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  #1  
Old 12-08-2010, 08:32 PM
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Just got a AE now what?

Just got a AE scan tool,now I need an instruction manual or tips on how to use it,anyone???
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Old 12-08-2010, 09:05 PM
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Should just plug into your OBD port I believe.
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  #3  
Old 12-09-2010, 05:50 AM
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Congrats! You'll love finding all it can do.

Go here -> http://autoenginuity.com/AEForum/index.php

and start reading, there's a TON of information

Here's a basic overview of our engines -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Important AutoEnginuity USB Hardware Note

Unlike devices connected via Serial cables, USB devices are "Powered" by the PC they are connected to. Connecting an AutoEnginuity

USB ScanTool cable to a laptop computer that is being powered through the Cigarette Lighter/Power Port of the vehicle can cause ground

loops through the laptop. At the very least this will lead to problems establishing communications with the vehicle, in some cases this

can even damage the AutoEnginuity USB ScanTool hardware. This problem will occur whether using an inverter or powering directly off of

12v.

If you are using the AutoEnginuity USB ScanTool on a vehicle where the OBDII port and the Cigarette Lighter/Power Port share the

same fused circuit (Ford Super Duty for example), do NOT power the laptop from the power ports.

When you first launch the AutoEnginuity software there are some settings that need to be modified. The settings below are what we

recommend to get the best results when connecting to Powerstroke Diesel vehicles. Connection to other vehicles may require changes to

these settings. All of these settings are located in "Communications Configuration" on the "Vehicle" menu.

* Computer Interface:
o Select "Auto Detect Serial Port" ONLY if you are using a Serial version of the AutoEnginuity tool
o Select "USB or Manually Set Serial Port" for USB versions of the AutoEnginuity tool
o I prefer to turn off "Automatically Connect on Launch" so I can start the software without it trying to connect
* Vehicle Interface (these settings are for the BEST connectivity support for FORD POWERSTROKE DIESEL TRUCKS ONLY):
o "Vehicle Interface Type" should be "J1850PWM" for a 7.3L and "Auto-Detect" for a 6.0L
o "Initialization Type" should be "Non-OBDII" when connecting to a 7.3L
NOTE: The above settings will need to be changed to "Auto-Detect" and "OBDII Compliant" if connecting to a

non-Powerstroke vehicle
o "Use Fastmode CAN" and "Use Heartbeat" should not be selected when connecting to a Ford
* The above settings are automatically saved. You won't need to adjust these unless you change them to connect to a different

vehicle.

Cylinder Contribution Testing (7.3L)

AutoEnginuity can be used to execute Cylinder Contribution Tests (CCT) on 94-03 7.3L Powerstroke Diesel equipped vehicles (the 6.0L

PCM doesn't have this functionalilty built-in). A common cause of failed CCTs is "EOT out of Range"...which means Engine Oil

Temperature is out of range. The following approximate EOT values are required to execute a CCT:

* 94-97 Powerstroke Diesel: 170F+
* 99-03 Powerstroke Diesel: 135F+

Also, make sure that ALL accessories are turned off (A/C, etc.)

Note: on 94-97 Powerstroke Trucks, you may be able to audibly hear the test turning cylinders on and off (trucks with newer

calibrations should complete 3 test cycles). The test will be terminated early if a cylinder is found to be very bad. Once that

cylinder is repaired, the CCT will need to be run again to check the rest of the cylinders. You will not hear this on the 99-03

Powerstroke Trucks as the test is performed differently. There is also a potential problem with the CCT if it detects an issue with

either the #6 or #8 cylinder. Due to the fact that cylinders #6 and #8 fire in sequence and are physically adjacent to each other in

the engine, it is not uncommon for a CCT to mis-report a problem with one cylinder that actually exists in the other.

For 99-03 7.3L, another way to use AutoEnginuity to see if there are problems with a particular cylinder is to monitor the

"Cylinder x Change Rotational Vel" or "Percentage of Crank Deceleration" PID (also commonly called PERDEL). This PID exists for all 8

cylinders and is a representation of crankshaft velocity change (decrease) at the time the cylinder is firing. Ideally, these should

all read 0%. Any cylinder consistently reading more than 3-5% change in rotational velocity is suspect and should be further examined.

Note: Engine should be fully warmed up before checking PERDEL data.


The Injector "Buzz" Test can be used to look for a faulty fuel injector. It is best to run this test on a totally cold engine, one

that has sat overnight and has not been started.

Initiate the "Buzz" test and then listen carefully to the injectors as the test is completed. First, all 8 injectors will "Buzz" at

the same time. Then, the IDM will "Buzz" the injectors in numerical order (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8). Remember that cylinders 1-3-5-7 are

on the passenger side and 2-4-6-8 are on the drivers side, with cylinders 1 & 2 being at the front of the engine. You should hear a

strong "Buzz" bouncing from side to side for all 8 injectors. If one of the injectors doesn't "Buzz", you've found a problem cylinder.

It is important to note that when an injector fails to "Buzz" properly, you will still hear the other 7 injectors make a faint

buzz...this is a designed function to protect the IDM.

Note: Because the IDM will "buzz" the other 7 injectors faintly during individual cylinder tests, it is possible for the "Buzz"

test to report no problems detected. If the "Buzz" test reports no failures, but you don't hear a particular cylinder "Buzz"...more

than likely there is a problem with that injector.

It should also be noted that an injector failing a "Buzz" test can have many causes. The injector can be in a failed state (loose

armature plate screw, bad solenoid, etc.), the UCV (under valve cover) gasket or harness could be damaged or disconnected, the main

engine harness could be damaged or the IDM could be damaged. Further inspection will be necessary to determine the actual problem...but

at least you now have a place to start.

