Benefits of CCV Mod on a turbo IDI? - Ford Powerstroke Diesel Forum
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  #1  
Old 12-26-2010, 06:19 PM
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Benefits of CCV Mod on a turbo IDI?

I'm a former 6.0 owner and I had the CCV mod done on my old truck. The CCV mod is popular with the 6.0's because the oily CCV mist gets oil in the intercooler and "intercooler pipe boots" causing them to pop off under load. I went ahead and did the CCV mod to my newly aquired turbo IDI 7.3 when checking the air filter. There was an oily film on the air intake tube and the turbo, and in my opinion the CCV mod allows cooler, cleaner air to get to the turbo. What I don't like is that the turbo IDI 7.3 puts out way more CCV fumes than the 6.0 did. If the truck is at a standstill it literally looks like something is burning or the engine is overheating because of the fumes! So I just want to know if there is any benefit to having the CCV mod done on a NON-INTERCOOLED engine such as the turbo 7.3 IDI?

Also, K&N air filters are frowned upon by the 6.0 guys what about turbo 7.3 IDI's?
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Old 12-26-2010, 06:43 PM
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not much, i honestly would leave it, it keeps a slight vacuum on the which prevents leaks.


K and nare also frowned upon on idi, and diesel engines in general, run one for a few hundred miles then wipe your finger on the inside of the intake, all that sh$% is going in your engine. You are better off going with a larger than stock air filter. since its a turbo, you probably can put the air filter used on the DIY that we use on the 7.3 powerstroke depending how big the compressor inlet is

Last edited by ryandamo; 12-26-2010 at 06:48 PM.
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  #3  
Old 12-26-2010, 07:20 PM
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I will be un-doing the mod tomorrow. What about other high flow air filters like airaid, etc?
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Old 12-26-2010, 09:16 PM
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I have a K&N on mine and I have had no issues.
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Old 12-27-2010, 08:42 AM
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I have been doing a lot of forum jumping and reading about the CCV oil problem in the cooler and I got my reason and solution for modification on the TDI VW forum.
In 2000 VW owners had discussion and modifications on this problem and it was explained.
Oil fumes in the CCV system are sucked in the turbo and on in the CAC cooler and in there it will be condensated due to cooling the air and it will stick in the passages and after time it will block passages. The oil collecting in the pipes is nothing compared to the oil condensing in the passages of the cooler.

The solution was to cool the flow of vapours before they get to the turbo, but not enough to freeze neither.

By rerouting it to a container/filter the vapours can be cooled and drip at the bottom in a container that may be dump at oil changes.
They found if cooling did not happen the oil mist in the fumes are hard to remove and filtering just plug and limit the fume flow.
They found out that VW had a CCV fume extractor that had fibre wool in it that was a heat transfer media instead of filtering.

I have tought about this problem and feel that I have come up with a fairly easy solution.
The fumes should be directed to a canister with an inlet at the middle but to the side to form a cyclonic air flow and outlet to the top center. The heavy oil will be directed along the container walls and the lighter air is discharged in the center. Then the canister has to be filled with cupper or aluminum wool to cool the air as it passes through the container.

There I have it solved and hope someone has success with it.
Will try to make one to install on mine.
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Old 12-27-2010, 08:44 AM
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CCV mod is a complete waste of time on any truck

As to the K&N on non turbocharged engines they work fine as long as they are properly oiled
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Old 12-27-2010, 09:18 AM
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Sorry my write up was for trucks with Turbos and CAC coolers


I did install a K & N filter on my 6.2L non turbo GM in 95 after I got tired of changing the air filters in order to pull my RV. I installed it after the improved exhaust and found a world of difference with the pulling power. Much improved compared to the exhaust modification. and I did 60Miles on the original without oiling. The dust in the filter is an improvement in filtering and did not block air flow.

I had a 4 speed standard and slowed down to 40 MPH in a long hill while traveling south.
With the exhaust improvement it was 45MPH at the same hill and it was 55 MPH with the K & N filter.

I did the trip 3 times and each time I averaged 18MPG and there was never any changes in MPG with the changes of Exhaust or Filter.

Last edited by caissiel; 12-27-2010 at 09:21 AM.
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Old 12-27-2010, 02:16 PM
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There is a lot of bad info floating around in this thread. I also don't feel it is a waist of time or money either. I actually think every Powerstroke should perform the CCV mod. , not so I can benifit in any way, but because I feel it is a worth while mod to perform. But let's be honest here, this mod will not gain mpg, will not add any horsepower, and it does nothing to lower EGT, or increase boost pressure. Yes I have read all of the above on different forums, including this one. By dumping the oily vapors into the intake it creates a problem when the boots get saturated in oil they can be difficult to keep in place especially on vehicles with higher boost numbers. The main reason I would recommend the CCV mod is simply a maintenace issue. The oil saturates the boots and they begin to drip into the valley and eventually down the back of the block making you think you have a rear main seal going South. Not to mention all the crap that sticks to the oil saturated boots. I have had my CCV Mod on my truck since 2003 and I have never once removed my boots for any cleaning at all. Many on this forum have seen my engine compartment and can testify that by boots still look brand new. I believe I have photos in my webshots album linked to in my sig. On powerstrokes that have higher mileage on them this oil will usually collect in the bottom of the IC. The IC is there to cool air not collect oil. All in all I believe keeping this oil out of my intercooler is a mod well worth doing. But I am not going to lie to anyone about any further benifits of doing this mod. Not everyone is as anal about their engine as I am. If you have ever had a intercooler boot blow at higher boost levels, I am sure you would agree with me that you don't want to have it happen again.
Let me also say that there are several ways of doing the CCV mod. Some good and some not so good. I have seen many that try welding a bung onto the exhaust and running the oil vapors to this bung where they can be burnt up by the hot exhaust gasses. This sounds great in theory, but the truth is that if the bung isn't welded at the exact angle and at the specific point in the exhaust it will actually cause back pressure on the crank case. The powerstroke is very sensitive to back pressure. So this is never recommended. Other will just vent a hose to atmosphere. This will drip oil on your driveway, all over the underside of your truck, plus it stinks bad and in the winter people will tell you that your truck is on fire. Not to mention it is technically illegal according to the emission laws. This may nmot affect your state now, but trust me it's coming. Just watch CA as it will usually start there and spread like the flu. A much better way is to not change the flow of air into the intake but to reroute this air, send it through a collection canister where the oil clings to a filter media, and what returns to the intake is clean air, free of oil. If this mod was really not worth doing I doubt I would have sold as many as I have. But I do agree with Dave that there is a lot of bad information out there as far as this mod is concerned, hopefully I have put a rest to much of this in this thread. If anyone has any further questions you can PM me and I will try and answer each one.
Take Care
NCH
CCV Mod
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  #9  
Old 12-28-2010, 03:20 PM
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he is not talking about a powerstroke, he is talking about an IDI, which comes with a crankcase depression relief valve to keep a slight vacuum on the motor. Unlike powerstrokes, which have superior sealing, the 7.3 and 6.9 motor WILL leak without the valve in place. some Powerstroke owners install a road draft tube , but when it comes to an idi, it is a completely different engine than a powerstroke.
Also IDI's have no intercoolers to collect oil, and only see between high teen boost numbers at the very max if they are even equipped with a turbo so boots slipping are not an issue

Last edited by ryandamo; 12-28-2010 at 05:57 PM.
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  #10  
Old 12-28-2010, 03:41 PM
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I have un-done my CCV mod, no more smoke show.
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