get's old and it leaks, boy do I know this problem. Have had it on my 2000 and my sons 1996 OBS. I have done the IH rip off of a fix, and it worked for a short term. I don't like the idea of smearing a bunch of sealant into the area, but I also can't swing 2 grand to pull the motor either. No secret Ford should have used a alumium pan in this area.
Another expensive fix is this one. I have never used it, just shown by a friend.

http://shop.strictlydiesel.com/store...ter_repair_kit

I have had Scott at TU replace my O ring four times and it always starts again. No Scott's fault, it is just a bad design and I got tired of bothering him with it. While preparing my sons truck for the brutal ND Winter, I used KBS on all exposed frame rails, oil pan and other areas. It is similar to POR 15 but better. I contacted the owner and he agreed that his product would solve this issue. I did the three step kit and leak is sealed. I used aprox 8 coats, looks ugly as sin as this stuff will run hours later, but the leak is sealed. Of course doing the entire pan should have been done before it ever started to rust. Come Spring I will be doing the same for my truck. I have been meaning to do a write up on this fix, maybe this weekend, not on the forums much due to health issues.
I agree, it could be coming from above, so make sure you follow the oil trail back to the source. You can get UV dye at most auto parts stores that will help you do this.
Later
NCHornet
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Old 02-18-2013, 12:18 PM
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Thanks for the inputs. I will double check the leak, but at a glance it appeared that there was lumpiness that looked like maybe a JB weld kinda crap on the bottom corner/middle of the pan that was dripping pretty heavily. I will most definitely need to do some kind of patch for now. I have the skills, but not the engine hoist, engine stand, garage, heated garage, or other things I would want to do the 'right thing' on it. If I was pulling the engine, I'd be hoping to do something more than just an oil pan.. good grief, shame on you Ford! Sorry about the signature, I'm new and hadn't found where to make one just yet and spaced putting my details in the original post.

Now a technical detail. When I was thinking of welding, I was actually thinking of forming a square plate to cover the whole corner and half of the bottom portion of the pan and welding a seal plate over the entire trouble area (if in fact that's the problem). Then maybe getting it sprayed with bed-liner. Any chance of that working? I know welding direct on worn through rust is a no go generally. Thoughts on this idea are welcome. I did also see some kind of a fiberglass cover thing online that some guy in michigan is using that looked awkward but maybe functional and pretty much makes a sort of cup around the whole drop portion of the pan that looked better than a jbweld patch anyway.
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Old 05-02-2013, 03:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCHornet View Post
Please fill out your signatures before you post for help. Sure makes it a lot easier to know what we are working on and where you live and temps you are having issues at etc.......
The 7.3's are known to leak where the dipstick enters the pan. There is a O Ring there that get's old and it leaks, boy do I know this problem. Have had it on my 2000 and my sons 1996 OBS. I have done the IH rip off of a fix, and it worked for a short term. I don't like the idea of smearing a bunch of sealant into the area, but I also can't swing 2 grand to pull the motor either. No secret Ford should have used a alumium pan in this area.
Another expensive fix is this one. I have never used it, just shown by a friend.

http://shop.strictlydiesel.com/store...ter_repair_kit

I have had Scott at TU replace my O ring four times and it always starts again. No Scott's fault, it is just a bad design and I got tired of bothering him with it. While preparing my sons truck for the brutal ND Winter, I used KBS on all exposed frame rails, oil pan and other areas. It is similar to POR 15 but better. I contacted the owner and he agreed that his product would solve this issue. I did the three step kit and leak is sealed. I used aprox 8 coats, looks ugly as sin as this stuff will run hours later, but the leak is sealed. Of course doing the entire pan should have been done before it ever started to rust. Come Spring I will be doing the same for my truck. I have been meaning to do a write up on this fix, maybe this weekend, not on the forums much due to health issues.
I agree, it could be coming from above, so make sure you follow the oil trail back to the source. You can get UV dye at most auto parts stores that will help you do this.
Later
NCHornet
Hope you are feeling better... I got waylaid in this repair by a broken arm myself. Did you get a chance to do your truck and write up your repair. I'm now considering first patching the hole with a fiberglass gas tank repair kit, then painting over it with sealants that take longer to dry. The fiberglass should dry pretty quickly, plus I learned online that you can put a vacuum on the oil fill pipe to keep suction on the holes to prevent contamination until you get the patch set. I figure this should give me a good initial seal, then I can paint it over repeatedly with sealant that shouldn't get contaminated after the initial patch is over the holes.
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Old 07-20-2013, 05:06 PM
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how to "fix" your oil pan for under $100

So, in case some other poor soul decides to look at this thread in search of information. Here's what I went through in repairing this problem.

