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  #1  
Old 09-11-2011, 10:17 AM
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Question Anyone running Evans coolant.

I was wondering if anyone has switched over to Evans waterless coolant and if they have what they think of it. I'm still trying to locate a supplier in Canada. However if a lot of people like it I'll import from the states

Last edited by Glueballs; 09-11-2011 at 10:18 AM. Reason: Poor proof reading.
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Old 09-11-2011, 10:32 AM
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Yes, I am.

Works Great.

Evans coolant

Lots of good information in that thread. There's a lot of misinformation out there from people who have never actually tried it early on in the thread, that is quite well debunked later. I highly recommend reading the WHOLE thread.
I chose to put my money where my mouth is, and actually try it.
So far, all the fears that have been mentioned have been unfounded, including the rediculous 'Omg its flammible, its gonna explode as soon as you get a leak'.

I personally had a Evans coolant leak directly on a hot exhaust manifold, and if just steamed off like any other coolant would have. No fire, no explosion, and best of all, had it been normal coolant that had leaked, I probably would have lost a lot more due to it being pressurized, and possibly require immediate service/a tow/etc. Since it was non-pressurized, After I noticed the leak, I continued driving it home, parked it in the driveway, and drove it to the shop to get the hose replaced the next day. If I REALLY wanted to, I could have put Duct Tape over the hose, and it would have held, but the leak was barely more than a slow, steady drip, so I opted not to do that.

Last edited by Dicion; 09-11-2011 at 10:42 AM.
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Old 09-11-2011, 06:33 PM
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Thanks for the heads up it is an awesome thread. If you don't mind me asking how long did it take you to get <3% water and are you still running with a hole in your degass cap?
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Old 09-11-2011, 07:23 PM
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I used it...it eats brass, so any fittings (Temperature sensors, etc) look like they were sand blasted after awhile.

It stinks like poo....BAD!!!

I still have one full jug that I will never use...

I believe I got mine from Edmonton.
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Old 09-11-2011, 08:15 PM
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I find it hard to believe that was a result of the waterless coolant. It must have been a containment or a high water content resulting in cavitation. NPG+ is a propylene/ethylene glycol mix. Neither chemical will cause brass corrosion. If you could give more details perhaps we could narrow down the cause of your issues.
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Old 09-12-2011, 05:42 AM
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I took it on a 2000 mile trip hauling 14k lbs a week after the swap. During the trip I had to top it off twice, since then, it's been solid. Yes, I still have the hole in my Degas cap, no reason that I can see to replace it, it's not going to evaporate out, and if there's any water still left in there, I'd want it to still be able to get out.

I also don't see how it could 'eat brass', as like glueballs said, it's just PG/EG, which is in normal coolants as well.

I will agree with what was said in that thread though, Evans will clean out your system, so much so, that any leaks that are clogged by gunk, and therefore not leaking, will have the gunk removed, and start leaking . I had a couple drip spots after I swapped, but they were all hoses that probably should have been replaced long ago anyways. Nothing major, and it was just that, some drips. No worries about high-pressure, boiling, spraying leaks with evans.

Just keep an eye on your engine bay for a week or so after swapping, as you check the level and top off. look for wet spots around hoses, especially the EGR cooler hose up there, thats where my biggest leak was. I Definately recommend adding a coolant filter kit as well at the same time, as all that gunk that will get cleaned out by the coolant, will be circulating. Makes it nice and easy to clean it up with a filter!

To me, there were just too many benefits to Evans compared to normal coolant.

Pros:

No Corrosion (no water!)
No Pressure (no boiling! no water!)
Near ZERO chance of an EGR Failure Ever (because it needs pressure to pop it)
No Oil Cooler Gunk (Either Due to Silicates or To Glyoxal creation, depending on which theory you follow)
Less stress on cooling parts due to less pressure
No chance of a coolant hose/radiator blowout/rupture. Leaks are just drips that can easily be patched with duct tape until you can get to where you need to go.

Cons:

Cost
Availability

Last edited by Dicion; 09-12-2011 at 05:49 AM.
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Old 09-12-2011, 06:23 AM
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Cons: if the Evans will clean and loosen any residue/scale/sand/debris after you already did a flush, you take a chance of clogging up the very small coolant passages in the oil cooler.