Quick KOEO Sensor Checks:

There are a few sensors that can be easily checked with a scantool. Starting with a "Dead Cold" engine (let it sit overnight, don't

start), connect to the truck with the ScanTool. Check the following:

1. Oil Temp should closely match the current Ambient Temp.
2. Readings for Exhaust Backpressure, Manifold Absolute Pressure and Barometric Pressure should all be within 1/2 psi of each

other (this should be true with the engine either warm or cold).
(Note: with the engine running, MAP and EBP values are "Pressure + Baro". For example, if Baro is 14.7 and there is 2psi of

boost, MAP will read 16.7. Also, there is a calculated PID called "Manifold Gauge Pressure" that doesn't have the Baro pressure added

in).

KOER (Key On Engine Running) On-Demand Test:

On the 7.3L, the primary purpose of this test is to check the functionalilty of the High Pressure Oil System and the Exhaust Back

Pressure Solenoid. On the 6.0L this test may return Misfire, VGT or Glowplug codes.

Requirements to Start
7.3L Powerstroke

Vehicle Power :10.5v


RPM Signal :100rpm

Inj. Cntrl Press. (ICP) :0.85v (about 500psi)

Fuel Pulse Width :1 to 6 milliseconds


Note: the above starting requirements for 7.3L Powerstroke Diesels assume the following:

* Sufficient Base Engine Oil Level and Pressure
* Acceptable Quality Fuel
* Sufficient Fuel Pressure
* Sufficient Air Supply
* Proper Glow Plug Operation
* Proper Injection Timing (PCM Controlled)

P1298 - "IDM Failure" (7.3L)

This code can be set by a low battery. Connect a battery charger, clear codes and re-run KOEO tests. If this code doesn't return,

check charging system and batteries and repair as necessary. If the code returns, IDM is suspect.

P1316 - "IDM Codes Detected" (7.3L)

IDM Codes are stored in memory in the IDM itself. The P1316 DTC is an indication that there are stored IDM Codes that need to be

retrieved and/or cleared. Executing a "Clear Codes" will clear both PCM and IDM codes...DO NOT CLEAR CODES until you have retrieved and

reviewed the codes stored in the IDM!

If you get a P1316 DTC, the following steps will allow you to view the stored codes in the IDM using AutoEnginuity:

1. Execute a KOEO (Key On Engine Off) Test.
2. Execute an Injector "Buzz" Test.
3. The displayed results from these tests will include any stored IDM Codes.

Please keep in mind that IDM Codes are stored in memory. If you have a code indicating a fault, but there is no drivability

problem, the fault may not currently exist. After taking note of the codes, execute a "Clear Codes". At this time you should be able to

re-run the above tests with no IDM codes generated. If one or more IDM codes are still present after the "Clear Codes" command has been

successfully executed and the above tests performed again, the fault still exists and further examination is necessary.

P1211 - "ICP Higher/Lower Than Desired" (7.3L)

We all know that this code is commonly caused by "Hot Chips" that are demanding more Injection Control Pressure (ICP) than the High

Pressure Oil Pump can deliver. For what it's worth, these are the exact parameters that trigger this code:

* ICP 410psi Higher Than Desired for 7 Seconds
* ICP 280psi Lower Than Desired for 7 Seconds

This code can also be caused by legitimate High Pressure Oil System issues. Below is a list of some of the causes:

* Failed or Sticking IPR (Injection Pressure Regulator)
* Failed or Weak HPOP (High Pressure Oil Pump)
* Any Leak in High Pressure Oil System (o-ring, stuck injector, etc.)
* Low Fuel Pressure (Rare)

P1280 / P1281 / P1283 - (7.3L)

The above codes are related to ICP also. If the Service Engine Soon (SES) light is on and these codes are present, the ICP reading

through any scantool will not be accurate as the PCM is using a "default" ICP value. These codes are all "electrical" in nature. Common

causes are shorts between the Red and White IPR wires or between the Red IPR wire and ground. These can also sometimes indicate a PCM

problem.


This is from a post by Mr. Hansen:

Set up AE to monitor ICP and IPR duty cycle and crank it over. When you first turn the key on, you should get 14% IPR, and when you

crank it, ICP should come up to 500 psi plus and IPR should be probably no higher than 25% or so. If IPR goes above 35% then you may

have Injector o-ring leakage. That would explain the long crank times. You may also want to check cranking RPM, which should be a

minimum of 100.

SPEED TRACER : ALL Copies of AutoEnginuity include the Speed Tracer product. However, please be aware that Speed Tracer doesn't work

properly on Diesel appliations due to the lack of several key OBD-II sensors used for the horsepower and torque calculations.

For 99-03 7.3L, another way to use AutoEnginuity to see if there are problems with a particular cylinder is to monitor the "Cylinder x

Change Rotational Vel" or "Percentage of Crank Deceleration" PID (also commonly called PERDEL). This PID exists for all 8 cylinders and

is a representation of crankshaft velocity change (decrease) at the time the cylinder is firing. Ideally, these should all read 0%. Any

cylinder consistently reading more than 3-5% change in rotational velocity is suspect and should be further examined. Note: Engine

should be fully warmed up before checking PERDEL data.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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  #4  
Old 12-09-2010, 07:19 AM
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WOW,That was a lot more info than i expected,THANKS! I hooked it up yesterday and played with it a little and got a p0476 code but thats all.
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