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  #1  
Old 08-15-2013, 03:34 PM
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Cetane booster?

This may seem like a really dumb question but I'm not qualified to know the difference.

A guy told me today at a truck meet. That if you add two bottles of cetane booster to the tank before a dyno run it will be like a gasoline engine running on race fuel. Is this true? Does cetane with diesels work like octane in gasolines?
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Old 08-15-2013, 04:14 PM
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Here's an explanation from the website: "Fuel Magic" ( I'm not promoting Fuel Magic....never heard of it or used it....just thought they had some good info.)


"How Does Cetane Number Affect Engine Operation

There is no benefit to using a higher cetane number fuel than is specified by the engine's manufacturer. The ASTN Standard Specification for Diesel Fuel Oils (D-975) states. "The cetane number requirements depend on engine design, size, nature of speed and load variations, and on starting and atmospheric conditions. Increase in cetane number over values actually required does not materially improve engine performance. Accordingly, the cetane number specified should be as low as possible to insure maximum fuel availability." This quote underscores the importance of matching engine cetane requirements with fuel cetane number.

Diesel fuels with cetane number lower than minimum engine requirements can cause rough engine operation. They are more difficult to start, expecially in cold weather or at high altitudes. They accelerate lube oil sludge formation. Many low cetane fuels increase engine deposits resulting in more smoke, increased exhaust emissions and greater engine wear.

Using fuels which meet engine operating requirements will improve cold starting, reduce smoke during start-up, improve fuel economy, reduce exhaust emissions, improve engine durability and reduce noise and vibration. These engine fuel requirements are published in the operating manual for each specific engine or vehicle.

Overall fuel quality and performance depend on the ratio of parafinic and aromatic hydrocarbons, the presence of sulfur, water, bacteria and other contaminants, and the fuel's resistance to oxidation. The most important measure of fuel quality included API gravity, heat value (BTU content), distillation range and viscosity. Cleanliness and corrosion resistance are also important. For use in cold weather, cloud point and low temperature filter plugging point must receive serious consideration. Cetane number does not measure any of these characteristics.


Cetane Improvers / Ignition Accelerators

U.S. diesel fuels are blends of distillate fuels and cracked petroleum hydrocarbons. The cracked hydrocarbons are low cetane compounds, largely due to their aromatic content. To meet the cetane number demands of most diesel engines, cetane improvers must be added to these blends. The lower cetane cracked compounds are less responsive to these cetane improvers than the higher cetane paraffinic fuels.

Cetane improvers modify combustion in the engine. They encourage early and uniform ignition of the fuel. They discourage premature combustion and excessive rate of pressure increase in the combustion cycle. Depending on the amount of high versus low cetane components in the base fuel, typically alkyl nitrate additive treatments can increase cetane by about 3 to 5 numbers (1:1000 treatment ratio). With high natural cetane premium base buels (containing a high percentage of parafins) and a 1:500 treatment ratio, cetane may increase up to a maximum of about 7 numbers.

Most cetane improvers contain alkyl nitrates which break down readily to provide additional oxygen for better combustion. They also break down and oxidize fuel in storage. This generates organic particulates, water, and sludge - all of which degrade fuel quality. The result is often a fuel which no longer meets even minimum requirements. (*Because of these drawbacks, nitrate cetane improvers are not used in Fuel Magic.)

Fuel Magic is blended to improve oxidation stability while providing a cetane number increase of 2 to 3 numbers. Fuel Magic improves combustion while reducing oxidation and particulate formation, increasing storage stability, and enhancing fuel quality.


Do Cetane Improving Additives Really Improve Fuel Quality?

Fuel quality is defined by the physical property specifications given in the ASTM Standard Specification for Diesel Fuel Oils, ASTM D-975. Carbon residue, ash and sulfur increase engine wear and deposit formation. Premium diesel fuels should have lower specifications for these properties. Additionally, premium diesel fuels should be more stable in storage than standard fuels, so the premium fuel quality you purchase won't degrade over time. This is the area where nitrate-containing cetane improvers cause problems. (*Fuel Magic contains no alkyl nitrates.)

More fuel retailers are introducing premium diesel fuels, touting high cetane number as the sole benchmark of fuel quality. Contrary to this assumption, a cetane number which is too high may cause too short an ignition delay period. This changes the timing of the pressure peak, resulting in loss of power. When this happens, many of the performance problems associated with low cetane fuel will result. While the problems due to low cetane largely disappear after the engine warms up, with too high a cetane, these problems will persist even with a hot engine."




So according to the information from the above website......Too high a cetane level will ultimately cause you to lose power.

I've found that using my additives according to the manufacturers directions, IMHO, helps my diesel run smoother...I seem to have faster starts ( especially with cold weather ) and I think it might, might help my fuel economy. Ultimately I use it for starting and lubricity.

Wayne

I'm not sure we have an equivalent of NitroMethane....to run in our engines. Add propane and / or nitrous to your good diesel fuel and you'll see a difference.

Last edited by Senderofan; 08-15-2013 at 04:19 PM.
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Old 10-03-2013, 12:58 PM
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Cetane Improver

The answer to your question is yes Cetane is to diesel fuel as octane is to gasoline. The higher the Cetane Number the shorter the delay time so you will have quicker starting, quieter idling and yes increased Horsepower and less smoke and reduced particulate deposits. Caution, if you are adding straight Cetane Improver you will hurt the lubricity.
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Old 10-03-2013, 01:47 PM
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I'd sure like to see some dyno numbers to prove this.
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Old 10-03-2013, 05:05 PM
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im pretty sure cetane it like the opposite of octane.
the higher the cetane of diesel the sooner it ignites under pressure, the higher the octane of gas the more resistant it is to ignite under pressure.

But most people believe that higher octane is higher quality cleaner burning fuel.
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Old 10-04-2013, 05:46 AM
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Attached Dyno Test
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Dyno Test of TDR-S.pdf (93.9 KB, 135 views)
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  #7  
Old 10-04-2013, 11:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rwalker View Post
Attached Dyno Test
Well there ya go. I'd of never thought it would make a bit of difference in power.
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