First: The previous owner's JB weld repair was so contaminated it popped off very easily with a screw driver, and I found the small hole(s) that were the culprits. I let the pan drain for 2 days, yes 2 days, it was still dripping.

Second: , I borrowed an disc air sander from a buddy and used a rough grit pad to clean the bottom of the pan. The disc sander was a charm and just the thing for this job. I really spent a good amount of time on this, and got it to bare metal and did my best to scrub with a wire brush around the pitting and such.

Third: After blowing it off, and wiping it off with brake cleaner and making sure it was all clean and prepped I sprayed a rust reformer paint on the pan to try to stop any little rust gremlins present and prevent future ones. (without contaminating anything inside, obviously) Most of this was waste and removed afterward

Fourth: I TRIED (very hard) to put a fresh, JB patch over the hole with the intent of then patching over that with other stuff ... I really put serious time and energy into cleaning and prepping and keeping the thing from getting contaminated. First attempt, failed utterly. Second attempt, I gently put a very slight upward dent in the hole in the pan with a wood handle. (aka so that the hole was "higher" than the surrounding metal slightly. I was thinking that any oil build up would settle away from my JB hole while it cured. It looked beautiful, but it too failed. In frustration, after seeing some stuff on you tube on this issue, I put a small vacuum on the mouth of the oil filler to help put a vaccuum on the system and "pull" oil away from the holes to prevent contamination ... this resulted in the JB wanting to pull into the pan itself ... I decided that was BAD as I don't want chunks of JB working through my internals, so I stopped it right away ... Fourth attempt, forget it, JB weld sucks and is crap, I've literally NEVER seen a good repair with it, I gave it a great chance, i moved on.

Fifth: I cleaned the pan beautifully (AGAIN). This time I started by using a fast setting fiberglass repair kit intended for fuel tanks that I picked up at Auto Zone. I figured if it can hold up to fuel, it can hold up to oil. Now, the trouble with this was that working quickly under the truck on the ground is a B*&#H. I first pre-cut my fiberglass into small appropriate shaped pieces that I could apply. Then I mixed my epoxy and set to work. In theory, with fiberglass you want to paint it on the surface to apply to, then apply your fiberglass, paint another of coat of resin over that to soak it, repeat per layer. Trouble is, in that wicked little space, by the time I had mixed the 2 part resin to my satisfaction and got a layer painted on the pan, then applied the cloth and began painting over it, the resin set too fast and I couldn't actually finish completely painting the outside layer of resin... but the cloth was impregnated from the front and there and seemed solid. For the record, this patch was about 3 square inches around the hole of resin and fiberglass.

Sixth: I carefully re-sanded the new patch to get rid of drips and creases and make it a nice bonding surface. I even blended the edges with the pan. Then I used a slower setting fiberglass kit meant for body repairs (also purchased at Auto-zone). This one had a 10 or so minute cure time IIRC. I made 2 much larger patches that covered basically the whole front of the drop in the pan, and which also wrapped around the front corner, and up the sides a little and shaped around the drain plug area. I put it on as described, 2 separately done layers with a light sand between, meaning a total of 3 layers of fiberglass over the hole, with a nice wide coverage of connection around the holes and the edges of the pan.

Seventh: I went ahead and painted black heat worthy paint all over the repair in several layers and let it dry (some of it with engine heat in the next step

Eighth: I put oil in, prayed, and watched for leaks.. I drove a little, prayed, watched for leaks, I drove some more, rinse and repeat, and in the end, I now am almost due for an oil change, haven't added any oil, haven't dripped anything but a very slight smudge due to the drain plug, not the pan. I've rechecked the repair again and again, and it seems to be holding really well. I wouldn't call this a permanent repair, but I'm pretty happy with it, and have relaxed a bit about it and don't check it every day now, or at all really. Now for some pics
Attached Thumbnails
oil pan woes... WHOA...-cleaned-pan.jpg   oil pan woes... WHOA...-culprit.jpg   oil pan woes... WHOA...-jb-fail.jpg   oil pan woes... WHOA...-fiberglass-patch.jpg   oil pan woes... WHOA...-finished-pan.jpg  

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