How to install a Power inverter. (Walk-Through with Pics) - Ford Powerstroke Diesel Forum
6.4 Electronics Discussion TV's, Radios, everything electric and NON-Performance.

Powerstroke.org is the premier Diesel Truck Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-11-2012, 10:06 AM
Error 404: Page Not Found
 

Join Date: May 2012
Location: Akron, OH
Posts: 91
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Post How to install a 110v Power Inverter. (Walk-Through with Pics)

So I have been wanting to put my power inverter in my truck since I got it. I have had this inverter for about 6 years and it's been in 3 different trucks. I used to just clip it onto the battery, run the cable, and then set it on the floor between the driver and passenger in the front for easy access. I never had it hooked up to a switch of fuse, I just used the switch on the side of the inverter itself. Now that I don't drive a beater work truck anymore though, I wanted to have the floor empty up front which meant hiding the inverter somewhere. Because of the fold out work tray under the back seat, and the power seats up front, my only easy option was behind the back seat. Here are some photos of the entire process in a step by step pictorial.

I HAVE NOT FINISHED THIS YET! I will hopefully be finishing this up tomorrow evening and I will update this thread with the final few pictures and steps.

Step 1: Parts Needed.

Parts list:
- 1 Inverter
- 1 Fuse (Read what size fuse you need in the power consumption on the inverter. I got my 70amp one off ebay for under $10.)
- 2 alligator clips (1 red and 1 black.)
- 40ft of wire. (20ft of red and 20ft of black)

Optional Items:
- 1 Relay (For remote power switch. Again, read the inverter for AMP requirements. You can get these on ebay I'm sure. I got mine from a local electronics shop.)
- 1 Switch (I used an up-fitter switch)
- 1 Extension cord (So you dont have to move the seat forward to plug things in.)











You need a Inverter. This one is a 700w inverter that draws 12.5v at 67.5 amps.
















My Fuse and Relay are hence rated for 70amps and I used 20ft of 10gauge wire with alligator clips to attach it to the battery. (Over kill on how much wire needed, but I wanted to be able to pull the inverter out from behind the seat and still leave it hooked up. I actually had some wire to spare and trimmed it shorter than 20ft. You probably only really need about 16ft.)

















Step 2: Running the wires.

I attached and then soldered the alligator clips to the wire before I started the project, but it can be done later. I just did it before hand so I wouldn't have to solder in the sun. (It was a warm one today.) I ran the wires this way in the past 3 trucks I had and have never had an issue. I replaced the old wire with new identical wire this time around only because the old ones weren't long enough. I ran them up the side of the front fender under the hood. Behind the weather stripping and behind the side panel that you see when you open the door. I placed a zip tie there to hold it in place. This is also where I am putting the relay and fuse for the inverter. After I made sure to leave myself a small loop of positive red wire to tap into later, I continued to run the line behind the plastic molding down the side column and then under the plastic door jam panels. There was actually already a wire chase here so I ran them through the chase. Then I just continued running them towards the back of the truck until I got them behind the back seat where the inverter was.





















Step 3: Hook up wires to the Inverter.

I used some Yellow 10-12 looped ends to attach the wire to the inverter. Then I plugged in a grounded 3 outlet 15ft extension cord so I could plug things in without pulling forward the back of the seat. Then I just set it down in the hole.
















Step 4: Hooking in the Fuse.

Coming Soon!

Optional Steps:
At this point it is working and fused. I wanted it to be usable remotely so I used a relay and one of my up-fitter switches, to control the power to the Inverter. These are optional steps.


Step 5: Hooking in the Relay.

Coming Soon!

Step 6: Using the up-fitter switch to Control the relay.

Coming Soon!

Last edited by SWhetsel; 07-14-2012 at 07:57 AM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2  
Old 07-11-2012, 10:07 AM
Error 404: Page Not Found
 

Join Date: May 2012
Location: Akron, OH
Posts: 91
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
And just in case I need it...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #3  
Old 07-13-2012, 09:58 AM
Compression Ignition Addict
 

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: KINGSLAND
Posts: 1,318
Thanks: 7
Thanked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Nice work... Except for the soldering! OMG!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #4  
Old 07-13-2012, 11:53 AM
Compression Ignition Addict
 

Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 488
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Ruff, not EVERYONE has spend six years doing nothing besides teaching people how to solder. I say the bigger the blob, the better the job.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #5  
Old 07-13-2012, 12:29 PM
Air Assault!!
 

Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Tampa Bay, FL.
Posts: 674
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 1 Post
Feedback Score: 2 reviews
Send a message via AIM to MPTonyT
I see a few issues with this....

Power wire should be run through the fire wall not through the door opening.

Wire size should be a minimum of 8AWG wire to support 67.5 Amps.

Fuse or circuit breaker should be within 18 inches of the battery.

I honestly hope you have insurance on your vehicle cause that's a fire hazard waiting to happen.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #6  
Old 07-13-2012, 12:37 PM
Compression Ignition Addict
 

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: KINGSLAND
Posts: 1,318
Thanks: 7
Thanked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Quote:
Originally Posted by Antonm View Post
Ruff, not EVERYONE has spend six years doing nothing besides teaching people how to solder. I say the bigger the blob, the better the job.
Nothing but? I object!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #7  
Old 07-14-2012, 07:53 AM
Error 404: Page Not Found
 

Join Date: May 2012
Location: Akron, OH
Posts: 91
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Quote:
Originally Posted by MPTonyT View Post
I see a few issues with this....

Power wire should be run through the fire wall not through the door opening.

Wire size should be a minimum of 8AWG wire to support 67.5 Amps.

Fuse or circuit breaker should be within 18 inches of the battery.

I honestly hope you have insurance on your vehicle cause that's a fire hazard waiting to happen.
Thanks for the advise.
I of course have insurance, but I disagree that it's a fire hazard.
I mean nothing that follows as snarky, but...

First, where did you come up with the 18 inch from the battery info? (Curious because I will move the fuse closer with that info.)

Second, I went off this chart, ( Wire Gauge Amps Ratings for 12 volt Automotive Systems ) for my selection of 10 gauge wire. I am at under 20 feet in wire and under full load I would pull 67 amps but realistically I wont ever pull more than 20 amps. ( Stuff I use rounded up in Amps: Flat panel 27" TV @ 6 amps, XBox @ 3 amps, Laptop Charger @ 2 amps ) I feel 10 gauge wire is beyond adequate.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #8  
Old 07-14-2012, 07:54 AM
Error 404: Page Not Found
 

Join Date: May 2012
Location: Akron, OH
Posts: 91
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Quote:
Originally Posted by RUFFSTUFF View Post
Nice work... Except for the soldering! OMG!
Haha, yeah I know it's not the best. I blame it partly on a bad soldering gun that I took back after it wouldnt even melt the solder. But I'm sure that its mostly horrid because I just am not practiced with it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #9  
Old 07-14-2012, 09:50 AM
Compression Ignition Addict
 

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: KINGSLAND
Posts: 1,318
Thanks: 7
Thanked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Ok, I was going to keep my mouth shut but... Yeah right.

Your inverter is designed to output 750W AC but it is not very efficient. In order to get your 750W, it's going to draw >60A DC. You might think your loads are small but using your figures as an example: Your XBox? Over 300W. Your TV? over 600W. Your laptop charger? Over 200W. In case you didn't know, Power (W) = Volts (E) x Current (I) therefore, in your XBox's case, 3A x 115VAC = 345W. Now look again at your made in China inverter label. Notice what they did? They give you DC input ratings and then the AC output ratings but they changed the rated items. 12.5VDC, 67.5A? Just over 840W. 750W, 120VAC? A whopping 6.25A! So it's going to draw 67.5A, but in the process of converting the DC to AC, it's going to consume over 60A to output 6.25A!!! This relates back to my first sentence in this paragraph.

A 750W inverter is not very large BTW. The rating is very deceiving.

