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Old 10-22-2012, 05:29 AM
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FICM question

I know my FICM is getting weak, because my Edge Insight shows that it dips down to 46-47 while driving, and it is supposed to be at 48. On start up, it dips down even lower. This morning when I started it, it didn't start right away, took three separate tries to start. And when it did start, my Insight was showing 43 FICMV and beeping at me. So I know that is shot.

My question is, could a weak FICM be causing cylinder contribution problems. I have noticed lately that when I start my Pickup after it sits for a while, or it is cold out, it runs rougher than normal, and sets off the cylinder #2 contribution DTC. It is always number 2, so I am leaning towards a bad injector, but just curious if it could just be the FICM. I plan on having the EGR deleted, update the STC's, and a new oil cooler if I ever get time off of work, and want some opinions to help decide if I should go ahead and get new injectors while it's apart.

On that note, what is a good FICM, or a good place to get one?

The pickup is a 2006 F-250 with 81300 miles. Thanks for the input.
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Old 10-22-2012, 07:48 AM
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I'm not sure on the contribution code, but I can tell you that before my FICM went out I got injector circuit low codes (electrical side).

As for the FICM, I would check out FICMrepair.com for it, unless you want to go with the Bullet Proof diesel option. It's more money, but you get an improved power supply and heat sink. I believe you'll have to re-use your existing logic board though.

If you go the repair route, I can only say good things about FICMrepair, as have many others on here. They are very knowledgable and got me back on the road fast, plus they offer some tuning options for it if you want. I got the eco-tune on mine and it made a huge difference on my previously stock tuned truck.
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Old 10-22-2012, 09:04 AM
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You may have a lazy spool valve on injector #2 and running low power to it will only make it worse.
I would get your ficm fixed first for sure and take a good look at your batteries and alternator, if you have any problems with either of those also fix them.
Low voltage is usually what take down the ficm, once all those up up to specs then see how that injector is acting
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Old 10-22-2012, 09:53 AM
edo edo is offline
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yes the ficm causes the engine miss and sets the contribution code your dealer can reprogram your ficm and this will usually raise ficm m power back up to 48 volts
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Old 10-22-2012, 11:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edo View Post
yes the ficm causes the engine miss and sets the contribution code your dealer can reprogram your ficm and this will usually raise ficm m power back up to 48 volts
Dealer can reflash your ficm to thier latest Ford version but; if you are down voltage odds are one of the 0.075 foil resistors are burned out from being stressed with too low of supply power.
They can also desolder themselfs from exessive heat and of coarse can burn through, I just bought some new resistors for .49 cents each to repair a extra ficm of mine.

Dealer cannot flash away your problem. lol

Last edited by mhatlen; 10-22-2012 at 11:29 AM.
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Old 10-22-2012, 11:45 AM
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Like the man said If it is a physical problem only a physical repair will fix it. If it's program parremeters then a flash may help but won't fix a broken solder point or a bad capacitor.
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Old 10-22-2012, 04:07 PM
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Thanks for the input! I do know that my batteries need to be replaced. They have gotten me by and that is all I have asked of them. I have had several no start issues (99% sure it was the STC's because engine was warm and always started when it cooled) and they have always turned my pickup over. I did leave my headlights on one day and had to jump it to start though. When I started my pickup last night was the worse that I had seen the FICM voltage, and it also didn't crank like it used to, so first things first, I will get new batteries! It's winter time, and it gets cold in ND so I needed to do it anyhow!

It's probably too late for the new batteries to resurrect the FICM, but like I said, they are needed. I will do some budgeting, but I would like to get a performance FICM to replace the stock one. Nothing too crazy, but maybe a little more power. I have a lot I want to do to that pickup yet, but I need to nip this FICM issue in the arse soon, or it will be a miserable winter!
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Old 10-24-2012, 08:25 PM
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Repairing your FICM is not to hard if you are at all competent soldering circuit boards. You can search my posts for a link to a great description of the process. Solved my problems!
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Old 10-24-2012, 10:24 PM
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Originally Posted by fuzzman View Post
Repairing your FICM is not to hard if you are at all competent soldering circuit boards. You can search my posts for a link to a great description of the process. Solved my problems!
The resistors are available online from Mouser ULRB125R0075FLFSLT price on these are .49 cents each.lol And they are quite easy to replace. Good Luck with it.
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Old 10-24-2012, 11:11 PM
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FICM repair

Here's a copy of a write up I did a few months back:

I found a couple of useful links (I think a little better than the one's you have been pointed to). The first one describes testing, and removal of the FICM, it's a YouTube video from an outfit that offers to rebuild your FICM. Great video, and from what I gather a great company if you decide to go that route. Check this out first:


The second link is for instructions for you to repair your own FICM should you find low voltage. I'm no electronics genius, but I managed to do this, and solved my problem!

http://powerstrokedenver.com/wp-cont...ICMVoltage.pdf

I'm not a mechanic, but I do have basic tools and I'm not afraid to dive into something if I have clear instructions. These instructions are clear!

One piece of advice if you are looking to repair the FICM yourself. In the description on the second link, prior to resoldering the instructions tell you to remove some amber film that is on the circuit board. This is some goop that it seems was melted and then poured over large sections of the circuit board to protect it. Mine had a lot on it (way too much). The instructions said to heat it to remove it, but to first try to remove it without heating it to avoid a gooey mess. I did this and the amber stuff ripped a circuit right out of the board! I then not only had to repair the recommended areas, but also had to make and install a jumper for that circuit. Lucky for me my buddy's dad was there to help or I would have been sunk! I recommend following all of the instructions just as given, except that I would heat the amber goo to loosen it from the circuit board a little before removing.

I have 46+ voltage accross the board, and my truck is running great!
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