Engine block heater plug seems to spark when plugging in extension cord - Ford Powerstroke Diesel Forum
6.7 Problems Forum 6.7 Problems Forum

Powerstroke.org is the premier Diesel Truck Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-24-2013, 01:25 PM
Powerstroke.org Fanatic
 

Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 106
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Engine block heater plug seems to spark when plugging in extension cord

Hello,
So it's finally getting cold here in Wisconsin and decided to plug in the block heater yesterday night. When I plugged in the cord it seemed to make that "sparking" type sound. Didn't see a spark but quickly unplugged it and tried again. Same thing. I unplugged the cord and the extension cord did have a burning sensation, but the plug on the truck i couldn't smell anything. Decided to try and look it over today. Tried a different extension cord and had the same result. Looked over the wiring and nothing seems cut. I did do a resistance test on the 3 wires that go into the plug on the truck and it seems i have 15 ohms resistance between the common and the neutral wire.
After doing some research it appears that should be normal. Can someone please do a Resistance test between those two wires on their factory plug and let me know if they have that as well?

Hopefully their isn't a wiring problem on it. I'm scared to keep it plugged in. I'm not sure if it'll start a fire or if it could be just because the block heater is getting energized and it's doing that just because it hasn't been used for a long time.

Only major thing that was done since the last time i used the block heater was a full EGR delete. I'm not sure if that has something to do with it or not, but i do believe that the block heater warms the coolant, and not the block. Anyone with the full EGR delete using their block heater and it's working successfully??

Last edited by theinfamouskonrad; 11-24-2013 at 02:44 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2  
Old 11-25-2013, 10:46 AM
Member
 

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Posts: 60
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Send a message via MSN to Lococoin
It just sparked when you first plugged it in and then it stopped? If so that is perfectly normal. The block heater draws a lot of amperage so you will get sparking when u plug it in / out.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #3  
Old 11-25-2013, 01:16 PM
Powerstroke.org Rookie
 

Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 18
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Yep...it's normal
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #4  
Old 11-25-2013, 05:31 PM
Powerstroke.org Fanatic
 

Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 106
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Ended up buying a new extension cord. Plugged that in, also into another outlet and it sparked once again, but this time I didn't smell the burning sensation like the other plug. So I ended up leaving it plugged in for a bit and it seemed to work. Guess it is normal for that spark to happen. Better safe then sorry asking though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #5  
Old 11-25-2013, 05:52 PM
Premium Member
 

Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: 804Va
Posts: 2,688
Thanks: 651
Thanked 117 Times in 97 Posts
Feedback Score: 3 reviews
based on your post I'm sure you know this but make sure you have a decent gauge cord, not your old ladies extension for her candle warmers.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #6  
Old 11-25-2013, 06:11 PM
Powerstroke.org Fanatic
 

Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 106
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Yea I know. Book calls for a minimum of 16 gauge. I went with a 14 gauge all weather one to be safe. Shorter the cord the better.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #7  
Old 11-30-2013, 01:08 PM
Compression Ignition Addict
 

Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 247
Thanks: 2
Thanked 18 Times in 14 Posts
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
What you are experiencing sounds normal. Think of the arc that is created when you screw in a light bulb when the power is on, only the block heater will draw a much larger load and thus a larger arc. Hope this helps.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #8  
Old 11-30-2013, 01:11 PM
Compression Ignition Addict
 

Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 8,136
Thanks: 64
Thanked 183 Times in 174 Posts
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sterling6.7 View Post
What you are experiencing sounds normal. Think of the arc that is created when you screw in a light bulb when the power is on, only the block heater will draw a much larger load and thus a larger arc. Hope this helps.
this would be about a thousand watt light bulb
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #9  
Old 12-13-2013, 04:31 AM
Compression Ignition Addict
 

Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 340
Thanks: 1
Thanked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Just make sure that you seat the plug fully and QUICKLY. if you slow push it, as the plug get close to the contacts they will make make the jump. Its normal...so just push fast!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #10  
Old 12-13-2013, 05:09 AM
Compression Ignition Addict
 

Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Centerport, PA
Posts: 255
Thanks: 5
Thanked 17 Times in 14 Posts
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
You could use a power strip or similar at the wall outlet. Turn off the strip while you plug into (or unplug from) the truck, then flip the switch on the power strip. No more sparking.

If this is a ground fault circuit (which I would suggest since you're running a cord outdoors), this will give you two benefits.
#1 - Sparking may trip the ground fault interrupter and you might not realize it.
#2 - If you use a power strip with a lighted switch, you would easily be able to see that the power in on and be sure that the circuit, or GF, is not tripped

Personally, I use a timer that has a built-in manual on/off switch that serves this purpose. Then I only have to pay to run the heater for a couple hours before I leave for work. The down side is that if I need to leave other than the morning, I need to plan ahead and manually switch on a couple hours early, but it's help on the electric bill.

Last edited by ynpmoose; 12-13-2013 at 05:15 AM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Ford Powerstroke Diesel Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 05:39 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1
Garage Plus, Vendor Tools vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.

vB.Sponsors