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Old 07-26-2014, 09:27 PM
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Unhappy water in oil pan

I currently own a 2006 F350 6.0 super-duty PU with 160,000 miles. As I was attempting to do an oil change, I noticed water coming out of the oil pan as soon as I removed the bolt to drain the oil. After a second or two I noticed black oil coming out. I recently noticed a problem with the coolant since I had to fill it up everytime I use this work truck. The truck never lost power and always observed normal gages.
Two months ago, my truck overheated at the landfill and had to be towed. After changing the starter, the truck worked fine. Last week, I noticed white smoke coming out of the tail pipe and then went away. In reading some of the blogs, I seems to be the headgaskets, crack in the engine, or heads. Don't have much money to repair it right now if it is major repair. Any suggestions. As mentioned, the truck never lost power and gages normal. The oil did not appear milky. Please let me know on any possible suggestions. Thanks!

Last edited by Rnuno; 07-26-2014 at 09:37 PM.
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Old 07-26-2014, 09:48 PM
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More than likely the oil cooler and EGR cooler are blown. Depending on how long you've driven it like that, the headgaskets could be toast.
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Old 07-27-2014, 08:18 AM
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Thanks for the advice and quick response. I will start taking it apart this week. I am hoping it is the head gaskets and not anything major. Do u know how to tell if the the egr and oil cooler are blown? I saw a video on how to replace the seals on the EGr and oil cooler. Do you recommend I do this? I'm new to Diesel engines.
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Old 07-27-2014, 09:01 AM
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Pull the egr valve, if there's moisture, then the egr cooler is leaking or blown. If it is, then the oil cooler is gone as well, egr failure is the result of a clogged oil cooler. It's a very itme consuming job, if you have some wrenching ability you should be able to handle it.
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Old 07-27-2014, 04:48 PM
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Quote:
More than likely the oil cooler and EGR cooler are blown.
No, to the oil cooler as it usually puts oil into the coolant!

Possibly, the EGR cooler, but it could also be a few other things, all that are somewhat expensive to fix.
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Old 07-27-2014, 05:52 PM
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Don't jump to the head gaskets. I suspect that many heads are pulled and studs installed when the only real issue was the coolers. And I'm not sure it is quite accurate to say that the EGR cooler fails because the oil cooler clogs. It seems to start with the EGR cooler where the short distance from the exhaust ports means extreme temperatures, which cooks the coolant ( Ford gold breaks down at those temps, silicates drop out to a gritty sand and goo. Green stuff even worse, a lot worse.) Some of that starts clogging the cooler passages and the rest flows next to the oil cooler and clogs it up. But that's the coolant passages being clogged, not the oil passages.

So now you have gradual clogging of both coolers, which means that the coolant moves more slowly and has more time to cook in the super-hot EGR cooler and not cooling it as much, and reduced flow of hotter water through the oil cooler which makes it less efficient and shows up as higher delta in your temps. But in most cases your radiator and T-stat are able to handle the coolant when it gets there so the problem never shows on your dash gauge.

So far you aren't really hurting the engine if your dash temps are good unless the oil temp gets way high and breaks down. The coolant in the engine is still at the correct temp so the head gaskets are not trying to fail. But eventually the coolant passages in both coolers, like clogged arteries, restrict flow to the point that the EGR cooler gets too hot and cracks or ruptures and spews coolant back into the exhaust. That comes out as sweet white smoke/steam, and exhaust getting into the coolant passages may cause that to boil out the degas tank. Classic symptoms of a head gasket, but not a head gasket, yet.

Ignore the problem and just keep adding coolant is the worst thing you can do because it will get worse and at an accelerated rate. If you lose track and let it get too low, you may overheat the engine and blow a head gasket. Eventually the EGR cooler fails in a big way and loses coolant so fast that it fills one or more cylinders with fluid. If you are lucky it fogs the neighborhood but can pump it out until you shut down. Then the residual pressure fills one or two cylinders and if you try to start again you get a fluid-lock situation but do no additional harm. If you are less lucky it fills a little faster and locks up while idling, perhaps "lifting" a head. If you are unlucky it does that under load, doing all that and also bending a rod or two and maybe the crank.

But, from what I have seen and talking to guys who have dealt with many of these, real head gasket issues are less common than their replacement rate suggest.

Moral of the story: Run the correct coolant, monitor your temps and especially the delta, and deal with problems quickly. Not knee-jerk & replace everything at the first sign of something unusual, but pay attention and don't let problems fester because on these trucks more than anything I've owned, it gets expensive fast.
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Last edited by sjsche; 07-27-2014 at 06:06 PM.
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Old 07-27-2014, 05:53 PM
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water in oil pan

Find it hard to believe the oil wasn't creamed.

Are you certain it wasn't diesel fuel?
Sent from AutoGuide.com App
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Old 07-27-2014, 06:37 PM
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Quote:
Don't jump to the head gaskets. I suspect that many heads are pulled and studs installed when the only real issue was the coolers. And I'm not sure it is quite accurate to say that the EGR cooler fails because the oil cooler clogs. It seems to start with the EGR cooler where the short distance from the exhaust ports means extreme temperatures, which cooks the coolant ( Ford gold breaks down at those temps, silicates drop out to a gritty sand and goo. Green stuff even worse, a lot worse.
The EGR Cooler used to be thought of being the first weak link, before the understanding of the clogged Oil Cooler causing low flow in the EGR Cooler, which eventually caused the larger problems.
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Old 07-27-2014, 06:45 PM
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But my contention is that the low flow through the oil cooler is a consequence of the EGR cooler cooking the coolant which in turn glogs the oil cooler, which slows the flow rate and thereby increases the coolant temp, cooking and clogging even faster. So I'm saying it is the first weak link, in part because the coolant specified for the engine by the designers was not used. Ford's "Better Idea" is the real first weak link.
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Old 07-28-2014, 04:43 AM
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No because the coolant passes from the engine/pump thru the oil cooler first before it gets too the egr cooler. Restricted flow of coolant hitting the egr cooler causes the hot exhaust gasses to flash boil the coolant and useually ruptures something in the egr cooler.
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