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  #1  
Old 06-16-2013, 05:26 PM
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when to install coolant filter?

Hello again guys and gals,
Like the title says when is the best time to install a coolant filter? before, during, or after a coolant flush The other day I looked in my degas bottle and saw some particles at the bottom of the container. I would like to use the performance machine & MFG system so I don't have to splice any hoses. I will be doing a coolant flush whenever I get some spare time and was wondering if I should wait until I order a coolant filter to do the flush. My thoughts are that if I install the filter before the flush, the particles will end up being caught in the filter rather than being drained out of the drain plug and being completely removed form the cooling system.
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Old 06-16-2013, 05:34 PM
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As soon as possible. Here's something to consider. Your coolant filter is most likely a bypass filter which means it's not filtering 100% of the coolant 100% of the time. If you do a chemical flush and you break up the crud inside that cooler, there's a better chance of it settling every time you shut that truck off than it does getting picked up from the filter in a timely manner. What that means is if you install a new cooler for whatever reason, it will make a home in the new cooler before it gets caught in the system. If you have the filter, install it asap so it can start doing its job.

Just remember though, those filters are bypass filters so it takes a long time before the entire system has been filtered completely.
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Old 06-16-2013, 05:36 PM
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I built my own vs. going with Performance Machine, or Sinister, for 1/2 the price. No offence to either company.
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Old 06-16-2013, 05:42 PM
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I'm curious how you figure you won't be splicing any hoses either?? The only kit on the market I'm aware of that doesn't require splicing is IPR's coolant filter coupled with their coolant manifold.
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Old 06-16-2013, 07:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onebadcoastie View Post
I'm curious how you figure you won't be splicing any hoses either?? The only kit on the market I'm aware of that doesn't require splicing is IPR's coolant filter coupled with their coolant manifold.
I read this thread that says that I don't have to splice any hoses. 6.0L PowerStroke Coolant Filtration Kit PRE-ORDER SPECIAL!! Instead of splicing the radiator overflow hose it looks like I just install a new one that comes in the kit. As for the T connection I am not sure about how that gets connected. I don't have the kit yet but I think that is the one that I want.
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Old 06-16-2013, 07:10 PM
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You still have to cut the hose that goes from the water pump to the heater valve, install the tee that comes with the kit and route that to the filter. Either way, like I said, without getting the IPR kit with the manifold, you're going to be splicing.

Post #18 of that thread they indicate thread tape or sealant is not required on NPT threads...but that they are using it as insurance. That's the silliest crock of garbage I've heard all day. I would say 99.9999999999% of all NPT threads require tape or sealing compound of some sort. There's a reason it's sold in the plumbing sections of all hardware stores and that reason isn't...."for insurance". Personally I'd be leery of purchasing from them.

Take a look at the powerstroke threads about these guys in the following link. Consider yourself warned.

Performance Machine Manufacturing Reviews

Some more good info. Noticed what's highlighted in red bold letters:

"Sometimes NPT threads are referred to as MPT ('Male Pipe Thread'), MNPT, or NPT(M) for male (external) threads; and FPT ('Female Pipe Thread'), FNPT. An equivalent designation is MIP (Male iron pipe) and FIP (Female iron pipe). Also the terms NPS and NPSM are sometimes used to designate a straight, not tapered, thread. This should not be confused with NPS, meaning Nominal Pipe Size.[citation needed]
NPTF is pipe thread "fuel" often used in hydraulics. A taper is cut on the id of male pipe to accommodate metal to metal seals using swivels. NPSH is straight thread using the same pitch, thus NPSH female fittings are often used on NPT male fittings to have hand tight gasket sealed fittings to adapt to other thread types. A good example is adapting to NST for fire service.[citation needed]
Sometimes these terms are used:[citation needed]
MIP: stands for Male Iron Pipe, or Male International Pipe, or MPT Male Pipe Thread. It is a term for pipe fittings.[citation needed]
FIP: stands for Female Iron Pipe, or Female International Pipe, or FPT. It is a term for pipe fittings that MIP fittings fit into.[citation needed]
The difference between FIP, MIP, and Compression fittings is in the tapering of the thread. FIP has taper of 1:16 (6.25% slope), compression has taper of 13:96 (13.5% slope).[citation needed]
A female iron connection has a tapered thread, which thins out to the end of the pipe. As the fitting is tightened, the ever-decreasing thread depth means that the connection becomes watertight. To properly seal the fitting, paste thread sealant or PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) tape more commonly called Teflon tape, wrapped around the thread is required."

Now, one could argue I made all that up, or they could google "NPT thread tape" and read the wiki version which is verbatim. Again, I'd be leery of a company who has no idea what they're talking about.

Last edited by onebadcoastie; 06-16-2013 at 07:20 PM.
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Old 06-16-2013, 08:36 PM
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Here is a pic that I got off of their website to show that no splicing is needed.
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when to install coolant filter?-heater-hose.jpg  
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  #8  
Old 06-16-2013, 08:46 PM
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Anyone who buys anything other than the IPR high flow coolant filter at this point is just throwing their money away IMO. It filters the full 3/4 flow from the heater line as opposed to a dinky little bypass stream. It uses a cleanable SS filter so you never have to buy filters and just works circles around all the other coolant filters out there It can do in weeks what the other guys would take months to do. Spend your money the way you want but you should seriously consider the IPR coolant filter. Yeah it's more expensive but it works a whole lot better to. And never buying filters will help you recoup cost over time as well.
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Old 06-16-2013, 08:49 PM
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And what's the big deal with splicing anyway? You cut the hose, put the T in and put the clamps on. Big deal.
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Old 06-16-2013, 09:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ford_Fan1 View Post
Here is a pic that I got off of their website to show that no splicing is needed.
I'm not an expert by any means, but I'm going to go out on a limb and say that the tee was spliced into that heater hose. I could go out and take a picture for you to see how long that hose is coming off the heater valve. Their kit is probably designed to pull the hose off the metal tube going from the water pump to the heater valve. They then want you to insert the tee into the valve end of the hose and slip their blue hose over the end of the metal tube. If you cut the original hose (we're now moving into semantics at this point) to accommodate a new fitting....you guess it...you've spliced into it.

Now, enough about that. I'm with Mitch on this (and this is biased as I'm currently running the IPR coolant filter), but that is the BEST coolant filter on the market for the 6.0, hands down. If you're not running an aftermarket oil cooler such as the BPD kit, you could even purchase IPR's coolant manifold to go with the filter and you'd really be pleased. Now, some might scoff at the amount of money that cost, but you get what you pay for. Filtering the coolant in your truck that is being supplied entirely by 3/4" (I.D.) hoses using a kit that supplies 3/8" hose (I.D.) falls back to my original statement earlier in the thread about how long it would take to successfully filter the entire system. With that being said, I will concede that ANY filter is better than no filter and you really should get one right away.

We've discussed why PMM is a horrible option and I provided a link to support my accusations, and we've talked about the best filter on the market. The choice is yours. What's your truck worth to you?
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