Pyro install - Ford Powerstroke Diesel Forum
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  #1  
Old 08-04-2007, 11:12 AM
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Question Pyro install

The older SD's were easy - one blower - but where should a pyro be installed on the 6.4 twin? My DRW CC is okay stock, but isn't the powerhouse I expected. If history has shown anything it's been obvious that programmers typically add mileage, and this beast need all the help it can get in that department!
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Old 08-04-2007, 11:16 AM
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my personal opinion would be the manifold before the first turbo. If I am correct the two turbos are hooked in line, as in one powers the other. If that is correct then my idea of where to put the pyro is correct. You would want it on the manifold before the first turbo. Because the second turbo should be running cooler then the first one.

Maybe Marc or Scuffy, Of StrokeTech can give you a better Idea then my guessing.
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Old 08-05-2007, 01:57 AM
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i would do it on the down pipe right after it connects to the turbo.
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Old 08-05-2007, 08:02 AM
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If it's post turbo the reading is a little bit lower but still just as good of a reference as the differential will be the same at any temperature. When it comes apart you won't need to buy new turbo's.

Put a heat gun on the different places to see what you get.

Last edited by DavidPhillips; 08-05-2007 at 08:05 AM.
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Old 08-05-2007, 11:58 AM
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i have an egt installed pre and post turbo i only get like 75 deg diff between them sometimes only 50 deg diff depending on temp out side.
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Old 09-20-2007, 09:02 AM
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The thermo-coupler for the pyrometer should always be installed AFTER the turbo, David Phillips is right on with this information. When the thermo-coupler tip burns off (and they do-we own a fleet of Kenworths-speaking from experience) it will not take your turbo(s) with it.
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Old 09-20-2007, 09:16 AM
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Post turbo can really be way off... Ditty's is.

Do it right the first time, pre turbo.
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Old 09-20-2007, 02:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spburns View Post
The older SD's were easy - one blower - but where should a pyro be installed on the 6.4 twin? My DRW CC is okay stock, but isn't the powerhouse I expected. If history has shown anything it's been obvious that programmers typically add mileage, and this beast need all the help it can get in that department!
The pyro should always be installed pre turbo. The reason behind this is that the turbo will absorb a lot of the heat resulting in you getting a false reading. I call it a false reading because the temperatures the engine sees will be much hotter that what reachs a pyro post turbo. I know people say that a post turbo pryo can still be used as a gauge for heat, but that isn't totally accurate. Depending on how hard you're spinning the turbo the percentage of heat absorbed will constantly change, again giving you a false reading.
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Old 09-21-2007, 04:51 AM
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On my last truck, I had both pre and post turbo installations, so I think I can answer this question with FACTS.

The post turbo reading can be as much as 500 degrees off under full throttle.
The post unit was about as useless and inaccurate as it can get.
While under consistant speed and throttle, the post temps were usually 200 degrees behind, but it does not reflect that difference under throttle spikes.

As far as burning off, maybe a big rig with a few hundred thousand miles may experience probe failure with a stainless unit, I doubt that any pick up truck will have the same hard use. There are inconel alloy probes available which will hold up many times better than stainless, and stainless is pretty darn good!
Personally, I've never had a problem..
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Old 09-24-2007, 06:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by George C View Post
On my last truck, I had both pre and post turbo installations, so I think I can answer this question with FACTS.

The post turbo reading can be as much as 500 degrees off under full throttle.
The post unit was about as useless and inaccurate as it can get.
While under consistant speed and throttle, the post temps were usually 200 degrees behind, but it does not reflect that difference under throttle spikes.

As far as burning off, maybe a big rig with a few hundred thousand miles may experience probe failure with a stainless unit, I doubt that any pick up truck will have the same hard use. There are inconel alloy probes available which will hold up many times better than stainless, and stainless is pretty darn good!
Personally, I've never had a problem..

perfectly stated couldn't agree more !!!
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