So your postulated 20A draw is quite underrated, and at 10AWG, your wire capacity under best conditions is about 30A. The issue with your wire is that wire has resistance and larger wire (lower AWG number) has lower resistance than smaller wire (higher AWG number). Your 10AWG wire has about 0.001 ohms of resistance per foot, so 20 feet = 0.020 ohms. The power equation for this would be I^2(R). So at 30A, that would be 30(30)(0.020) = 18W. At 67.5A, that would be 67.5(67.5)(0.020) = 91.13W. This 18W or 91.13W of power is lost as heat which can melt your insulation and cause a very bad day (aka fire). Change to 8AWG wire and the resistance drops to 0.0006/ft, 0.012 for 20ft, and 10.8W/54.7W respectively. Quite an improvement.

Back to the fire, I say fire because if the insulation breakdown occurs between your protective device (fuse) and the battery, there is no means to protect you from the large electrical transient, therefore it could cause a fire or damage equipment. This is where the 18 inches comes in. (That's what she said.) 18 inches is the industry standard for just this reason. The protective device should always be as close as possible to the power source, i.e. 6 inches is better than 18 inches. (She didn't say that.)

I won't tell you my background because Antonm is a big meany and will make fun of me.

Last edited by RUFFSTUFF; 07-14-2012 at 09:55 AM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #10  
Old 07-14-2012, 10:12 AM
Error 404: Page Not Found
 

Join Date: May 2012
Location: Akron, OH
Posts: 91
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Quote:
Originally Posted by RUFFSTUFF View Post
Ok, I was going to keep my mouth shut but... Yeah right.

Your inverter is designed to output 750W AC but it is not very efficient. In order to get your 750W, it's going to draw >60A DC. You might think your loads are small but using your figures as an example: Your XBox? Over 300W. Your TV? over 600W. Your laptop charger? Over 200W. In case you didn't know, Power (W) = Volts (E) x Current (I) therefore, in your XBox's case, 3A x 115VAC = 345W. Now look again at your made in China inverter label. Notice what they did? They give you DC input ratings and then the AC output ratings but they changed the rated items. 12.5VDC, 67.5A? Just over 840W. 750W, 120VAC? A whopping 6.25A! So it's going to draw 67.5A, but in the process of converting the DC to AC, it's going to consume over 60A to output 6.25A!!! This relates back to my first sentence in this paragraph.

A 750W inverter is not very large BTW. The rating is very deceiving.

So your postulated 20A draw is quite underrated, and at 10AWG, your wire capacity under best conditions is about 30A. The issue with your wire is that wire has resistance and larger wire (lower AWG number) has lower resistance than smaller wire (higher AWG number). Your 10AWG wire has about 0.001 ohms of resistance per foot, so 20 feet = 0.020 ohms. The power equation for this would be I^2(R). So at 30A, that would be 30(30)(0.020) = 18W. At 67.5A, that would be 67.5(67.5)(0.020) = 91.13W. This 18W or 91.13W of power is lost as heat which can melt your insulation and cause a very bad day (aka fire). Change to 8AWG wire and the resistance drops to 0.0006/ft, 0.012 for 20ft, and 10.8W/54.7W respectively. Quite an improvement.

Back to the fire, I say fire because if the insulation breakdown occurs between your protective device (fuse) and the battery, there is no means to protect you from the large electrical transient, therefore it could cause a fire or damage equipment. This is where the 18 inches comes in. (That's what she said.) 18 inches is the industry standard for just this reason. The protective device should always be as close as possible to the power source, i.e. 6 inches is better than 18 inches. (She didn't say that.)

I won't tell you my background because Antonm is a big meany and will make fun of me.
Thank you for the detailed response!

I am well aware that the 6 year old China inverter is nothing special. But as it seems to power everything that I need it too, I wont be buying a new one! lol
(BTW, it says on it that it only outputs 6 amps A/C under the 750 label.) Those things that I listed are just a sample list of what I have and will run. Not what gets run all at the same time.

Armed with your explanation, I will be placing the fuse under the hood and as close to the battery as possible now.

PS. If I were to purchase a new inverter is there a specific one that you would recommend? Perhaps you know of one that is more efficient? Obviously a bigger inverter will require larger wire, but what size inverter would you run as a minimum?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Ford Powerstroke Diesel Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 05:52 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1
Garage Plus, Vendor Tools vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.

vB.Sponsors