Anti-seize and lug nuts?... - Ford Powerstroke Diesel Forum
Powerstroke.org is the premier Diesel Truck Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-16-2012, 05:52 PM
Powerstroke.org Fanatic
 

Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 130
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Anti-seize and lug nuts?...

I was having my tires balanced and rotated the other day at a national chain that I've done business with for many years, and the mechanic working on my truck made an interesting observation / correction. When I was pointing out to him the appropriate torque for the wheel lugs, he asked if I had anti-seize on the lug-nut studs. I told him yes, and experience over the past 20+ years has taught me that's the way to do it, or you're just begging to be on the side of the road somewhere with a flat (usually in the middle of winter), and you'll just be mf-ing the lug nuts because you won't be able to break them free.

The mechanic indicated that anti-seize does not allow the true torque to be achieved on the lug nuts, and in fact can produce an over-torque condition. I've never heard anything like that. Can anyone else chime in if there's any truth to that? Thanks guys.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2  
Old 05-16-2012, 08:42 PM
Compression Ignition Addict
 

Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 830
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Any lube can cause that to happen. Nuts and bolts are usually rated for torque values either with dry or lubricated threads. If you torque a bolt to the dry setting with oiled threads, it'll be a lot tighter, possibly damaging the fastener.

Found a good example of the differences. Note the "tight dry" and "torque lube": http://www.fandisc.com/tti.htm

Last edited by ttyR2; 05-17-2012 at 05:26 AM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #3  
Old 05-17-2012, 05:50 AM
Compression Ignition Addict
 

Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 4,974
Thanks: 2
Thanked 95 Times in 90 Posts
Feedback Score: 3 reviews
Quote:
Originally Posted by kep5niner View Post
I was having my tires balanced and rotated the other day at a national chain that I've done business with for many years, and the mechanic working on my truck made an interesting observation / correction. When I was pointing out to him the appropriate torque for the wheel lugs, he asked if I had anti-seize on the lug-nut studs. I told him yes, and experience over the past 20+ years has taught me that's the way to do it, or you're just begging to be on the side of the road somewhere with a flat (usually in the middle of winter), and you'll just be mf-ing the lug nuts because you won't be able to break them free.

The mechanic indicated that anti-seize does not allow the true torque to be achieved on the lug nuts, and in fact can produce an over-torque condition. I've never heard anything like that. Can anyone else chime in if there's any truth to that? Thanks guys.
I have this "Chap-Stick" like Anti Seize from LockTite I use on the studs anytime I take a tire off. Every vehicle and trailer I own. I have always done that, learned from the number of stuck lugnuts I've run across...

I think the number of corroded, smashed threaded, and mis-started studs Far out number the incidents of lugnuts that won't cooperate then Any danger of "over torquing" from the application of A/S. True torque values rely on pristine threads all around and that's just something you're not likely to find on the majority of lugs/studs.

I think the guys applying perfect world theory to a Real World situation and giving you poor advice
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #4  
Old 05-17-2012, 06:47 AM
Powerstroke.org Fanatic
 

Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 130
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoRalPh View Post
I have this "Chap-Stick" like Anti Seize from LockTite I use on the studs anytime I take a tire off. Every vehicle and trailer I own. I have always done that, learned from the number of stuck lugnuts I've run across...

I think the number of corroded, smashed threaded, and mis-started studs Far out number the incidents of lugnuts that won't cooperate then Any danger of "over torquing" from the application of A/S. True torque values rely on pristine threads all around and that's just something you're not likely to find on the majority of lugs/studs.

I think the guys applying perfect world theory to a Real World situation and giving you poor advice
Thanks, NoRalPh....that's kind of what I thought, too. Just wanted to make sure I didn't miss the memo.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #5  
Old 05-17-2012, 07:00 AM
Premium Member
 

Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Edmonton, Alberta Canada
Posts: 3,952
Thanks: 0
Thanked 33 Times in 31 Posts
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Interesting, as I've always used anti-seize lube on my wheel studs. All it took was one time on the side of the road jumping up and down on a four foot pin bar trying to get my lug nuts off to convince me to use something on the threads. As for breaking or damaging studs, the only time that has happened to me is with non-lubed studs. Perhaps it depends on the type of thread lube, IDK, but I use the same thread lube we use on pipe flange and exchanger bolts at work.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #6  
Old 05-17-2012, 11:40 AM
Compression Ignition Addict
 

Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 830
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
I too use anti-sieze on lug nuts and just make sure not to lay into them with a 1" impact wrench. They're fine. There's obviously a big safety margin on the strength of the bolts too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #7  
Old 05-18-2012, 12:23 PM
NOT a Democrat
 

Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Robinson Twp PA (Pittsburgh)
Posts: 4,511
Thanks: 2
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Send a message via AIM to Galaxie
I use it lightly. Also on the back of the wheel.


Sent from my iPhone using Autoguide
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #8  
Old 05-21-2012, 06:09 PM
Member
 

Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Vernon,NJ
Posts: 34
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Its never a good idea to use anti seize on anything holding your wheel on. Better to clean the threads up and maybe a little grease. I have seen an 8 lug wheel fall off from anti seize on the studs. clean and chase the threads

Sent from my DROID RAZR using AutoGuide.Com Free App
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #9  
Old 05-21-2012, 06:21 PM
Compression Ignition Addict
 

Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: New Martinsville, West Virginia
Posts: 2,547
Thanks: 0
Thanked 18 Times in 16 Posts
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Clean dry threads... if you are rotating your tires at normal intervals on a daily driver, this works fine, and the tork values are correct... but I generally, don't use anything.

My mud truck, which sits for months at a time, and might not have the wheels off in a year or two, I won't hesitate to use WD-40 before I take them off, and when I put them on, or even PB Blaster, or what ever is handy... or nothing... depends on what kinda mood I'm in at the time, and how easy they come off... having acorn (covered) lug nuts helps too... keeps the end of the stud from being exposed, and the threads getting rusty.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Ford Powerstroke Diesel Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 08:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1
Garage Plus, Vendor Tools vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.

vB.Sponsors