Keep an eye on your ECT/EOT delta, it may not happen instantly, but over time. Even if you use a coolant filter, a coolant filter is a bypass system designed to only filter 10% of the coolant at any given time.
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Old 09-12-2011, 07:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lilpooh View Post
Cons: if the Evans will clean and loosen any residue/scale/sand/debris after you already did a flush, you take a chance of clogging up the very small coolant passages in the oil cooler.

Keep an eye on your ECT/EOT delta, it may not happen instantly, but over time. Even if you use a coolant filter, a coolant filter is a bypass system designed to only filter 10% of the coolant at any given time.
That Con is there for Any coolant change, as altering the chemistry of your coolant system will inevitably change what gets deposited, and what gets picked up and carried around by the coolant. Especially with running flush cleaners like Restore, VC9, etc through. Those things are designed to lift off scale and residue, and yes, you attempt to flush it out as much as possible, but there will always be some left. That's why it's recommended to do your flush on the old oil cooler first, and also to run a coolant filter.

I did a complete flush, installed a filter, and ran Evans on my old cooler for a week before changing my cooler actually (my old cooler was functioning fine, it wasn't blocked, I had a 7 degree delta. I changed it because the seals around it were leaking. Figured once everything was off already, might as well). Also, the kind of Gunk that plugs up the cooler is either silicates or Glyoxal, depending on which theory you follow, not necessarily scale or casting sand. I'm more referring to it breaking down and dissolving other elements, not necessarily the 'goo'. (See analysis of coolant "GOO"......sorta for the Glyoxal discussion and the chemical breakdown of the 'goo' found in an Oil Cooler)

I'd personally recommend running a flush, and changing to Evans on your current oil cooler as I did (as long as it's not TOO fargone. Remember, simply switching to Evans will prevent flash-boiling and pressure, your EGR cooler is now much safer, even with higher deltas, than with normal coolant), installing a coolant filter as well, run for a few days to a week, and THEN changing your oil cooler, after the Evans has run through it decently, and hopefully everything that's going to come loose, does, and gets grabbed by the filter. Is it more work? Yes, but if you do it this way, you should never need to change an oil cooler or an EGR cooler ever again.

If your oil cooler is partially clogged, there is VERY LITTLE risk of EGR Cooler rupture anymore with Evans due to the much higher boiling point, and zero pressure system. At that point I'd be more concerned about hitting Defuelling level on EOT than EGR Failure. The only reason I say VERY LITTLE, and not NO RISK, is because the EGR Cooler is the one point where the Evans could possibly even come close to hitting it's boiling point. Even so, even if it did boil, any pressure created would immediately be vented out of the zero pressure system. If you Combine Evans with an EGR Delete, you'd have pretty much rock-solid protection. If you delete the EGR, the only reason left to change the oil cooler would literally be hitting Defuel level due to it being clogged. Defuel level being around 250 degrees, which is still 120 degrees LESS than the boiling point of Evans. No risk of blowing your oil cooler.

The problem I think most people are having is you have to completely rethink how your cooling system works when you remove water from it. It now has zero net pressure across the whole system (yes, the pump will create some positive pressure on the output side, but it will also create an equal amount of negative pressure on the inlet side, net 0 pressure across the system.) No net pressure means nothing can 'blow' anymore.. 370 degree boiling point means your engine oil will actually breakdown BEFORE your coolant even comes close to it's boiling point. It literally is just a flow of liquid that circulates through your engine, and can cause little to no damage on it's own anymore.

Last edited by Dicion; 09-12-2011 at 07:27 AM.
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  #9  
Old 09-12-2011, 04:20 PM
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Dicion, being that Glueballs is a new member, I had to point out a "con" of flushing out the coolant system in order to switch to another coolant. Either way, he needs to monitor his ECT/EOT delta before or after a coolant flush.

Please keep us (the members) posted with your results after switching to Evans. Thanks!
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Old 09-12-2011, 04:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lilpooh View Post
Dicion, being that Glueballs is a new member, I had to point out a "con" of flushing out the coolant system in order to switch to another coolant. Either way, he needs to monitor his ECT/EOT delta before or after a coolant flush.
Oh, absolutely! Not a problem pointing it out at all
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coolant, engine overheating, towing, waterless coolant

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